Information Technology: Overviews


FAQ on the newly established MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing

MIT News

This set of FAQs offers information about the founding of the MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing, announced today, and its implications for the MIT community and beyond. Q: What is MIT announcing today that's new? A: Today MIT is announcing a $1 billion commitment to address the global opportunities and challenges presented by the ubiquity of computing -- across industries and academic disciplines -- and by the rise of artificial intelligence. At the heart of this endeavor will be the new MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing, made possible by a foundational $350 million gift from Stephen Schwarzman, the chairman, CEO, and co-founder of Blackstone, a leading global asset manager. An additional $300 million has been secured for the College through other fundraising.


Frequently Asked Questions about Machine Learning

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A: Our machine learning process is based on academic research and has been rigorously tested. Working with AMS as an external third party, we can handle the full end-to-end research process. We can identify the sites to mine based on our experience, mine the data, clean the data to prepare it for the machine, train the dataset to optimize the power of machine learning, and run the machine. Once the machine has been run, we take the output and our trained analysts convert it into detailed insights. We also present the findings in a rich qualitative report with quotations that bring the insights to life.


An Overview of Artificial Intelligence Ethics and Regulations

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In the past 18 months, we have seen a huge rise in the interest of AI development and activation. Countries are developing national strategies, and companies are positioning themselves for the fourth industrial revolution. With this pervasive push of AI, comes also an increased awareness that AIs should act in the interest of a human - and this is not as trivial as one might think. This article provides an overview of several key initiatives that propose ways on approaching AI ethics, regulation and sustainability. As this is a fast evolving field, I aim to update this article regularly.


Global Healthcare Artificial Intelligence Market Estimated to Grow at a CAGR of 52% by 2022 -Know the Future Opportunities and Current Trends

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The Healthcare Artificial Intelligence Market research report tries to understand the pioneering tactics taken by vendors in the global market to offer product differentiation through Porter's five forces analysis. It also points out the ways in which these companies can reinforce their stand in the market and increase their revenues in the coming years. Ongoing industrial advancements and the persistent penetration of Internet in the remote corners of the world are also responsible for the noteworthy growth of the Global Healthcare Artificial Intelligence Market. This Healthcare Artificial Intelligence market intelligent report highlights on the key retailers in this market everywhere throughout the world. This domain of the report contains the business formats, insurance, and product illustrations, volume, generation, contact statistics, price, and revenue.


Deep Learning in Neuroradiology

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SUMMARY: Deep learning is a form of machine learning using a convolutional neural network architecture that shows tremendous promise for imaging applications. It is increasingly being adapted from its original demonstration in computer vision applications to medical imaging. Because of the high volume and wealth of multimodal imaging information acquired in typical studies, neuroradiology is poised to be an early adopter of deep learning. Compelling deep learning research applications have been demonstrated, and their use is likely to grow rapidly. This review article describes the reasons, outlines the basic methods used to train and test deep learning models, and presents a brief overview of current and potential clinical applications with an emphasis on how they are likely to change future neuroradiology practice. Facility with these methods among neuroimaging researchers and clinicians will be important to channel and harness the vast potential of this new method. Deep learning is a form of artificial intelligence, roughly modeled on the structure of neurons in the brain, which has shown tremendous promise in solving many problems in computer vision, natural language processing, and robotics.1 It has recently become the dominant form of machine learning, due to a convergence of theoretic advances, openly available computer software, and hardware with sufficient computational power. The current excitement in the field of deep learning stems from new data suggesting its excellent performance in a wide variety of tasks. One benchmark of machine learning performance is the ImageNet Challenge. In this annual competition, teams compete to classify millions of images into discrete categories (tens of different kinds of dogs, fish, cars, and so forth).


42 Cutting Edge Facts About the Past, Present and Future of Artificial Intelligence

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People have been dreaming about Artificial Intelligence for hundreds, if not thousands of years. Well, it's starting to feel like the future is actually here, and AI can be seen almost everyone nowadays. So how should you feel about it? Here are 42 facts about the past, present and future of artificial intelligence to help you decide for yourself. In Ancient Greek mythology, the blacksmith god Hephaestus was believed to have built what were essentially robots. His "automatons," as they were called, were crafted from metal and designed to perform different tasks for him or other gods.


EurAI Advanced Course on AI, 27-31 Aug 2018

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Artur Garcez gave a lecture on Relational Neuro-Symbolic AI at the EurAI Advanced Course on AI, 2018, which took place in beautiful Ferrara, Italy. All the lectures, with overarching theme Statistical Relational AI, are available from the University of Ferrara's YouTube channel: https://youtu.be/KeFhKi-tOTs?list Artur Garcez gave two talks: Part 1 gives an overview of two decades of research on neuro-symbolic AI. Part 2 describes in some detail two neuro-symbolic systems for relational learning: Connectionist ILP and the Logic Tensor Networks framework.


