Goto

Collaborating Authors

airport


Study finds 195 robot deployments worldwide in response to the pandemic

#artificialintelligence

Over 66 different kinds of "social" robots have been piloted in hospitals, health centers, airports, office buildings, and other public and private spaces in response to the pandemic, according to a study from researchers at the Autonomous University of Barcelona and Pompeu Fabra University. Their survey of 195 robot deployments across 35 countries including China, the U.S., Thailand, and Hong Kong found "clear expansion" in the use of robots that perform roles directly addressing the need for distancing and physical isolation, like those that support hospital staff and deliver food. It's not surprising the worsening COVID-19 health crisis is hastening the adoption of certain robots and drones. They require disinfection but promise to minimize the risk of spreading disease, which is critical in health care settings. The European Center for Disease Prevention and Control estimates that health care workers represent over 25% of diagnosed COVID-19 cases in some parts of the world.


This AI system locates drone pilots flying too close to airports

#artificialintelligence

Scientists have built an AI tool that finds drone pilots flying dangerously close to airports or protected airspace. The system aims to reduce the risks drones pose to aircraft. Not only can they collide with planes, but they can also interfere with radio signals, causing a pilot to lose control of the aircraft. These risks have already caused chaos at a number of airports. Most notoriously, London's Gatwick airport was forced to shut down in December 2018 after drones were spotted near the runway.


Researchers Use AI to Spot Drone Pilots

#artificialintelligence

Law enforcement and military personnel might finally have a way to track malicious drones and prevent millions of dollars in damage thanks to new artificial intelligence research. Academics at Israel's Ben-Gurion University of the Negev have developed a way to locate the operator of a drone by looking at how the airborne vehicle moves. Locating the pilots of malicious drones is a pressing issue. In December 2018, Gatwick Airport had to close its runways to avoid drones flying dangerously close. Officers believed that it was a deliberate attack on the airport.


Researchers Use AI to Spot Drone Pilots

#artificialintelligence

Law enforcement and military personnel might finally have a way to track malicious drones and prevent millions of dollars in damage thanks to new artificial intelligence research. Academics at Israel's Ben-Gurion University of the Negev have developed a way to locate the operator of a drone by looking at how the airborne vehicle moves. Locating the pilots of malicious drones is a pressing issue. In December 2018, Gatwick Airport had to close its runways to avoid drones flying dangerously close. Officers believed that it was a deliberate attack on the airport.


Researchers learn how to pinpoint malicious drone operators

ZDNet

Researchers have come up with a way to pinpoint the location of drone operators seeking to cause harm or disruption in protected airspace. Simple steps can make the difference between losing your online accounts or maintaining what is now a precious commodity: Your privacy. In 2018, the chaos that can be caused by drone operators near sensitive areas -- such as military bases or airports -- was highlighted by the Gatwick drone incident, in which the UK airport was forced to close for 33 hours between December 19 and 21. The airport was inundated with passengers attempting to fly, made busier due to the Christmas rush, and had to cancel flight after flight due to a rogue unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). In total, 140,000 passengers were impacted by a drone, or several, that were spotted at various locations including runways.


Face Recognition: How it Works

#artificialintelligence

For related products, scroll to the end. You might have heard about how fingerprinting is used to identify someone's identity by comparing this person's fingerprint with other previously stored fingerprints. If you have seen movies, you have probably seen how effective this method can be to solve criminal cases. If you have gone through airports, your fingerprints might have been taken for security purposes. Besides fingerprinting, there is a new technique to identify people based on their faces.


AI Facial Recognition: Balancing Privacy Concerns

#artificialintelligence

Nowadays, face recognition systems have become an integral part of our lives. Research shows that a face plays a significant role while interacting with people, as it elucidates people's identity, making facial recognition systems a crucial aspect of security solutions in many organizations. As of today, many corporate and government firms are rapidly adopting the face recognition technology across the world due to its invulnerability to threats, reliability, and identifying criminals. Moreover, the face recognition systems provide vast benefits as compared to other biometric security solutions i.e palm print and fingerprint. To have a deep knowledge of how facial recognition systems work is vitally important in order to explore the technical, social, and cultural implications of these systems. Let's exemplify a bit how a facial recognition system works!


Hawaii Is Finally Making It Easier for Tourists to Visit. Is That Smart?

Slate

Hawaii is ready for its midpandemic tourism boom. Starting on Aug. 1, tourists looking to visit Hawaii will be able to bypass the state's two-week quarantine requirement for arrivals by getting a negative COVID-19 test within 72 hours before landing in the state. Visitors can also have their quarantines cut short if they receive negative test results during those two weeks. The same rules will also apply to residents returning to the islands. Hawaii won't pay for the tests; travelers will have to handle that themselves before departure, though screeners will still administer temperature checks at airports.


Artificial intelligence to be a seismic technology for aviation

#artificialintelligence

In all areas – efficiency and effectiveness, revenue generation, safety and security – AI has tremendous potential to deliver positive change if used correctly, details Ian Law, Chief Information Officer of San Francisco International Airport. As hubs of intense operational activity involving thousands of inter-dependent tasks, airports are ideal candidates for new technologies that improve the smooth flow of people, planes and bags. Artificial intelligence (AI) could be a game-changer for airports. However, without some (human) intelligent forethought, it also risks being a costly disappointment. The real value of AI will only come from a sector-wide focused collaboration, from which AI's cornerstone role tackling the sector's most intractable issues is evolved.


Coronavirus: How air passengers can stay safe

BBC News

Thermal-imaging cameras and swab tests for coronavirus are not "clinically valuable" in airports, according to a panel of aviation health experts. About one in every three infectious people would be missed, they say. Air systems and low humidity on planes already reduces virus spread through the cabin. But passengers should wear face coverings at all times, board and disembark one row at a time and be seated apart from others if possible. And those seated at the back should be the first on and last off.