airport


DHS wants to ramp up use of facial recognition at airports from just 15 to almost all in 4 years

Daily Mail

Despite concerns over facial recognition's impact on civil liberties, public agencies have continued to apply the tool liberally across the U.S. with one of the biggest deployments coming to an airport near you. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) said that it plans to expand its application of facial recognition to 97 percent of all passengers departing the U.S. by 2023, according to the Verge. By comparison, facial recognition technology is deployed in just 15 airports, according to figures recorded at the end of 2018. In what is being referred to as'biometric exit,' the agency plans to use facial recognition to more thoroughly track passengers entering and leaving the country. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) said that it plans to expand its application of facial recognition to 97 percent of all passengers departing the U.S. by 2023 The system functions by taking a picture of passengers before they depart and then cross-referencing the image with a database containing photos of passports and visas.


Gatwick drone attack could have been inside job, say police

The Guardian

The drone attack that brought Gatwick airport to a standstill last December could have been an "inside job", according to police, who said the perpetrator may have been operating the drone from within the airport. Sussex police told BBC Panorama that the fact an insider may have been behind the attack was "treated as a credible line of enquiry from the earliest stages of the police response". Gatwick's chief operating officer, Chris Woodroofe, believes the perpetrator was familiar with the airport's operational procedures and had a clear view of the runway or possibly infiltrated its communication network. "It was clear that the drone operators had a link into what was going on at the airport," he told Panorama, in his first interview since the incident. He said the culprit had carefully picked a drone that would remain undetected by the airport's DJI Aeroscope detection system being tested at the time.


Gatwick drone attack possible inside job, say police

BBC News

The drone attack that caused chaos at Gatwick before Christmas was carried out by someone with knowledge of the airport's operational procedures, the airport has said. A Gatwick chief told BBC Panorama the drone's pilot "seemed to be able to see what was happening on the runway". Sussex Police told the programme the possibility an "insider" was involved was a "credible line" of inquiry. About 140,000 passengers were caught up in the disruption. The runway at the UK's second busiest airport was closed for 33 hours between 19 and 21 December last year - causing about 1,000 flights to be cancelled or delayed.


BrainCorp brings its autonomous robot tech to your local supermarket

Engadget

We often frame new automation technology as a grave and immediate threat to the jobs and livelihoods of the humans whose tasks the machines take over. Tell that to the custodians at Sea-Tac airport who no longer have to spend their nights scrubbing floors, or sales associates at your local supermarket who will no longer have to schlep carts full of products throughout the store thanks to BrainCorps' smart scrubbers and tugs. BrainCorp is an AI software developer based in San Diego, California. Founded in 2009, the company spent half a decade developing its computer vision and automation technology before pivoting into the floor care industry. This service sector "hadn't seen a lot of automation yet or at least successful automation of the products," John Black, Brain Corp's Senior Vice President of New Product Development, told Engadget.


Travelers reporting computer system outages at airports across the country

FOX News

Travelers at major airports across the country are reporting on computer outages causing delays across multiple airlines. Passengers began taking to Twitter around 11 a.m. EST on Tuesday, complaining of delayed flights and computer outages affecting American Airlines, Alaska Airlines and JetBlue. American Airlines has since confirmed the outages, attributing them to a "technical issue" caused by the Sabre computer systems, which are used by "multiple carriers." Shortly after 11:30 a.m., the airline stated that the issue had been resolved. "Earlier today, Sabre had a brief technical issue that impacted multiple carriers, including American Airlines. This technical issue has been resolved. We apologize to our customers for the inconvenience."


Baristas beware: A robot that makes gourmet cups of coffee has arrived.

Washington Post - Technology News

In the food industry, it seems, the robot revolution is well underway, with machines mastering skilled tasks that have always been performed by people. In Boston, robots have replaced chefs and are creating complex bowls of food for customers. In Prague, machines are displacing bartenders and servers using an app. Robots are even making the perfect loaf of bread these days, taking charge of an art that has remained in human hands for thousands of years. Now comes Briggo, a company that has created a fully automated, robotic brewing machine that can push out 100 cups of coffee in a single hour -- equaling the output of three to four baristas, according to the company.


Slate's Mistakes for the Week of March 18

Slate

In a March 21 Slatest, Mark Joseph Stern misstated that the April 2019 Wisconsin Supreme Court election could give Democratic justices a majority. That opportunity will not arise until the 2020 election. Due to an editing error, a March 20 Future Tense Newsletter incorrectly stated that the National Institute of Standards and Technology has been using nonconsensually obtained images to train its Facial Recognition Verification Testing program. The NIST does not develop or train facial recognition systems. It provides independent government evaluations of prototype face recognition technologies.


We have to find a way to stop drones disrupting airports

New Scientist

In the past four months, airports have been brought to a standstill by the sight of drones hovering above runways. Last week, rules came into force in the UK that make it illegal to fly drones within 5 kilometres of an airport. But is there anything more we can do to stop them becoming a weaponised nuisance?


Robot valets are parking cars at an airport in France

Engadget

After a few years of testing its robot valets, Stanley Robotics will officially put its fleet to use at France's Lyon-Saint-Exupéry airport this week. If you plan to park in the robot-lot anytime soon, you'll leave your car in a special garage-like box. One of Stanley's robots will literally pick up your car and deliver it to a spot. When you return, the system will use your flight information to determine when to bring your car back to a box, where you can pick it up and drive off. As the company says, that should mean no waiting or searching the parking lot.


Commuters to pay for train fare with their face in China: Report

ZDNet

Those catching a train in Shenzhen may soon be able to pay for their fare through facial recognition, with a trial of the technology reportedly under way. It is one of the various technologies backed by the ultra-fast 5G network being tested by the local Shenzhen subway operator, according to the South China Morning Post. The initiative under way at Futian Station sees commuters scan their faces on a tablet-sized screen mounted on the entrance gate. The fare is then automatically deducted from a linked account. According to the report, there are currently 5 million rides per day on the city's network.