Goto

Collaborating Authors

china


In China, facial recognition, public shaming and control go hand in hand

#artificialintelligence

A screen shows a demonstration of SenseTime Group's SenseVideo pedestrian and vehicle recognition system at the company's showroom in Beijing. Facial recognition supporters in the US often argue that the surveillance technology is reserved for the greatest risks -- to help deal with violent crimes, terrorist threats and human trafficking. And while it's still often used for petty crimes like shoplifting, stealing $12 worth of goods or selling $50 worth of drugs, its use in the US still looks tame compared with how widely deployed facial recognition has been in China. A database leak in 2019 gave a glimpse of how pervasive China's surveillance tools are -- with more than 6.8 million records from a single day, taken from cameras positioned around hotels, parks, tourism spots and mosques, logging details on people as young as 9 days old. The Chinese government is accused of using facial recognition to commit atrocities against Uyghur Muslims, relying on the technology to carry out "the largest mass incarceration of a minority population in the world today."


In China, facial recognition, public shaming and control go hand in hand - CNET

CNET - News

A screen shows a demonstration of SenseTime Group's SenseVideo pedestrian and vehicle recognition system at the company's showroom in Beijing. Facial recognition supporters in the US often argue that the surveillance technology is reserved for the greatest risks -- to help deal with violent crimes, terrorist threats and human trafficking. And while it's still often used for petty crimes like shoplifting, stealing $12 worth of goods or selling $50 worth of drugs, its use in the US still looks tame compared with how widely deployed facial recognition has been in China. A database leak in 2019 gave a glimpse of how pervasive China's surveillance tools are -- with more than 6.8 million records from a single day, taken from cameras positioned around hotels, parks, tourism spots and mosques, logging details on people as young as 9 days old. The Chinese government is accused of using facial recognition to commit atrocities against Uyghur Muslims, relying on the technology to carry out "the largest mass incarceration of a minority population in the world today."


The White House Announces a Plan to Speed the Rollout of 5G

WIRED

The White House and Defense Department on Monday announced a plan to accelerate the process by making a crucial new chunk of spectrum available to the wireless industry. The spectrum, which telecom companies will share with the Pentagon, aims to help wireless carriers offer 5G more broadly across the US. It also should generate billions of dollars for the US Treasury when auctioned off. The frequency is currently being used for high-power defense radar, but the DoD has determined that it can be freed up without affecting military systems. "It's a big deal," for the wireless industry, says Jason Leigh, an analyst at IDC who focuses on 5G.


How China Controlled the Coronavirus

The New Yorker

Afew days before my return to classroom teaching at Sichuan University, I was biking across a deserted stretch of campus when I encountered a robot. The blocky machine stood about chest-high, on four wheels, not quite as long as a golf cart. In front was a T-shaped device that appeared to be some kind of sensor. The robot rolled past me, its electric motor humming. I turned around and tailed the thing at a distance of fifteen feet.


3 Reasons for Opening the Doors of Automation in a Geopolitical World - NASSCOM Community

#artificialintelligence

“Knock! Knock! “Who’s there?” “Pen!” “Pen who?” “..’pen the doors of automation before it’s too late.” Apologies, if I cracked a poor ‘knock knock’ joke, but hey, that seems to be the buzzword nowadays, isn’t it? It amazes me to learn that while I was taught subjects like Geography, Computer Science etcetera in school, the youth today will be exposed to skills like Data Science and AI. The Indian Government launched the Responsible AI for Youth Program making the AI revolution real easily accessible to government school students between classes 8 and 12. This move suggests that the doors for automation are wide open and will largely impact both the present and the future. According to a report by Cairn, automation and AI are likely to determine the international order for decades to come, accelerating the dynamics of an old cycle in which technology and power influence one another.3 Elon Musk, founder of Space X and Tesla mentioned how the competition for AI “at a national level will likely cause the third World War”. The rapid progress in automation clearly then makes it a powerful tool from the economic, political and military standpoints Here are three ways in which automation will play a key role in a geopolitical world. 1.Floodgates of opportunity for entrepreneurs- The monthly user base of TikTok, the short-form video app in India grew to 79 million by the end of 2019. A collective ban on interactive apps like TikTok or WeChat for a country with 1 billion people is bound to open opportunities for developers to replicate their success with Indian counterparts of these apps. The call for ‘aatmanirbhar bharat’ further elevates the point and brings forward a question of data and AI powered apps built locally. 2.Diversifying Manufacturing- Organizations (especially in USA) were keeping a close eye on implications of heightened US-China trade war even before COVID.1 A key consequence of the heated political scenario with China (for India and many other countries) will be a global diversification of supply chains instead of relying on China. Manufacturing hubs like Vietnam, Mexico and India are likely to adopt decentralization of manufacturing especially by embracing automation and adopting small batch production. Therefore, the supply chains are likely to either move back home locally or countries might start looking for alternatives other than China.4 3.The need for cost-effective labour and products- Many countries including India depended on China for cheap raw materials and labour thus switching to alternatives may have their share of bottlenecks. With technologies like AI or IoT, organizations can find alternatives at home thereby reducing dependability while also building a sturdy supply-chain. While banning applications may not be a starting point to speculate around politics, it has clearly stirred up conversation and to an extent also action in adopting automation at scale. In case you’re still stuck at the door, I suggest you check out the detailed report on adopting Automation in the Post COVID era right here. References: COVID-19 – Tipping point for automation. (2020, April 15). NASSCOM Community |The Official Community of Indian IT Industry. https://community.nasscom.in/communities/covid-19/automation-impact-on-jobs-assessing-possibilities-of-greater-automation-and-more-jobs.html Where does India’s ban on Chinese apps fit into the global trade debate?(n.d.). The Wire. https://thewire.in/tech/india-china-apps-global-trade-debate You have been blocked. (n.d.). You have been blocked. https://www.cairn-int.info/article-E_PE_183_0105–the-geopolitics-of-artificial.html Here’s how global supply chains will change after COVID-19. (n.d.). World Economic Forum. https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/05/this-is-what-global-supply-chains-will-look-like-after-covid-19/


