astronaut


Space Station gets new floating robo-camera ball

Daily Mail

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has unveiled the first images captured by its spherical camera drone on the International Space Station. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has unveiled the first images captured by its spherical camera drone on the International Space Station. The camera ball uses 3D printed internal and external components, and uses drone technology such as Miniaturized Attitude Control Sensors and Actuators in an'All-in-one Module.' The camera ball uses 3D printed internal and external components, and uses drone technology such as Miniaturized Attitude Control Sensors and Actuators in an'All-in-one Module.'


Meet the International Space Station's adorable camera drone

Engadget

Astronauts on board the International Space Station have a new robotic companion to play around with. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has released the first images shot by the "Int-Ball," a spherical camera that floats around alongside the rest of the crew. JAXA says crew members spend 10 percent of their working hours with a camera in hand, photographing work or equipment that requires further evaluation. A floating camera drone could, in theory, alleviate the crew of that responsibility, giving them more time to conduct experiments and carry out repairs.


Flight plan for Apollo 13 mission goes on sale for £30,000

Daily Mail

Apollo 13 was to be the third mission to land on the moon, but just under 56 hours into flight, an oxygen tank explosion forced the crew to cancel the lunar landing and move into the Aquarius lunar module to return back to Earth. The drama that unfolded during the Apollo 13 mission was re-told in the Hollywood film starring Tom Hanks, Kevin Bacon as Swigert and the late Bill Paxton as Haise. The flight plan for the ill-fated Apollo 13 mission which had to be drastically altered following the'Houston, we have had a problem' emergency on board has been unearthed The Apollo 13 mission which set off on April 11, 1970 was meant to culminate in a third moon landing, with Lovell and Haise voyaging to the lunar surface while Swigert orbited in the command module Odyssey. But just under 56 hours into the mission, an oxygen tank explosion resulted in a major loss of electrical power to the command and service module, forcing the crew to cancel the lunar landing and move into the Aquarius lunar module.


Nasa speaks out over 'Anonymous' video claiming it is about to reveal aliens

The Independent

It also took caviar, ready for the satellite's inhabitants to celebrate the holidays X-rays stream off the sun in this image showing observations from by NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, overlaid on a picture taken by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) This near-infrared color image shows a specular reflection, or sunglint, off of a hydrocarbon lake named Kivu Lacus on Saturn's moon Titan Although Mimas and Pandora, shown here, both orbit Saturn, they are very different moons. Mimas (246 miles or 396 kilometers across), a "medium-sized" moon, formed into a sphere due to self-gravity imposed by its higher mass An X1.6 class solar flare flashes in the middle of the sun in this image taken 10 September, captured by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory An image from Nasa's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) shows a 200,000 mile long solar filament ripping through the Sun's corona in September 2013 An image of the Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy seen in infrared light by the Herschel Space Observatory. Nasa's Hubble Space Telescope has unveiled in stunning detail a small section of the Veil Nebula - expanding remains of a massive star that exploded about 8,000 years ago Four images from New Horizons' Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) were combined with colour data from the Ralph instrument to create this enhanced colour global view of Pluto The HiRISE camera aboard Nasa's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter acquired this closeup image of a "fresh" (on a geological scale, though quite old on a human scale) impact crater in the Sirenum Fossae region of Mars. "And as we know from experience, NASA's scientific discoveries of today continually drive impactful research for tomorrow that goes far beyond the initial observations."


