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AI Training and Training with AI - Constructech

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What this will mean, in the short term, is that AI will become significantly more capable, in less time due to dramatically faster prototyping and larger scale training. In addition, there will be a growth in practical applications of AI because the new paradigm of training at the edge avoids the huge upfront costs of centralized training in the cloud. Millions more developers can now participate in advancing AI solutions. Because training can be coordinated between devices using the IoT (Internet of Things), the cloud infrastructure will have a diminished role. One of the early applications of AI in the construction industry is for training workers and improving their skills.


State of AI: Artificial Intelligence, the Military and Increasingly Autonomous Weapons - Future of Life Institute

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As artificial intelligence works its way into industries like healthcare and finance, governments around the world are increasingly investing in another of its applications: autonomous weapons systems. Many are already developing programs and technologies that they hope will give them an edge over their adversaries, creating mounting pressure for others to follow suite. These investments appear to mark the early stages of an AI arms race. Much like the nuclear arms race of the 20th century, this type of military escalation poses a threat to all humanity and is ultimately unwinnable. It incentivizes speed over safety and ethics in the development of new technologies, and as these technologies proliferate it offers no long-term advantage to any one player.


AI Stats News: 39% Of Business Executives Predict China Will Overtake US As The Global AI Leader

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The recent surveys, studies, forecasts and other quantitative assessments of the health and progress of AI provided new numbers regarding business leaders' assessment of China as a global AI leader, the current worldwide ranking of China's AI-related entrepreneurial and research activities, plans for AI adoption by U.S. enterprises and expectations regarding its impact on jobs, and the use of AI in face recognition, physical security monitoring, cashierless retail, categorizing open-ended survey responses, and detecting plant diseases and atrial fibrillation. A doctor examines a magnetic resonance image on a computer screen during the CHAIN Cup at the China National Convention Center in Beijing, June 30, 2018. A computer running artificial intelligence software defeated two teams of human doctors in accurately recognizing maladies in magnetic resonance images in a contest that was billed as the world's first competition in neuroimaging between AI and human experts. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security estimates face recognition will scrutinize 97% of outbound airline passengers by 2023 [The Economist] More than 4.5 million websites use reCAPTCHA and the system collects hundreds of millions of daily solves or more than 100 person-years of labor every day; Google/reCAPTCHA has extracted to date over $7 billion of free labor [hcaptcha] The Bureau of Labor Statistics' injury and illness database is built upon text-based descriptions of work-related injuries and illnesses it receives from workplaces across the country each year; categorizing the description into actionable data used to be done manually, but this year, the BLS has done 80% of that automatically using deep neural networks [governmentCIO] The AI market worldwide is estimated to grow by $75.54 billion from 2019 to 2023 [Technavio] The AI market worldwide is estimated to reach $202.57 Data is eating the world quote of the week: "The market for data labeling passed $500 million in 2018 and it will reach $1.2 billion by 2023, according to the research firm Cognilytica. This kind of work, the study showed, accounted for 80 percent of the time spent building A.I. technology"--The New York Times AI is "mimicking the brain" quote of the week: "Computer vision… is nothing like the human sort"--The Economist Robots are eating the world quote of the week: "A human can certainly move a part faster than a cobot [collaborative robot]. However, it does not take coffee breaks and continues to work for several hours after we have already gone home"--Pekka Myller, Ket-Met Robots are eating the world quote of the 19th century: "[A Linotype] could work like six men and do everything but drink, swear, and go out on strike"--Mark Twain


U.S. Army banks on artificial intelligence to beat China and Russia

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A key piece of the Pentagon's plan to beat China and Russia in the high-stakes artificial intelligence race lies inside a research facility along the Allegheny River here, where a small but select U.S. Army team has been tasked with creating the weapons, vehicles and sensors needed for 21st-century combat. Inside, the U.S. military is feverishly working to incorporate AI into its operations in a myriad of ways, including drones and robots to ferry wounded soldiers away from the battlefield, software that can spot a hidden enemy force over a hill, AI programs that can give generals and line soldiers a fuller picture of a confusing battle, and even algorithms that can outperform any resume in determining the right men and women for a specific job. Those projects, and a host of others, form the backbone of a major Pentagon initiative that carries far-reaching implications for the 21st century global balance of power. The Army's AI Task Force, created earlier this year as part of the Defense Department's broader effort to turn what was once science fiction into reality, has brought together military officials and academic leaders at Carnegie Mellon University, an institution considered to be the birthplace of AI research. Tucked in a spot more than two miles off the main campus that is unlikely to be found unless one knew where to look, the school's National Robotics Engineering Center serves as the epicenter of a partnership between the Army and academia.