Artificial Intelligence and Its Partners

#artificialintelligence

The creation of the Global Partnership on Artificial Intelligence (GPAI) reflects the growing interest of states in AI technologies. The initiative, which brings together 14 countries and the European Union, will help participants establish practical cooperation and formulate common approaches to the development and implementation of AI. At the same time, it is a symptom of the growing technological rivalry in the world, primarily between the United States and China. Russia's ability to interact with the GPAI may be limited for political reasons, but, from a practical point of view, cooperation would help the country implement its national AI strategy. The Global Partnership on Artificial Intelligence (GPAI) was officially launched on June 15, 2020, at the initiative of the G7 countries alongside Australia, India, Mexico, New Zealand, South Korea, Singapore, Slovenia and the European Union. According to the Joint Statement from the Founding Members, the GPAI is an "international and multistakeholder initiative to guide the responsible development and use of AI, grounded in human rights, inclusion, diversity, innovation, and economic growth."


Artificial Intelligence Before Explosion – Here are Promising AI Projects - Intelvue

#artificialintelligence

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is not the one that is borne by the overwhelming science fiction vision. In the near future, we will see almost every area of life in order to make our activities more effective and interactive. According to China's search engine, Baidu's top researcher, "Reliability of speech technology approaches the point we will only use and do not even think about." Andrew Ng says the best technology is often invisible, and speech recognition will disappear in the background as well. Baidu is currently working on more accurate speech recognition and more efficient sentence analysis, which expects sound technologies to be able to interact with multiple devices such as household appliances.


AI Generator Learns to 'Draw' Like Cartoonist Lee Mal-Nyeon in Just 10 Hours

#artificialintelligence

A Seoul National University Master's student and developer has trained a face generating model to transfer normal face photographs into cartoon images in the distinctive style of Lee Mal-nyeon. The student (GitHub user name: bryandlee) used webcomics images by South Korean cartoonist Lee Mal-nyeon (이말년) as input data, building a dataset of malnyun cartoon faces then testing popular deep generative models on it. By combining a pretrained face generating model with special training techniques, they were able to train a generator at 256 256 resolution in just 10 hours on a single RTX 2080ti GPU, using only 500 manually annotated images. Since the cascade classifier for human faces provided in OpenCV-- a library of programming functions mainly aimed at real-time computer vision -- did not work well on the cartoon domain, the student manually annotated 500 input cartoon face images. The student incorporated FreezeD, a simple yet effective baseline for transfer learning of GANs proposed earlier this year by KAIST (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology) and POSTECH ( Pohang University of Science and Technology) researchers to reduce the burden of heavy data and computational resources when training GANs. The developer tested the idea of freezing the early layers of the generator in transfer learning settings on the proposed FreezeG (freezing generator) and found that "it worked pretty well."


Is China Winning the AI Race?

#artificialintelligence

CAMBRIDGE – COVID-19 has become a severe stress test for countries around the world. From supply-chain management and health-care capacity to regulatory reform and economic stimulus, the pandemic has mercilessly punished governments that did not – or could not – adapt quickly. From Latin America's lost decade in the 1980s to the more recent Greek crisis, there are plenty of painful reminders of what happens when countries cannot service their debts. A global debt crisis today would likely push millions of people into unemployment and fuel instability and violence around the world. The virus has also pulled back the curtain on one of this century's most important contests: the rivalry between the United States and China for supremacy in artificial intelligence (AI).


Alibaba Cloud turns on new hyperscale data centres in China

ZDNet

Alibaba Cloud has added three hyperscale data centres in China and plans to build more over the next few years. The move is part of the Chinese tech giant's $28 billion investment to modernise its cloud infrastructure and support customers' digital transformation needs. Located in Hangzhou, the Jiangsu Province's Nantong, and Inner Mongolia's Ulangab, the three new sites run on Alibaba's own technologies including its Apsara Distributed OS, Hanguang 800 AI chip, and X-dragon architecture. The launch was part of its previous announcement to park another $28 billion over three years to build out its cloud infrastructure, the company said in a statement Tuesday. While coy over how the Huawei-US debacle may impact other Chinese technology vendors, Alibaba Cloud executives play up their "in Asia, for Asia" focus and investment in the region as a key competitive advantage over its US competitors, including AWS, Microsoft, and Google.