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GE Aviation, Auterion partner on full stack platform for drone operators, manufacturers

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GE Aviation and Auterion said they will partner to build a full stack platform for drone manufacturers and operators looking to scale commercial drone operations. The partnership will bring together GE Avaiation's Aircraft System avionics platform and Auterion's Enterprise PX4 operating system, combining airborne autopilot and application computing hardware, flight management, safety management and integration. GE Aviation is providing the avionics hardware, application computing, flight management and integration into airframes. Meanwhile, Auterion's operating system, which runs on-vehicle, in the cloud and in the ground station, provides core software infrastructure including flight peripherals and camera integrations, data networking, precision navigation and compliance with traffic management. GE Aviation and Auterion tested the hardware and software platform over the last three weeks at Reno-Stead airport in Nevada.


Will keyboards be obsolete soon, as voice tech takes over?

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Sure, I talk to Cortana on Windows 10 from time to time, and I would really struggle to write this post without clacking away on the keyboard on my laptop. But a new survey says that voice is the new media we should all adopt before its too late. Atlanta-based voice authentication platform Pindrop recently conducted a consumer survey to find out how they interact with their devices. It conducted 4,057 online interviews in September 2018 to examine the current and future usage of voice technology, and explore its impact on people's lives. The survey shows that almost two out of three (63%) of the population are already using their voice to interact with devices and appliances, and 53 % plan to use voice even more in a year's time.


Build 2019: Microsoft wants to help business users build customized digital assistants

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Last year at its Build developer conference, Microsoft gave quite a bit of time on Day 1 to a conceptual demo about meetings of the future. In that demo, futuristic Cortana-enabled conferencing capabilities figured heavily as did Cortana integration with Teams, Outlook and Windows. This year at Build, a more business-first Cortana plus various bot and virtual assistant services, also look to be on the agenda. Microsoft has been honing its "conversation as a service"/bot pitch since at least 2016. A quick look at this year's published Build 2019 sessions shows that Cortana isn't totally out of the picture, despite its falling far behind Alexa and Google Assistant in terms of usage and mindshare.


Michael Dell: Technology must reflect our humanity and our values

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Michael Dell, CEO of the group of companies under the banner of Dell Technologies, has shared his vision for a future built by technologists, to be consumed by "re-imagined" organisations in areas such as healthcare or government. What is AI? Everything you need to know about Artificial Intelligence The chief used his Dell Technologies World day one keynote to appeal to the contemplative side of those in the technology space, sharing his company's culture of "technology optimism" and asking others to approach the future in a similar way. "Humankind has made astonishing progress in the last few decades ... nothing short of miraculous, but it was all a pre-game show; the next three decades will hold more progress than ever before," he said. The real progress, Dell said, rejecting the technology gimmicks that often hold airtime, will be advancements such as the eradication of deafness and blindness, mostly through artificial intelligence (AI). "A new age of miracles is literally around the corner," Dell said.


All that glitters is not quantum AI

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Why hasn't the field of artificial intelligence created the equivalent of human intelligence? Is it because the problem, "artificial general intelligence," isn't well understood, or is because we just need much faster computers, specifically quantum computers? The latter view is the source of a vibrant field of research, "Quantum Machine Learning," or QML. But a bit of skepticism is warranted. "We need to look through a skeptical eye at the idea that quantum makes things faster and therefore can make machine learning advances," says Jennifer Fernick, the head of engineering at NCC Group, a cyber-security firm based in Manchester, U.K. Fernick was a keynote speaker a week ago at the O'Reilly A.I. conference in New York.


Robots threaten middle-aged workers the most (that's anyone over 21)

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Gallows humor, they call it. "A robot will do my job soon," they say, as they toil in their factory or lawyer's office. For many, it's hard to imagine what they might do next, except, in a fanciful thought, train as a mechanic fixing robots. Yet the more optimistic sorts claim that automation will bring new jobs, new ways and new opportunities to improve life for all. I was a little downcast, therefore, to read three recent papers by two influential economists, Daron Acemoglu of MIT and Pascual Restrepo of Boston University.


Lenovo taps IBM's cognitive and blockchain tools to improve customer service

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Lenovo is turning to its longstanding partnership with IBM to improve its customer service with blockchain and AI-powered tools. Under the new, multi-year agreement, Lenovo will use IBM's tools to assist customer service agents and technicians within the Data Center Group -- supporting Lenovo's ThinkSystem and ThinkAgile platforms. What is AI? Everything you need to know about Artificial Intelligence Lenovo's relationship with IBM dates back to 2005, when the Chinese tech firm acquired IBM's PC business. In 2014, Lenovo purchased IBM's x86 server business. Last year, Lenovo signed a $240 million deal with IBM to improve the customer service experience within its PC division.


MIT finally gives a name to the sum of all AI fears

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Now we know what to call it, that vast, disturbing collection of worries about artificial intelligence and the myriad of threats we imagine, from machine bias to lost jobs to Terminator-like robots: "Machine behaviour." That's the term that researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Media Lab have proposed for a new kind of interdisciplinary field of study to figure out how AI evolves, and what it means for humans. The stakes are high because there is lots of potential for human ability to be amplified by algorithms, but also lots of peril. Commentators and scholars, they write, "are raising the alarm about the broad, unintended consequences of AI agents that can exhibit behaviours and produce downstream societal effects -- both positive and negative -- that are unanticipated by their creators." There is "a fear of the potential loss of human oversight over intelligent machines," and the development of "autonomous weapons" means that "machines could determine who lives and who dies in armed conflicts."


Huawei Cloud ramps up AI efforts with Singapore lab, partners

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Huawei is ramping up its efforts in cloud and artificial intelligence (AI) with the launch of a lab in Singapore and new partnerships in the region to jointly develop applications in these two areas. The Chinese vendor says the new Cloud & AI Innovation Lab aims to build local AI talents and offer resources to help universities and enterprises conduct research and build cloud and AI applications. The facility would provide Huawei's AI services such as research and development robots, development toolkits, and Traffic Intelligent Twins, which taps AI, cloud computing, big data, Internet of Things, and edge computing to help better manage cities, including traffic, emergency response, and public water systems. The lab aimed to cultivate AI talent and "incubate" AI applications, the Chinese vendor said. Country's government has introduced initiatives to train 12,000 people in artificial intelligence skillsets, including industry professionals and secondary school students.


Huawei and 5G: Why the UK ignored US warnings and said yes

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The UK seems set to allow Huawei to provide at least some of the technology to power the country's next-generation 5G mobile networks, despite ongoing warnings from the US about the security risks of allowing the Chinese telecoms company to be involved. Reports suggest that a review of 5G security by the UK government will allow Huawei technology to be used in the edges of these networks but not in the sensitive core, despite the reservations of a number of members of the UK cabinet. At the technology level 5G is important because it will provide the invisible infrastructure for a vast number of future services, from self-driving cars to smart cities and the fast growing Internet of Things. All of these will rely on 5G's ability to connect up millions of devices to share information wirelessly. Using 5G to introduce new services or simply make existing ones more efficient could have substantial economic benefits – and significantly boost the countries at the forefront.