america


US should do more to keep AI lead: Experts

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American universities and corporations are in danger of becoming unwilling partners in dual civil-military use of artificial intelligence (AI) technology by the Chinese government, a Congressional Commission hearing was told on Friday. For now, the United States is well ahead of China in the development of AI - essentially, technology that enables machines to learn like humans and apply what they learn. But to maintain the edge, it must do more to support AI research, and it should also remain open to global talent, experts told the US-China Economic and Security and Review Commission (USCC). "Human talent may be the most valuable input into a nation's AI system," Mr Jeffrey Ding, a researcher at the Centre for the Governance of AI at Oxford University, told the commission. And the US has by far the most talent in that area.


As China Challenges The U.S. in AI, Big Data And Machine Learning Are Reshaping The Energy Industry

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Machine learning, Big Data, and automation are revolutionizing global industry – and the energy sector is no exception. Innovation is driving technological progress, boosting economic efficiency, creating smarter business operations, and leading to more resilient infrastructure. It's why businesses and governments around the world are making advanced technology – including artificial intelligence – a top economic and national security priority. Energy companies are implementation big data and AI in versatile ways – and the sector is growing. The market for AI software in the oil and gas industry is expected to reach a whopping $2.85 billion by 2022.


'Trump Baby' blimp flies in London as protests greet president

The Japan Times

LONDON - Thousands of protesters greeted President Donald Trump's U.K. visit with anger and British irony Tuesday, crowding London's government district while the U.S. leader met Prime Minister Theresa May nearby. Feminists, environmentalists, peace activists, trade unionists and others demonstrated against the lavish royal welcome being given to a president they see as a danger to the world, chanting "Say it loud, say it clear, Donald Trump's not welcome here." "I'm very cross he's here," said guitar teacher Katie Greene, carrying a home-made sign reading "keep your grabby hands off our national treasures" under a picture of one of Queen Elizabeth II's corgis. My sign is flippant and doesn't say the things I'd really like to say." A day of protests began with the flying of a giant blimp depicting the president as an angry orange baby, which rose from the grass of central London's Parliament Square. One group came dressed in the red cloaks and bonnets of characters from Margaret Atwood's "The Handmaid's Tale," which is set in a dystopian, misogynist future America. Demonstrators filled Trafalgar Square and spilled down Whitehall, a street lined with imposing government offices, before marching half a mile to Parliament. Many paused to photograph a robotic likeness of Trump sitting on a golden toilet, cellphone in hand. The robot caught the attention of passers-by with its recitation of catchphrases including "No collusion" and "You are fake news." "It's 16 feet high, so it's as large as his ego," said Don Lessem from Philadelphia, who built the statue from foam over an iron frame and had it shipped by boat across the Atlantic. Lessem, a dinosaur expert who makes models of prehistoric creatures, said "I'm interested in things that are big, not very intelligent and have lost their place in history." "I wanted people here to know that people in America do not support Trump in the majority .


America and its economic allies have announced five "democratic" principles for AI

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The Trump administration might be building walls between America and some countries, but it is eager to forge alliances when it comes to shaping the course of artificial intelligence. The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), a coalition of countries dedicated to promoting democracy and economic development, has announced a set of five principles for the development and deployment of artificial intelligence. The announcement came at a meeting of the OECD Forum in Paris. The OECD does not include China, and the principles outlined by the group seem to contrast with the way AI is being deployed there, especially for face recognition and surveillance of ethnic groups associated with political dissent. Speaking at the event, America's recently appointed CTO, Michael Kratsios, said, "We are so pleased that the OECD AI recommendations address so many of the issues which are being tackled by the American AI Initiative."


Why your next Jeep could be electric: What Fiat Chrysler-Renault merger means for you

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

A link has been posted to your Facebook feed. A budding deal to combine Jeep maker Fiat Chrysler Automobiles and French automaker Renault could make that possibility a reality in the coming years. After years of searching for a partner, Fiat Chrysler may have finally found the one. Less than a year after the death of consolidation promoter and Fiat Chrysler savior Sergio Marchionne, a merger of Fiat Chrysler and Renault is on the verge of happening. Fiat Chrysler on Monday unveiled its proposal to combine the two companies in a 50-50 deal that would carry seismic consequences for the global automotive business.


