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AI news: CBI urges creation of AI commission in 2018

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The CBI (Confederation of British Industry) is asking the government to launch an AI commission in 2018 to examine the effect of artificial intelligence on jobs. The CBI, an organisation that speaks on behalf of 190,000 businesses across the UK, has released a report titled'Disrupting the Future' which highlights how firms and the government must pave the way for the adoption of new technologies. It has called on the government to establish a joint commission in early 2018 involving business, employee representatives, academics and a minister to examine the impact of AI on people and jobs. It also hopes the commission will be able to set out an action plan to outline how to raise productivity, spread prosperity and open up new paths to economic growth. Josh Hardie, CBI deputy director-general, said: "The UK must lead the way in adopting these technologies but we must also prepare for their impacts.


Investors eye Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning Made in Switzerland

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Artificial intelligence (AI) is set to substantially disrupt the financial services industry, transforming how we bank, invest, and get insured. AI refers to machines that are capable of performing specific tasks that normally require human intelligence such as visual perception, speech recognition, decision-making, and language translation. AI and related technologies are made possible by the colossal volumes of data we are able to collect and process. AI has been all the buzz these past few years, and according to CB Insights, AI startups raised over US$2 billion in 2016 alone. In the area of financial services, AI is expected to bring major shifts in financial institutions' workforces.


Researchers analyze Kuroda's facial microexpressions to predict central bank policy moves

The Japan Times

For decades, economists have tried to guess central bank policy direction by studying subtle changes in official language -- now, researchers are finding new clues on policy, not in the words of central bankers but in their faces. In Japan, two artificial intelligence researchers, one from Nomura Securities and the other from Microsoft, are using software to analyze split-second changes in the facial expressions of Bank of Japan Gov. Haruhiko Kuroda at his post-meeting news conferences. Their study found that Kuroda showed fleeting signs of "anger" and "disgust" at news conferences that preceded two recent major policy changes -- the January 2016 introduction of negative interest rates and the adoption of the so-called yield curve control policy in September last year. The implication is that Kuroda was beginning to sense the constraints of existing policies about six or seven weeks before the central bank's board actually decided to change them, the researchers concluded. The research was presented last weekend to a subcommittee meeting of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence (JSAI).


BBC will use machine learning to cater to what audiences want to watch

@machinelearnbot

Today, BBC's R&D team announced a five-year initiative to use machine learning to work out what audiences want to watch. To accomplish this, the team is partnering up with data scientists and experts from UK universities as well as media and tech companies based in Europe and internationally. The Data Science Research partnership intends to create "a more personal BBC" that can entertain in new ways. Researchers will analyze user data and apply algorithms to get marketing and media insights about audiences' preferences. The details are vague for now, but the team says it plans to use machine learning on its own digital and traditional broadcasting content to gain new insights.


In Kuroda's face - researchers find ways to predict central bank changes

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TOKYO (Reuters) - For decades, economists have tried to guess central bank policy direction by studying subtle changes in official language -- now, researchers are finding new clues on policy, not in the words of central banker but in their faces. In Japan, two artificial intelligence researchers, one from Nomura Securities and the other from Microsoft (NASDAQ:MSFT), are using software to analyze split-second changes in the facial expressions of Bank of Japan Governor Haruhiko Kuroda at his post-meeting press conferences. Their study found that Kuroda showed fleeting signs of "anger" and "disgust" at news conferences that preceded two recent major policy changes -- the January 2016 introduction of negative interest rates and the adoption of the so-called "yield curve control" policy September last year. The implication is that Kuroda was beginning to sense the constraints of existing policies about six or seven weeks before the central bank's board actually decided to change them, the researchers concluded. The research was presented last weekend to a subcommittee meeting of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence (JSAI).


Australian government awards AU$5.9m in R&D grants to support defence operations

ZDNet

The Australian government has announced awarding five organisations with Defence Innovation Hub grants worth AU$5.9 million. Western Australia-based L3 Oceania has secured a AU$2.9 million contract to explore the development of an underwater acoustic sensor, while the University of Newcastle will explore the development of virtual reality-based resilience training programs for Australian Defence Force (ADF) personnel under a AU$2.2 million contract. Agent Oriented Software from Victoria has been awarded a AU$378,000 grant to explore the concept of an "autonomous teamed intelligent software agent capability resilient to cyber-attacks"; Explosive Protective Equipment from Queensland received a AU$242,000 grant to explore the integration of a Cobham Amulet Ground Penetrating Radar into an existing unmanned ground vehicle for the detection of improvised explosive devices; and Griffith University received a AU$183,000 grant to explore the development of a portable device that enables real-time detection of airborne biological threats. "These investments will drive growth in defence industry and innovation whilst focusing on the capability needs required to ensure Australia's national security now and into the future," Minister for Defence Industry Christopher Pyne said in a statement on Friday. Launched in December last year, the Defence Innovation Hub has invested about AU$20 million to industry and research organisations, Pyne said.


Ethics by numbers: How to build machine learning that cares News & Analysis

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Machine learning algorithms work blindly towards the mathematical objective set by their designers. It is vital that this task include the need to behave ethically. Such systems are exploding in popularity. Companies use them to decide what news you see and who you meet online dating. Governments are starting to roll out machine learning to help deliver government services and to select individuals for audit.


Martin Brossman Addresses Artificial Intelligence and Your Future in Science Talk at St. Andrews University - Press Release - Digital Journal

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A basic understanding of how it is affecting our culture is critical for business, students, sales representatives and professionals. It is a topic that inspires St. Andrews alumnus Martin Brossman to gather big-picture insights which he will share in his presentation at noon on Friday, October 20 in LA104 on the Laurinburg campus. "There has never been any other time in life when so many aspects of our world are focused on advancing artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning as today," Martin Brossman said, "I believe students and professionals need a basic understanding of how Machine Learning and AI are progressing today because its influence on our life is growing rapidly. As our world gets more automated and AI gains greater dominance in our society, working on enhancing our best human qualities will give us a competitive advantage." About the Friday Science Series "Friday Science at St. Andrews seminar series consists of a seminar most Friday's of each semester.


Dogs are more expressive when people are paying attention

Mashable

Want to see some serious puppy dog eyes? Try spending more time near your pooch. Sure, new toys and food are nice, but research from the University of Portsmouth shows that like most humans, what dogs really crave is attention. In fact, scientists at the university's Dog Cognition Centre recently found that dogs are more likely to show facial expressions if humans are paying attention to them. SEE ALSO: This poop pad will clean up your dog's mess for you In the study -- which was published in Scientific Reports -- dog cognition expert Dr. Juliane Kaminski and a team tested how dogs' facial expressions changed in response to four different factors: a human facing them or turned away from them either with food or without.


Dogs really can smell your fear, and then they get scared too

New Scientist

Dog owners swear that their furry best friend is in tune with their emotions. Now it seems this feeling of interspecies connection is real: dogs can smell your emotional state, and adopt your emotions as their own. Science had already shown that dogs can see and hear the signs of human emotions, says Biagio D'Aniello of the University of Naples "Federico II", Italy. But nobody had studied whether dogs could pick up on olfactory cues from humans. "The role of the olfactory system has been largely underestimated, maybe because our own species is more focused on the visual system," says D'Aniello.