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ServiceNow BrandVoice: Who Workflows The Workflows?

#artificialintelligence

There was a time not so long ago when certain software companies thought the world revolved around them. Those days are gone--as are some of those companies. Today, our world revolves around our customers. We're constantly iterating and innovating in a quest to supply them with the tools, deployment, account reps, developers, and intelligence to succeed. The path to workflow hyperautomation is on the horizon.


Frightening reality of Meta-built artificial intelligence that can think "the way we do"

#artificialintelligence

Meta founder Mark Zuckerberg was met with a mixed reaction after touting his company's "exciting breakthrough" towards creating an artificial intelligence system that thinks "the way we do." In a Facebook post on Thursday, Zuckerberg hailed the development of Meta's data2vec, a new artificial intelligence algorithm that is capable of learning about several different types of information without supervision. Zuckerberg predicted that the development could eventually be used to more effectively help people perform common tasks like cooking. "Exciting breakthrough: Meta AI research built a system that learns from speech, vision and text without needing labeled training data," Zuckerberg wrote in the post. "People experience the world through a combination of sight, sound and words, and systems like this could one day understand the world the way we do."


Python AI: Why Python is Better for Machine Learning and AI

#artificialintelligence

Today, most companies are using Python for AI and Machine Learning. With predictive analytics and pattern recognition becoming more popular than every, Python development services are a priority for high-scale enterprises and startups. Python developers are in high-demand – mostly because of what they can achieve with the language. AI programming languages need to be powerful, scalable, and readable. Python code delivers on all three.


Artificial intelligence can discriminate on the basis of race and gender, and also age

#artificialintelligence

We have accepted the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in complex processes--from health care to our daily use of social media--often without critical investigation, until it is too late. The use of AI is inescapable in our modern society, and it may perpetuate discrimination without its users being aware of any prejudice. When health-care providers rely on biased technology, there are real and harmful impacts. This became clear recently when a study showed that pulse oximeters--which measure the amount of oxygen in the blood and have been an essential tool for clinical management of COVID-19--are less accurate on people with darker skin than lighter skin. The findings resulted in a sweeping racial bias review now underway, in an attempt to create international standards for testing medical devices.


Microsoft Buying Activision Blizzard Might Be Good For Gamers, But Bad for Developers

TIME - Tech

On Tuesday tech giant Microsoft announced its proposed purchase of gaming company Activision Blizzard for nearly $69 billion. The deal would grant Microsoft ownership over globally recognized franchises like Call of Duty, World of Warcraft, and Candy Crush, to name a few. It also creates a new division in the company, Microsoft Gaming, to be led by the company's head of its Xbox division, Phil Spencer. For Activision Blizzard, this couldn't have come at a better time. The company, run by CEO Bobby Kotick since 1991, has been the subject of scrutiny and lawsuits based on numerous allegations of discrimination, sexual harassment, and a toxic workplace culture at the company.


Artificial intelligence can discriminate on the basis of race and gender, and also age

#artificialintelligence

We have accepted the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in complex processes -- from health care to our daily use of social media -- often without critical investigation, until it is too late. The use of AI is inescapable in our modern society, and it may perpetuate discrimination without its users being aware of any prejudice. When health-care providers rely on biased technology, there are real and harmful impacts. This became clear recently when a study showed that pulse oximeters -- which measure the amount of oxygen in the blood and have been an essential tool for clinical management of COVID-19 -- are less accurate on people with darker skin than lighter skin. The findings resulted in a sweeping racial bias review now underway, in an attempt to create international standards for testing medical devices.


From engineering 'guilds' to open source, how Bloomberg's developers are driving innovation

ZDNet

Bloomberg has 10 guilds within its engineering department, spanning programming, machine learning, natural language processing and web frontend development. Adam Wolf leads the software infrastructure group in Bloomberg's Engineering department. His team is responsible for developing the foundation on which more than 5,500 developers build their applications and roll out new code that integrates instantly into clients' workflows. He tells ZDNet how the finance and data giant uses a range of software development techniques – from sharing knowledge to creating'guilds' and onto embracing open source – to meet the needs of its customers in the global financial markets. Here's a list of the most popular programming languages and where to learn them Bloomberg's workflows span the gamut of financial services capabilities, from real-time market data and analytics to income, equities, foreign exchange and commodities.


Microsoft hopes to buy Activision Blizzard in a deal that would make gaming history

PCWorld

Microsoft has been on a gaming acquisition tear for the last few years, hoping to give the edge to its Xbox and Game Pass platforms as Sony's PlayStation continues to dominate with exclusive titles. The company previously purchased such notable companies as ZeniMax (AKA Bethesda), Minecraft developer Mojang, Id, Obsidian, Ninja Theory, Rare, Double Fine, and 343 Industries. But the computer giant's next purchase is so big it might shake the foundations of the gaming industry: Activision Blizzard. The news comes from as an official announcement from Microsoft itself, emblazoned with its prospective acquisition's biggest game series like World of Warcraft, Call of Duty, and Candy Crush. The acquisition is valued at $68.7 billion with Microsoft buying Activision Blizzard stock shares at $95 each. The deal is being given a full media blitz with a promotional page, press release, blog posts, open letters to employees, and even a map of the proposed management team.


Brainchip ships first mini PCIexpress board with spiking neural network chip

#artificialintelligence

Brainchip has begun taking orders for the first commercially available Mini PCIe board using its Akida advanced neural networking processor. The $499 AKD1000-powered Mini PCIe boards can be plugged into a developer's existing system to unlock capabilities for a wide array of edge AI applications, including Smart City, Smart Health, Smart Home and Smart Transportation. BrainChip will also offer the full PCIe design layout files and the bill of materials (BOM) to system integrators and developers to enable them to build their own boards and implement AKD1000 chips in volume as a stand-alone embedded accelerator or as a co-processor. The boards provide the ability to perform AI training and learning on the device itself, without dependency on the cloud. The production-ready chips provide high-speed neuromorphic processing of sensor data at a low cost, high speed and very low power consumption with in-built security.


A busy year ahead in low-code and no-code development

ZDNet

Will 2022 be the year the year citizen developers finally take the reigns leading application development across their respective lines of business? It looks likely, thanks to emerging low-code, no-code and serverless solutions. And, importantly, there will also be another "citizen" in the mix -- professional developers themselves, rapidly accelerating their abilities to plan, assemble and maintain increasingly complex enterprise systems. Non-developers and developers alike are increasingly seeing greater sophistication in the applications they can build with low or no-code approaches. For example, one of the announcements coming out of AWS' recent re:Invent conference was an enhanced platform offering, Amazon SageMaker Canvas, designed to make AI development accessible to the masses through a visual, no code capability that enables business analysts to build machine learning models and generate accurate predictions without writing code or requiring machine learning expertise. Many other vendors are tacking toward offerings requiring little or no coding knowledge, with much of the backend integration and logic hidden in the background, powered by automation and AI.