42 Countries Agree to International Principles for AI

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The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development unveiled the first intergovernmental standard for artificial intelligence policies Wednesday--and the organization's 36 member countries including America have initially signed on along with Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Peru and Romania. OECD, an international forum that unites stakeholders from many nations to work together to address challenges of globalization, released "Recommendations of the Council on Artificial Intelligence" to help foster a global policy ecosystem that leverages the evolving technology's benefits, while also protecting human rights and democratic values. OECD's Director of the Science, Technology and Innovation Directorate Andrew Wyckoff told reporters that the principles' creators hope they'll help shape a stable regulatory environment that promotes the tech's positive uses, while withstanding unethical abuses. "AI is what we would call a'general purpose technology.' It's going to change the way we do things in nearly every single sector of the economy--that's part of the reason we give so much importance to its development," he said.


42 Countries Agree to International Principles for Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development unveiled the first intergovernmental standard for artificial intelligence policies Wednesday--and the organization's 36 member countries including America have initially signed on along with Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Peru and Romania. OECD, an international forum that unites stakeholders from many nations to work together to address challenges of globalization, released "Recommendations of the Council on Artificial Intelligence" to help foster a global policy ecosystem that leverages the evolving technology's benefits, while also protecting human rights and democratic values. OECD's Director of the Science, Technology and Innovation Directorate Andrew Wyckoff told reporters that the principles' creators hope they'll help shape a stable regulatory environment that promotes the tech's positive uses, while withstanding unethical abuses. "AI is what we would call a'general purpose technology.' It's going to change the way we do things in nearly every single sector of the economy--that's part of the reason we give so much importance to its development," he said.


Are ethics keeping pace with technology?

Robohub

At the same time, my relaxed post-vacation disposition was quickly rocked by the news of the day and recent discussions regarding the extent of AI bias within New York's financial system. These unrelated incidents are very much connected in representing the paradox of the acceleration of today's inventions. Last Friday, The University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) became the first hospital system to safely transport, via drone, a live organ to a waiting transplant patient with kidney failure. The demonstration illustrates the huge opportunity of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) to significantly reduce the time, costs, and outcome of organ transplants by removing human-piloted helicopters from the equation. As Dr. Joseph Scalea, UMMC project lead, explains "There remains a woeful disparity between the number of recipients on the organ transplant waiting list and the total number of transplantable organs. This new technology has the potential to help widen the donor organ pool and access to transplantation."


Bengio and Marcus at World AI Summit in Montréal

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Almost a thousand attendees filled the century-old St James Theater in the heart of Old Montréal for the World Summit AI Americas. Held April 10 – 11, the conference welcomed AI leaders from industry and academia, who shared their AI experiences, insights, and analysis. Sessions included deep dive tech talks that broke down technical details for a general knowledge audience, as well as detailed use cases examining practical applications of AI in enterprise and how the tech has transformed business. There were also workshops hosted by startups, scale-ups and unicorns; which addressed challenges such as machine learning in drug development, the use of AI for social good, and how governments can harness the power of AI to improve infrastructure. On day one attendees filled the main conference room to hear Turing Award 2018 Honoree Yoshua Bengio.


Asia Times The coming technological cold war Opinion

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Lurking behind the Trump administration's trade conflict with China lies an abiding fear that the United States could be losing its advantage in the global technology race. In US policymaking circles more broadly, China's "Made in China 2025" policy – intended to ensure Chinese dominance in cyber capabilities, artificial intelligence (AI), aeronautics, and other frontier sectors – is viewed not just as an economic challenge, but as a geopolitical threat. Everything from US telecommunications infrastructure and intellectual property to America's military position in East Asia are considered to be at risk. The fact that technology is driving geopolitical tensions runs against the predictions of many scholars and policymakers. As recently as the mid-2000s, some suspected that geography would no longer play a meaningful role in the functioning of global markets.