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Robot security guards are already on patrol

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Knightscope's K5 security robot is ready to protect and server. Tony Spitz has the details. A link has been sent to your friend's email address. A link has been posted to your Facebook feed. Knightscope's K5 security robot is ready to protect and server.


Watch 1500 drones fly simultaneously and smash a world record

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In this time-lapse, Intel breaks its own Guinness World Record for the most drones flown simultaneously during its celebration of its 50-year anniversary and they look pretty cool while doing it. A link has been sent to your friend's email address. A link has been posted to your Facebook feed. In this time-lapse, Intel breaks its own Guinness World Record for the most drones flown simultaneously during its celebration of its 50-year anniversary and they look pretty cool while doing it.


Watch this creepy, crawly robot climb up walls

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Rising STAR, the latest robot from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, can shapeshift on its own to conquer tricky obstacles. A link has been sent to your friend's email address. A link has been posted to your Facebook feed. Rising STAR, the latest robot from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, can shapeshift on its own to conquer tricky obstacles.


Elaine Chao on autonomous vehicles, future of roads and drones, more

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Elaine L. Chao sits down with Fortune's Alan Murray at Fortune's 2018 Brainstorm Tech conference. A link has been sent to your friend's email address. A link has been posted to your Facebook feed. Elaine L. Chao sits down with Fortune's Alan Murray at Fortune's 2018 Brainstorm Tech conference.


Camps use facial recognition on kids, raise privacy concerns

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Waldo Photos uses facial recognition technology to identify children at sleep-away camp and send photos of them to their parents. But some privacy advocates say this technology is too new to rush into.


Facial recognition helps mom and dad see kids' camp photos, raises privacy concerns for some

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A photo from a summer camp posted to the camp's website so parents can view them. Venture capital-backed Waldo Photos has been selling the service to identify specific children in the flood of photos provided daily to parents by many sleep-away camps. Camps working with the Austin, Texas-based company give parents a private code to sign up. When the camp uploads photos taken during activities to its website, Waldo's facial recognition software scans for matches in the parent-provided headshots. Once it finds a match, the Waldo system (as in "Where's Waldo?") then automatically texts the photos to the child's parents.


So how good are the Amazon Prime Day deals? Just don't ask Alexa

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LOS ANGELES -- The "deals" for Amazon Prime Day are everything we expected. Great, generous discounts on Amazon's own products, close-outs on Amazon and other brands' products that didn't do well, and so-so deals on a lot else. The surprise: It wasn't possible to see some of these purported deals early on. We didn't foresee Amazon not being able to handle the traffic to shop, and having much of the website down for over three hours Monday. More: Which Kindle should I buy?


Amazon Echo vs. Dot? Show vs. Spot? How to make sense of Amazon's smart speakers

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USA Today's Jefferson Graham suggests tips on the best way to shop through Amazon's home assistant, Alexa. LOS ANGELES -- With seven different choices in its Amazon Echo family, consumers are naturally confused about which smart speaker, if any, to buy. The entry-level Dot is the most affordable and Amazon's best seller, but has the worst sound. The video versions of Echo haven't caught on, but are now costing about the same as the regular, full-featured Echo. USA TODAY is here to help, with a guide to all seven speakers, pros and cons on each, and a summation at the end.


Microsoft raises alarms about face recognition

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Facial recognition technology is useful to some, unnerving to others and is the latest Facebook privacy criticism. It's the first big tech company to raise serious alarms about an increasingly sought-after technology for recognizing a person's face from a photo or through a camera. Microsoft President Brad Smith said in a blog post Friday that the government should form a bipartisan expert commission. Many uses of facial recognition technology are "positive and potentially even profound," Smith said. "But other potential applications are more sobering.


Venmo, Zelle and Cash App are tops in mobile peer-to-peer payments: A Foolish Take

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Millennials have it so easy… not so long ago you'd see a group of people in a restaurant doing some ridiculous math equation to split a bill, but now there's apps like Venmo that make everything much much easier. A user receives funds from a friend for Burning Man festival expenses via Venmo. More Americans are paying each other via mobile apps than ever. From 2018 to 2021, the total value of mobile peer-to-peer (P2P) transactions in the U.S. could rise from $156.49 billion to $244.03 billion, according to eMarketer. The firm also recently identified the three leading apps in that market: PayPal's (NASDAQ: PYPL) Venmo, Square's (NYSE: SQ)Cash App, and Zelle.