autonomous driving


Volvo looks to supply Uber with up to 24,000 self-driving cars

The Japan Times

STOCKHOLM/SAN, FRANCISCO – Uber plans to buy up to 24,000 self-driving cars from Volvo, marking the transition of the U.S. firm from an app used to summon a taxi to the owner and operator of a fleet of cars. The nonbinding framework deal could offer San Francisco-based Uber a way to overcome setbacks at its autonomous driving division in Silicon Valley's race to perfect self-driving systems. Combining Volvo's cars with Uber's self-driving system builds on their nearly three-year relationship and comes as Uber's autonomous driving unit has been hit by a lawsuit over trade secrets and the departure of top talent. Automakers, ride-hailing firms and tech start-ups have been forging loose alliances in an effort to advance self-driving technology and claim a piece of what is expected to be a multi-billion-dollar business. Geely-owned Volvo said in a statement on Monday it would provide Uber with its flagship XC90 SUVs equipped with autonomous technology as part of a nonexclusive deal from 2019 to 2021.


Volvo to supply Uber with up to 24,000 self-driving cars

Daily Mail

Uber plans to buy up to 24,000 self-driving cars from Volvo, marking the transition of the U.S. firm from an app used to summon a taxi to the owner and operator of a fleet of cars. The non-binding framework deal could offer San Francisco-based Uber a way to overcome setbacks at its autonomous driving division in Silicon Valley's race to perfect self-driving systems. Combining Volvo's cars with Uber's self-driving system builds on their nearly three-year relationship and comes as Uber's autonomous driving unit has been hit by a lawsuit over trade secrets and the departure of top talent. Uber plans to buy up to 24,000 self-driving cars from Volvo, marking the transition of the U.S. firm from an app used to summon a taxi to the owner and operator of a fleet of cars. Automakers, ride-hailing firms and tech startups have been forging loose alliances in an effort to advance self-driving technology and claim a piece of what is expected to be a multi-billion-dollar business.


Storage will continue to play a role in the advancement of AI: Pure Storage

ZDNet

Storage is an important component underpinning artificial intelligence (AI) and other emerging technologies with similar infrastructure demands, according to Robert Lee, VP and chief architect at Pure Storage, and therefore needs to be included in discussions about such technologies. Lee told ZDNet that significant advancements in technology -- particularly around parallelisation, compute, and networking -- enable new algorithms to apply more compute power against data. "Historically, the limit to how much data has been able to be processed, the limit to how much insight we've been able to garner from data has been bottlenecked by storage's ability to keep the compute fed," said Lee, who previously worked at Oracle before joining Pure Storage in 2013. "Somewhere around the early 2000s, the hardware part of compute, CPUs started getting more parallel. It started doing multi-socket architectures, hyper threading multi-core.


China scours the globe for talent in artificial intelligence, big data

@machinelearnbot

Kevin Du is travelling to the United States this week to visit Harvard Business School. But he has other things on his mind. He plans to make a side trip to other top universities and technology companies, part of his regular day job as a headhunter, looking to rope in engineers, programmers and coders to work in China. China, already the world's largest market for automatons, e-commerce and smartphones, is also the job market for artificial intelligence, big data analytics and robotics. The Chinese government has just unveiled a road map to global dominance in AI by 2030, forecasting the industry to be worth 1 trillion yuan (US$151 billion) by then.


Artificial intelligence in business: Separating the real from the hype

#artificialintelligence

The potential for AI to infuse business and value chains across various industries is greater than ever before--but where should executives start? Typically understood as being all about robots and whiz-bang machines, artificial intelligence (AI) can be tough for executives to wrap their business minds around. In this episode of the McKinsey Podcast, senior partner Peter Breuer and McKinsey Global Institute partner Michael Chui speak with McKinsey Publishing's Simon London about burgeoning business applications of artificial intelligence, the line between hype and true use cases for AI, and how business leaders can separate one from the other. I'm Simon London with McKinsey Publishing. Today, we're going to be talking about artificial intelligence.


Your Guide to Machine Learning at re:Invent 2017 Amazon Web Services

#artificialintelligence

As you plan your agenda, machine learning is undoubtedly a hot topic on your list. This year we have a lot of great technical content in the Machine Learning track, with over 50 breakout sessions, hands-on workshops, labs, and deep-dive chalk talks. You'll hear first-hand from customers and partners about their success with machine learning including Facebook, NVIDIA, TuSimple, Visteon, Matroid, Butterfleye, Open Infuence, Whooshkaa, Infor and Toyota Racing Development. This year we're hosting our inaugural Deep Learning Summit where thought leaders, researchers, and venture capitalists share their perspectives on the direction in which deep learning is headed. In addition you can take part in our deep-learning-powered Robocar Rally.


Nissan tests self-driving cars on Japanese roads

ZDNet

Nissan is testing self-driving vehicle prototypes on public roads in Tokyo, Japan. On Monday, the Japanese automaker said that the technology behind the trials is ProPILOT, an autonomous vehicle system being pushed towards Level Four capabilities which, while not truly anonymous, will offer driver-assist functionality in new models. Nissan tested the latest evolution of ProPILOT on a modified INFINITI Q50 sports sedan, which uses data collected from 12 sonars, 12 cameras, nine millimeter-wave radars, six laser scanners and mapping technology which collates this information to build a map of the driver's environment, possible obstacles, and hazards in real-time. The car would be capable of taking control of the trip and -- hopefully -- safely delivering driver and passengers to their destination. The company claims the technology provides a "human-like driving feel that gives passengers peace of mind."


Preparing Self-Driving Cars for the Wild World of Developing Cities

WIRED

Self-driving cars are no longer confined to controlled test tracks or even to placid suburban streets--they're tackling real traffic in US cities such as New York, San Francisco, and Pittsburgh. They're honing their skills amidst humans in Europe, South Korea, Singapore, and Japan. They're preparing for the day they can purify our chaotic streets with their robotic perfection. Learning how to drive in places like unruly Boston, a land of creative left turns and seemingly optional yields, comes with its challenges. Even Patriots fans look like goody two-shoes compared to drivers who have little to zero respect for lanes, traffic signals, warning signs, and speed limits.


Apple co-founder 'The Woz' slams Tesla's Autopilot

Mashable

Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak is super keen on futuristic electric cars, but doesn't yet trust Tesla's autonomous driving technology. "The Woz," who drives a Tesla Model S, is concerned some people are mistaking Tesla's current Autopilot system as a completely capable self-driving program. In reality, Tesla's Autopilot feature is classified by the federal government as a "level two" autonomous driving system, which means the car is only partially automated, meaning it will steer itself, accelerate, and decelerate -- but the driver must always be prepared to take control of the vehicle. "Tesla has in people's mind that they have cars that will just drive themselves totally, and it is so far from the truth, so they have deceived us," Wozniak told CNBC at this week's 20/20 Money conference in Las Vegas. To Wozniak, the word "autopilot" is deceiving and potentially dangerous.


Delphi buys nuTonomy to bolster its self-driving car efforts

Engadget

Delphi is already a significant player in the self-driving car realm, but it's not taking any chances -- it wants whatever edge it can get. To that end, the GM spinoff just bought the autonomous driving startup nuTonomy for an up-front price of $400 million. The move theoretically "accelerates" Delphi's self-driving car plans (it's their pun, not ours) by giving it more than 100 new employees as well as access to nuTonomy's "full-stack" autonomous driving software. The nuTonomy crew will stay in Boston, where the company and Delphi are running driverless car tests. The two companies expect to have over 60 autonomous rides on the street by the end of 2017, and that's only likely to grow following the deal.