Could China Develop Killer Robots in the Near Future? Experts Fear So

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Russia started sabotaging the discussion from the very first session. Throughout the morning of Aug. 21, its diplomats at the United Nations in Geneva took the floor, nitpicking language in a document meant to pave the way for an eventual ban on lethal autonomous weapons, also known as killer robots, an emerging category of weapons that would be able to fight on their own and decide who to target and kill. "They were basically trying to waste time," says Laura Nolan of the International Committee for Robot Arms Control, who watched with frustration in the hall. But while Russia vigorously worked to derail progress, it had a quieter partner: China. "I very much get the impression that they're working together in some way," says Nolan. "[The Chinese] are letting the Russians steamroll the process, and they're happy to hang back."


AI in Five, Fifty and Five Hundred Years -- Part One

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You have to step outside of your own limitations, your own beliefs, your own flawed and fragmented angle on the world and see it from a thousand different perspectives. You have to see giant abstract patterns and filter through human nature, politics, technology, social dynamics, trends, statistics and probability. It's so mind-numbingly complex that our tiny little simian brains stand very little chance of getting it right. Even predicting the future five or ten years out is amazingly complicated. So what am I going to do? Yes, I realize this is utterly insane. It's like climbing Mount Everest, with no shoes, no jacket, no Sherpa, and no oxygen after having barely climbed a small hill! Of course, I'm going to do it anyway. When someone asked George Mallory why he climbed Mt Everest, he said "because it was there." Like many famous quotes, he probably never really said it but who cares? The quote was so good we had to invent it anyway! Let's dive in and take a look at how AI will change society in the next few years, and by the time you're old and grey, and when you're long since turned to dust.


Jack Ma steps down on 20th birthday of Alibaba ZDNet

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Jack Ma has stepped down from the position of chairman at the company he co-founded exactly 20 years ago. Ma announced his retirement plans last year, saying at the time he wanted to spend more time focusing on education. "After tonight I will start a new life," Ma reportedly said at Tuesday's event. "I do believe the world is good, there are so many opportunities, and I love excitement so much, which is why I will retire early." His retirement was not the end of an era, the former English teacher said when he announced he was stepping down, but "the beginning of an era," adding also at the time, "I love education".


Jack Ma steps down on 20th birthday of Alibaba ZDNet

#artificialintelligence

Jack Ma has stepped down from the position of chairman at the company he co-founded exactly 20 years ago. Ma announced his retirement plans last year, saying at the time he wanted to spend more time focusing on education. "After tonight I will start a new life," Ma reportedly said at Tuesday's event. "I do believe the world is good, there are so many opportunities, and I love excitement so much, which is why I will retire early." His retirement was not the end of an era, the former English teacher said when he announced he was stepping down, but "the beginning of an era," adding also at the time, "I love education".


Chinese police sniff out a fugitive -- literally -- in the case of the telltale hot pot

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China's rapidly evolving surveillance technologies have snared their share of fugitives in recent years. Most of these cases have involved facial recognition cameras, which can detect individual facial features regardless of glasses, hats or masks. There were the 80-odd wanted suspects picked out of crowds of tens of thousands of fans at concerts by Jacky Cheung, a legendary Hong Kong pop star. In April this year, a genius student wanted on suspicion of killing his mother was caught after being on the lam for almost four years. He was nabbed within 10 minutes of entering Chongqing airport, local media outlet Southern Metropolis Daily reported.


Police drone caught barking orders at Chinese driver

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Police in China don't have to pull drivers over to warn them of traffic offenses -- now they can just bark orders from hovering drones. On Friday, state broadcaster CCTV aired footage of traffic police using a drone to tell a scooter rider to put on his helmet, according to a newly published South China Morning Post story. After realizing the disembodied voice was speaking to him, the rider sheepishly complied. SCMP reported that within four hours, the clip garnered 34 million views on the Twitter-like Chinese site Weibo, with most social media users appearing to find it humorous. That response could indicate that people in China are becoming -- or, perhaps, already are -- desensitized to the nation's Big Brother-esque surveillance efforts.