Slate


I Think of Truly, Truly Terrible Things to Climax During Sex

Slate

How to Do It is Slate's sex advice column. Send your questions for Stoya and Rich to howtodoit@slate.com. I have been sexually active since I was 17. I am now 29 years old. A majority of the sex I had between 17 and 21 was only when I was drunk, so I don't remember most of it, but I know I didn't climax.


Drone Pilots Deserve Privacy Too

Slate

Who's flying that drone over my house, and what exactly are they looking for? Is the pilot a police officer, a search-and-rescue volunteer, or Creepy Steve from four doors down? These concerns over the origin and intention of small drones have bedeviled the drone industry for as long as it has existed. Our inability to figure out who is piloting the weird quadcopter over our neighborhoods surely has a lot to do with why so many still distrust drones. People are working on it, though.


What's Going On With the Teenager Suing Apple Over Facial Recognition Technology?

Slate

Ousmane Bah, an 18-year-old college student from New York, filed a lawsuit against Apple on Monday for allegedly relying on facial recognition systems that misidentified him as a serial shoplifter. The suit claims that Apple and its contractor, Security Industry Specialists, caused Bah to suffer emotional distress as a result. Apple has subsequently denied that it uses facial recognition in its stores. According to the lawsuit, Bah received a summons arraignment last summer from a Boston municipal court for the theft of $1,200 worth of products from an Apple Store in the city. The police report indicated that a Security Industry Specialists loss prevention associate saw the theft on a security video and recognized Bah from a similar incident at an Apple Store in Connecticut.


Organizers of the Google Walkout Say They've Been Threatened With Demotion

Slate

On the first day of November last year, some 20,000 Google employees at more than 40 offices across the world staged a walkout protesting how the company had dealt with serious accusations of sexual assault and harassment and what many employees described as a culture of impunity for executives. The event was planned by a core group of seven organizers who work at Google. On Monday, two of those women, Meredith Whittaker and Claire Stapleton, shared examples of retaliation they've face from the company since on a Google-internal mailing list. Wired first reported the two were facing blowback from Google for helping to organize the protest. Stapleton is a 12-year veteran at Google.


Who Is the Beard Guy Standing Next to the Attorney General? Explained.

Slate

Attorney General William Barr's press conference about the imminent release of the redacted Mueller report raised as many questions as it answered. Among those questions: Who is that bearded gentleman standing next to the attorney general and U.S. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein? On Twitter, viewers of the press conference scratched their heads (and chins) in confusion. The man was described as a flushed cater waiter or Jason Sudeikis look-alike, but nevertheless a hard-ass worthy of respect. The public consensus was approving--aroused, even.


Read a Searchable Version of the Mueller Report

Slate

On Thursday, Attorney General William Barr released a redacted version of the report produced by special counsel Robert Mueller. And strikethroughs look particularly bad!) You can also download the document to search it at your leisure. Disclaimer: This version of the Mueller report was processed using the Recognize Text feature of Adobe Acrobat Pro Version 2019.010.20099 The PDF was then exported into Microsoft Word.


Ethics Alone Can't Fix Big Tech

Slate

The New York Times has confirmed what some have long suspected: The Chinese government is using a "vast, secret system" of artificial intelligence and facial recognition technology to identify and track Uighurs--a Muslim minority, 1 million of whom are being held in detention camps in China's northwest Xinjiang province. This technology allows the government to extend its control of the Uighur population across the country. It may seem difficult to imagine a similar scenario in the U.S., but related technologies, built by Amazon, are already being used by U.S. law enforcement agencies to identify suspects in photos and video. And echoes of China's system can be heard in plans to deploy these technologies at the U.S.-Mexico border. A.I. systems also decide what information is presented to you on social media, which ads you see, and what prices you're offered for goods and services.


Pete and Chasten Buttigieg's em Other /em Potential First: a White House App Marriage

Slate

It's common knowledge that Barack Obama met the woman who eventually became his wife, Michelle Robinson, when he came to work at her law firm as a summer associate. George W. Bush met the future Mrs. Bush, who was Laura Welch back then, at a barbecue and took her mini-golfing the next day. And we all remember that Bill and Hillary Clinton were law school sweethearts. The historical record is full of these president-and-first-lady origin stories: Harry Truman was just 6 when he met the woman he would go on to marry, in church. So it's only natural to ask how the current crop of presidential candidates' how-they-met stories stack up.


A Jock With Glasses Is Not a Geek, but Gay Culture Sure Is Trying to Make It So

Slate

You've probably heard of the idea of a queer "scene," perhaps most often from people who don't care for it. But what, exactly, is this scene? Is there more than one? What happens when a scene evolves--or when it doesn't? These are the questions we've gathered a group of writers to consider for an Outward special issue on "The Scene" in LGBTQ life today.


Taylor Swift Is Counting Down to Something

Slate

At midnight on Friday, pop singer Taylor Swift updated her official website with a giant countdown clock, which will reach zero at 12:00 a.m. The internet has been ablaze with rumors ever since the countdown clock appeared, most of which revolve around the idea that Swift might be releasing new music on the 26th. But students of history and students of the Assassin's Creed video game series recognize that the situation is far grimmer than even the lead-up to the release of Reputation. April 26 is the anniversary of the Pazzi's attack on the Medici outside the Duomo in Florence, making it an apt day for betrayals and treason. And this isn't the first time a monomaniacal multi-millionaire with a love of gadgets, a passion for revenge, and a stockpile of diamonds has started a ticking clock.