Why Anonymous claims Nasa is about to announce the discovery of aliens

The Independent

It also took caviar, ready for the satellite's inhabitants to celebrate the holidays X-rays stream off the sun in this image showing observations from by NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, overlaid on a picture taken by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) This near-infrared color image shows a specular reflection, or sunglint, off of a hydrocarbon lake named Kivu Lacus on Saturn's moon Titan Although Mimas and Pandora, shown here, both orbit Saturn, they are very different moons. Mimas (246 miles or 396 kilometers across), a "medium-sized" moon, formed into a sphere due to self-gravity imposed by its higher mass An X1.6 class solar flare flashes in the middle of the sun in this image taken 10 September, captured by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory An image from Nasa's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) shows a 200,000 mile long solar filament ripping through the Sun's corona in September 2013 An image of the Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy seen in infrared light by the Herschel Space Observatory. Nasa's Hubble Space Telescope has unveiled in stunning detail a small section of the Veil Nebula - expanding remains of a massive star that exploded about 8,000 years ago Four images from New Horizons' Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) were combined with colour data from the Ralph instrument to create this enhanced colour global view of Pluto The HiRISE camera aboard Nasa's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter acquired this closeup image of a "fresh" (on a geological scale, though quite old on a human scale) impact crater in the Sirenum Fossae region of Mars. "And as we know from experience, NASA's scientific discoveries of today continually drive impactful research for tomorrow that goes far beyond the initial observations."


Virtual exploration could be the future of space science

Daily Mail

Scientists say humans in orbit could operate robotic systems down at the surface by relying on telepresence, enabling virtual exploration – and, some even say artificially intelligent probes could learn to carry out missions almost entirely on their own. By deploying astronauts to a planet's orbit, such as Mars, humans could control the instruments down below in real-time. And, this would allow them to essentially use a'robotic surrogate' – meaning the researchers could experience the surface environment virtually Curiosity is normally piloted remotely by humans, but signals can take up to 24 minutes to get from Earth to Mars. And, this would allow them to essentially use a'robotic surrogate' – meaning the researchers could experience the surface environment virtually, through the eyes of the robot, and carry out investigations through this vessel.



NASA Astronauts On ISS To Make Emergency Spacewalk Tuesday To Replace Faulty Component

International Business Times

A multiplexer-demultiplexer (MDM) data relay box aboard the International Space Station failed Saturday, and will be replaced Tuesday during a spacewalk by NASA astronauts Peggy Whitson and Jack Fischer, the space agency announced Sunday. Whitson prepared a spare data relay box Sunday morning, and tested its components. In the two hours or so that the spacewalk will last, Whitson -- designated as extravehicular crewmember 1 and wearing a suit with red stripes -- will replace the data relay box while Fischer -- designated as extravehicular crewmember 2 and wearing a suit with no stripes -- will perform the additional task of installing a pair of wireless communication antennas on the Destiny Lab. The installation of the antennas was originally scheduled for May 12, when Whitson and Fischer conducted the space station's 200th spacewalk.


Orbiting 'Mars base camp' planned for 2028

Daily Mail

This isn't possible when the rover and scientist are on different planets, creating a delay in the decision process, said Dr Ben Clark, chief scientist on the Lockheed Martin team studying the Mars Base Camp. It came as Nasa continued to investigate a request from Donald Trump's administration to asses the feasibility of sending a crew around the moon with the first flight of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft. 'Nasa has [orbiting Mars] in their plan,' Lockheed Martin's chief technologist for civil space exploration Tony Antonelli told Popular Science at the time. NASA continues to investigate a request from Donald Trump's administration to asses the feasibility of sending a crew around the moon with the first flight of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft Just last week, NASA's top staff was given instructions to assess the feasibility of sending humans to space with the first flight of the Space Launch System rocket and Orion spacecraft.


Get set for Mars base camp

FOX News

The six-person Mars Base Camp is led by researchers at aerospace giant Lockheed Martin, who unveiled the concept last year and fleshed out more details of the project here at the 48th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC), held March 21-25 in The Woodlands, Texas. This work could help identify the best spots for humans to explore on the Martian surface, Lockheed Martin representatives have said. Mars Base Camp astronauts could also interact virtually with Mars surface robots, using technology like that developed at Lockheed Martin's Collaborative Human Immersive Laboratory, Jolly said. On the Mars orbiting complex, crewmembers would be immersed in a continuous data flood from the rovers, and they'd have the feeling of being front and center on Mars, Clark said.