PBS NewsHour


Ask the Headhunter: Why recruiters aren't always good for the economy

PBS NewsHour

New research and analysis from Federal Reserve economists reveal a problem of mismatches between workers, salaries and productivity, but doesn't identify and discuss the structural cause of the problem: counterproductive recruiting, writes Ask the Headhunter columnist Nick Corcodilos.


Uber supends self-driving vehicle program following Arizona accident

PBS NewsHour

A self-driven Volvo SUV owned and operated by Uber Technologies Inc. is flipped on its side after a collision in Tempe, Arizona, U.S. on March 24, 2017. Picture taken on March 24, 2017.


Typing sentences by simply thinking is possible with new technology

PBS NewsHour

JUDY WOODRUFF: For decades, researchers have worked to create a better and more direct connection between a human brain and a computer to improve the lives of people who are paralyzed or have severe limb weakness from diseases like ALS.


Why did humans evolve big brains? We don't know, but math can help

PBS NewsHour

Our brains have a finite capacity for processing information and for remembering, and the bigger the brain, the more oxygen and sugar it takes to maintain.


Amazon releases Echo data in murder case, dropping First Amendment argument

PBS NewsHour

The Amazon Echo, a voice-controlled virtual assistant, is seen at its product launch for Britain and Germany in London, in 2016.



5 stories from last week that deserve a second look

PBS NewsHour

The word "Disagree" is seen on the hand of Julia Grabowski during a town hall meeting for Republican U.S. Senator Bill Cassidy in Metairie, Louisiana.


A short history of AI schooling humans at their own games

PBS NewsHour

Garry Kasparov plays a move against Deep Blue in their first game in Feb. 1996.