conference


Researchers analyze Kuroda's facial microexpressions to predict central bank policy moves

The Japan Times

For decades, economists have tried to guess central bank policy direction by studying subtle changes in official language -- now, researchers are finding new clues on policy, not in the words of central bankers but in their faces. In Japan, two artificial intelligence researchers, one from Nomura Securities and the other from Microsoft, are using software to analyze split-second changes in the facial expressions of Bank of Japan Gov. Haruhiko Kuroda at his post-meeting news conferences. Their study found that Kuroda showed fleeting signs of "anger" and "disgust" at news conferences that preceded two recent major policy changes -- the January 2016 introduction of negative interest rates and the adoption of the so-called yield curve control policy in September last year. The implication is that Kuroda was beginning to sense the constraints of existing policies about six or seven weeks before the central bank's board actually decided to change them, the researchers concluded. The research was presented last weekend to a subcommittee meeting of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence (JSAI).


In Kuroda's face - researchers find ways to predict central bank changes

#artificialintelligence

TOKYO (Reuters) - For decades, economists have tried to guess central bank policy direction by studying subtle changes in official language -- now, researchers are finding new clues on policy, not in the words of central banker but in their faces. In Japan, two artificial intelligence researchers, one from Nomura Securities and the other from Microsoft (NASDAQ:MSFT), are using software to analyze split-second changes in the facial expressions of Bank of Japan Governor Haruhiko Kuroda at his post-meeting press conferences. Their study found that Kuroda showed fleeting signs of "anger" and "disgust" at news conferences that preceded two recent major policy changes -- the January 2016 introduction of negative interest rates and the adoption of the so-called "yield curve control" policy September last year. The implication is that Kuroda was beginning to sense the constraints of existing policies about six or seven weeks before the central bank's board actually decided to change them, the researchers concluded. The research was presented last weekend to a subcommittee meeting of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence (JSAI).


GopherCon 2017 - Lightning Talk: Pete Garcin - Building an ML-Powered Game AI Using TensorFlow in Go

@machinelearnbot

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Chipmakers find new ways to move forward

ZDNet

Chip designers face a daunting task. The tool that they have relied on to make things smaller, faster and cheaper, known as Moore's Law, is increasingly ineffective. At the same time, new applications such as deep learning are demanding more powerful and efficient hardware. It is now clear that scaling general-purpose CPUs alone won't be sufficient to meet the performance per watt targets of future applications, and much of the heavy lifting is being offloaded to accelerators such as GPUs, FPGAs, DSPs and even custom ASICs such as Google's TPU. The catch is that these complex heterogeneous systems are difficult to design, manufacture and program.


The Most Cringe-Inducing Surgical Robots from IEEE's Intelligent Robots Conference

IEEE Spectrum Robotics Channel

We're still sifting through the more than 1,200 presentations at IROS 2017, IEEE's massive intelligent robots conference held last month in Vancouver. This week we found some terrifying gems: surgical robots that snake up the nose, puncture the breast, and suction intestinal tissue with motions so jarring they will make any patient glad (or longing) to be passed out during the procedure. We previously highlighted 20 of our favorite videos from the conference. Now, with Halloween approaching, we give you: the five most gruesome (maniacal laugh). Sadistically named the "Stormram," this robot punctures the breast in one slow, ominous motion, to extract a tissue sample.


Adobe says it wants AI to amplify human creativity and intelligence

#artificialintelligence

About a year ago, Adobe announced its Sensei AI platform. Unlike other companies, Adobe says that it has no interest in building a general artificial intelligence platform -- instead, it wants to build a platform squarely focused on helping its customers be more creative. This week, at its Max conference, Adobe provided both more insight into what this means and showed off a number of prototypes for how it plans to integrate Sensei into its flagship tools. "We are not building a general purpose AI platform like some others in the industry are -- and it's great that they are building it," Adobe CTO Abhay Parasnis noted in a press conference after today's keynote. "We have a very deep understanding of how creative professionals work in imagining, in photography, in video, in design and illustration.


The 'Google of China' is working on a driverless bus for next year and fully self-driving cars by 2021

Mashable

Chinese search giant Baidu has some bold new targets for its self-driving auto plans. Baidu CEO Robin Li outlined company's self-driving vehicle goals for the next few years onstage at the Wall Street Journal's D.Live technology conference, touting a plan to roll out driverless busses in China next year, semi-autonomous vehicles by 2019, and fully autonomous cars by 2021. Li also revealed that Baidu spends about $1.5 billion on self-driving R&D efforts annually, which amounts to about 15 percent of the company's revenue. The driverless bus will be manufactured by an unnamed Chinese bus maker, with plans to run one predetermined route when its ready for service. Baidu will partner with Chinese automaker BAIC Motor to make the self-driving vehicles, since the tech company has focused primarily on developing its autonomous platform, rather than actually making cars.


The AI fight is escalating: This is the IT giants' next move

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence is where the competition is in IT, with Microsoft and Google both parading powerful, always-available AI tools for the enterprise at their respective developer conferences, Build and I/O, in May. It's not just about work: AI software can now play chess, go, and some retro video games better than any human -- and even drive a car better than many of us. These superhuman performances, albeit in narrow fields, are all possible thanks to the application of decades of AI research -- research that is increasingly, as at Build and I/O, making it out of the lab and into the real world. Alexa and Samsung Electronics' Bixby may offer less-than-superhuman performance, but they also require vastly less power than a supercomputer to run. Businesses can dabble on the edges of these, for example developing Alexa "skills" that allow Amazon Echo owners to interact with a company without having to dial its call center, or jump right in, using the various cloud-based speech recognition and text-to-speech "-as-a-service" offerings to develop full-fledged automated call centers of their own.


Sony unveils family-friendly robot aimed at spurring communication

The Japan Times

Sony Mobile Communications Inc. announced Tuesday it will begin selling a new communications robot targeted at families next month, furthering its foray into the trending robot market. "We've developed this product based on a theme of making it a new member of the family," Hiroshi Ito, deputy head of the smart products division at Sony Mobile, said during a news conference in Tokyo. "We'd like to propose a new way of communication with this that makes communication more fun for families." Dubbed Xperia Hello, the robot will hit store shelves Nov. 18 and is expected to sell for around ¥150,000. The 21-cm conical-shaped robot can perform various functions such as using its camera to recognize people's faces and then chatting with them.


This tool will help you build a chatbot

#artificialintelligence

This week's tool takes a step into the future, as our colleague Nick Saffan shares the bot-building tool he learned how to use at the Online News Association conference last week and the two bots he has already built with it. I might be saying this too soon, but I actually didn't catch the conference funk this time. Did you pick up anything? Hare: Only various and sundry things to drink from: A cool water bottle, a shot glass and, my favorite, a copper mug. The people behind the swag know our tribe well.