Top September Stories: Essential Math for Data Science: Why and How; Machine Learning Cheat Sheets

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Here are the most popular posts in KDnuggets in September, based on the number of unique page views (UPV), and social share counts from Facebook, Twitter, and Addthis. Most Shareable (Viral) Blogs Among the top blogs, here are the 5 blogs with the highest ratio of shares/unique views, which suggests that people who read it really liked it. You Aren't So Smart: Cognitive Biases are Making Sure of It, by Matthew Mayo A Winning Game Plan For Building Your Data Science Team, by William Schmarzo What on earth is data science?, by Cassie Kozyrkov Everything You Need to Know About AutoML and Neural Architecture Search, by George Seif The Data Science of "Someone Like You" or Sentiment Analysis of Adele's Songs, by Preetish Panda How many data scientists are there and is there a shortage?, by Gregory Piatetsky Neural Networks and Deep Learning: A Textbook, by Charu Aggarwal 5 Resources to Inspire Your Next Data Science Project, by Conor Dewey Hadoop for Beginners, by Aafreen Dabhoiwala 6 Steps To Write Any Machine Learning Algorithm From Scratch: Perceptron Case Study, by John Sullivan Deep Learning for NLP: An Overview of Recent Trends, by Elvis Saravia (*) Ultimate Guide to Getting Started with TensorFlow, by Brian Zhang (*) How many data scientists are there and is there a shortage?, by Gregory Piatetsky Essential Math for Data Science: 'Why' and'How', by Tirthajyoti Sarkar Journey to Machine Learning - 100 Days of ML Code, by Avik Jain You Aren't So Smart: Cognitive Biases are Making Sure of It, by Matthew Mayo Neural Networks and Deep Learning: A Textbook, by Charu Aggarwal (*) You Aren't So Smart: Cognitive Biases are Making Sure of It, by Matthew Mayo How many data scientists are there and is there a shortage?, by Gregory Piatetsky You Aren't So Smart: Cognitive Biases are Making Sure of It, by Matthew Mayo A Winning Game Plan For Building Your Data Science Team, by William Schmarzo What on earth is data science?, by Cassie Kozyrkov Everything You Need to Know About AutoML and Neural Architecture Search, by George Seif The Data Science of "Someone Like You" or Sentiment Analysis of Adele's Songs, by Preetish Panda You Aren't So Smart: Cognitive Biases are Making Sure of It, by Matthew Mayo What on earth is data science?, by Cassie Kozyrkov


Machine learning and AI – ensuring fairness in smart cities

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Digital technologies and AI offer a new wave of opportunities to turn data into actionable insights – creating a balance between social, environmental, and economic opportunities. In 2018, it's safe to say that the Internet, the World Wide Web, and the myriad of technologies derived from their development are all here to stay. With the ceaseless amalgamation of these various innovations, engineers are creating a cyber-physical world where pervasively interconnected objects, things, and processes can potentially unlock a breadth of unprecedented opportunities. However, I should point out that encapsulating the entire medley of possibilities afforded by these technologies is a considerable endeavour requiring a far longer and more comprehensive overview – perhaps in the form of a book, or three – than this article can offer in isolation. More specifically, I'll be focusing on the potential for us to optimally – and transparently – manage and operate city-wide infrastructure.


A Data-Efficient Framework for Training and Sim-to-Real Transfer of Navigation Policies

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Learning effective visuomotor policies for robots purely from data is challenging, but also appealing since a learning-based system should not require manual tuning or calibration. In the case of a robot operating in a real environment the training process can be costly, time-consuming, and even dangerous since failures are common at the start of training. For this reason, it is desirable to be able to leverage \textit{simulation} and \textit{off-policy} data to the extent possible to train the robot. In this work, we introduce a robust framework that plans in simulation and transfers well to the real environment. Our model incorporates a gradient-descent based planning module, which, given the initial image and goal image, encodes the images to a lower dimensional latent state and plans a trajectory to reach the goal. The model, consisting of the encoder and planner modules, is trained through a meta-learning strategy in simulation first. We subsequently perform adversarial domain transfer on the encoder by using a bank of unlabelled but random images from the simulation and real environments to enable the encoder to map images from the real and simulated environments to a similarly distributed latent representation. By fine tuning the entire model (encoder + planner) with far fewer real world expert demonstrations, we show successful planning performances in different navigation tasks.