australia


Scientists claim to have developed world's first vaccine with artificial intelligence

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A new flu vaccine designed by artificial intelligence has gone on trial in the United States in what researchers are claiming is a world first. Scientists at Flinders University in Australia have developed what they describe as a "turbo-charged" flu vaccine with an extra component that stimulates the human immune system to make more antibodies against the flu virus than a normal vaccine, thus making it more effective. Nikolai Petrovsky, professor of medicine at Flinders University in Australia and the lead researcher on the vaccine, said that as far as he knew this was the first time a flu vaccine had been developed using AI that had progressed to a trial in humans. He said that the use of AI had accelerated the vaccine discovery process, cut costs massively and had enabled the development of a more effective vaccine. He said using AI streamlined the vaccine development process.


Virtus Health taps into artificial intelligence to improve IVF success rates ZDNet

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Virtus Health has announced in partnership with Harrison-AI and Vitrolife that it will commence randomised controlled trials of its artificial intelligence (AI) technology, called Ivy, by the end of the year. Speaking at The Future of Health event in Sydney this week, Virtus Health group CEO Sue Channon explained the tests will be used to further validate the use of AI when it comes to in-vitro fertilisation (IVF). She explained how for the last 12 months, embryologists have been using Ivy as a supporting tool to increase the potential success of pregnancy through IVF. "At this stage Ivy is still a supporting tool, we're not letting Ivy make the decision on its own," she said, explaining how one patient got pregnant during the cycle that Ivy was used after five unsuccessful IVF cycles. "We are seeing an improvement of pregnancy outcome as a result of Ivy."


Singapore not leveraging enough on AI to improve diagnostic efficiency: Philips FHI 2019

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According to Philips' Annual Future Health Index (FHI) 2019 report, Singapore's healthcare professionals are not yet leveraging Artificial Intelligence (AI) to its full potential for treatment and diagnosis. In the report, it is revealed that healthcare professionals in Singapore are using AI technology more for improving the accuracy and efficiency of administrative tasks such as staffing and patient scheduling (37%) than for diagnosis (28%), flagging patient anomalies (26%) and facilitating remote patient monitoring (25%). The report states that emerging countries that are leading the way for AI use in diagnosis globally with nearly half (45%) of China's healthcare professionals, and more than a third in Saudi Arabia (34%), using AI technology to improve the accuracy of their diagnoses. Additionally, the report also hints that apprehension amongst Singapore's healthcare professionals may be one of the barriers to wider adoption, with one in five (20%) admitting that they fear their long-term job security is threatened by new advancements in healthcare technology, such as AI and telehealth. AI aside, the report highlights that Singapore consistently outperforms its Asia Pacific neighbour Australia and holds its own amongst additional Asian countries that were part of the study in terms of digital technology usage, with 89% of Singapore's healthcare professionals using digital health records in their hospital/practice, compared to 81% in Australia and China, and 76% in India.


From high school English teacher to Software Engineer at a Machine Learning company (Podcast)

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On today's episode of the podcast, I got to chat with software engineer Jackson Bates who lives and works in Melbourne, Australia. Jackson used to be a high school English teacher, but gradually taught himself to code and landed a pretty sweet gig as a React dev, partly by chance. Today he works part time as a developer, part time as a stay at home dad, and volunteers his time with various open source projects. Jackson grew up in England, and studied English in school. Although going into education seemed a logical choice, he dabbled in other fields - like working at a prison cafeteria - for a while before landing a teaching job.


Artificial Intelligence Predicts El Niño Redbrick Sci&Tech

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Researchers from China and South Korea have created an AI that can predict El Niño up to 18 months before it occurs. El Niño is a weather event that can occur every 2-7 years, where the area of warmer water in the western Pacific Ocean around Australia spreads across the Pacific. This leads to warmer air rising across the Pacific, causing severe rainfall and drastically changing wind direction and strength across the Pacific. This has huge knock on effects on weather worldwide. El Niño can cause colder winters in northern Europe and droughts in countries such as Australia and Malaysia.


Most Canadians are worried AI is advancing too quickly, and they expect banks to have the answers, says study

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By Howard Solomon A new report highlights a growing fear among Canadians that's tied to the rapid advancement of artificial intelligence. An online study conducted by Environics Research Group revealed that 77 per cent of Canadians are concerned that AI is advancing too quickly to properly understand its potential risks. The survey of 1,200 Canadians was sponsored by TD Bank back in May, and also indicated a growing concern around biases in how the technology is developed. Additionally, sixty per cent of Canadians worry about a lack of diversity in the growing field of AI. The results don't shock Tomi Poutanen, chief AI officer for TD and co-founder of Layer 6, but he said they do signal a growing awareness of AI's transformative capabilities, and people are looking to banks to validate its adoption.


Canberra Gives AU$32m for Autonomous Decision-Making Research

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The governmenbt of Australia is subsidizing the study of responsible, ethical, and inclusive autonomous decision-making technologies. The Australian government is providing AU$31.8 million to the Australian Research Council to study responsible, ethical, and inclusive autonomous decision-making technologies. The Center of Excellence for Automated Decision-Making and Society, which will be based at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT), will house researchers who will work with experts from seven other Australian universities, as well as 22 academic and industry partner organizations in Australia, Europe, Asia, and the U.S. The global research project aims to ensure machine learning and decision-making technologies can be used safely and ethically. Said RMIT researcher Julian Thomas, "Working with international partners and industry, the research will help Australians gain the full benefits of these new technologies, from better mobility, to improving our responses to humanitarian emergencies."


PAID POST by IBM -- Driving A.I. Acceptance: Learning From Mia and Marge

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Fledgling gal-bots are the latest hires in the virtual assistant landscape. Meet Mia and Marge: two virtual assistants in the banking world – each brought into existence by women, both of whom carry deep institutional knowledge, subject matter expertise and long-standing credibility. UBank's Lee Hatton (Mia) and The Royal Bank of Scotland's (RBS) MaryAnn Fleming (Marge) are among 40 women who have been recognized as 2019's women leaders in A.I. by IBM. These leaders have succeeded in garnering acceptance of A.I. in the workplace, elevating their customers' experience and their companies' brands. It seems mortgage consumer complaints consistently surface around the loan application process according to UBank CEO, Lee Hatton.


Digital dystopia: how algorithms punish the poor

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All around the world, from small-town Illinois in the US to Rochdale in England, from Perth, Australia, to Dumka in northern India, a revolution is under way in how governments treat the poor. You can't see it happening, and may have heard nothing about it. It's being planned by engineers and coders behind closed doors, in secure government locations far from public view. Only mathematicians and computer scientists fully understand the sea change, powered as it is by artificial intelligence (AI), predictive algorithms, risk modeling and biometrics. But if you are one of the millions of vulnerable people at the receiving end of the radical reshaping of welfare benefits, you know it is real and that its consequences can be serious – even deadly.


Digital dystopia: how algorithms punish the poor

The Guardian

All around the world, from small-town Illinois in the US to Rochdale in England, from the Pacific shore of Perth, Australia, to Dumka in northern India, a revolution is under way in how governments treat the poor. You can't see it happening, and may have heard nothing about it. It's being planned by engineers and coders behind closed doors, in secure government locations far from public view. Only mathematicians and computer scientists fully understand the sea change, powered as it is by artificial intelligence (AI), predictive algorithms, risk modeling and biometrics. But if you are one of the millions of vulnerable people at the receiving end of the radical reshaping of welfare benefits, you know it is real and that its consequences can be serious – even deadly.