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Learn to analyze and visualize data with Python during this $30 training

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As 2020 has clearly shown us, nobody can actually predict the future. But there are some people who come pretty close, and their profession may surprise you. Data scientists (yes, you read that right) can practically predict the future of certain industries using big data and a coding language called Python. Knowing that, it's not hard to see why Glassdoor named data scientists the third most desired job in the US, with over 6,500 openings, a median base salary of $107,801, and a job satisfaction rate of 4.0. If you're looking for a new career path with a handsome salary and the ability to basically predict the future, check out this e-book and course bundle to get started.


Learn to make 3D video games — no coding experience required

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TL;DR: Create your own 3D video game with The Complete GameGuru Bundle for $29.99, an 85% savings as of July 2. Every video game fan, at some point, has dreamt of making their own. But, of course, there are quite a few obstacles to such a dream. Fortunately, a lack of programming skills doesn't have to be one of them. With the Complete GameGuru Bundle, even complete coding novices can create their very own 3D video games. Designed for gaming enthusiasts without programming or design expertise, GameGuru is a non-technical and fun game maker that makes the game creation process easy and enjoyable.


6 of the best robot lawn mowers for lazy gardeners

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For some, mowing the lawn is a pleasant experience. For others, it absolutely sucks. If you're an enthusiastic member of the latter category, a robot lawn mower may be an investment to consider. Once set up, they'll allow you to step back from lawn maintenance pretty much entirely. Think of robot mowers as Roombas for lawns, just way more expensive and definitely for outdoor use only.


8 actually good things about dating in 2020, so far

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When I reflected on the past decade of dating at the end of 2019, none of us had any idea what was in store for us at the start of this year. Take your mind on a journey back to the far-off time of last year. Dating was still considered to be a bad time by many. Online dating and apps -- now the most popular way couples meet -- had long been blamed for hookup culture and fostering an environment where ghosting ran amok. If people (by and large men) weren't ghosting, then they were probably sending messages horrible enough to warrant public shaming.


The best weird social distancing tech of 2020 so far

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Humans are social animals, which is why we can use all the non-human help we can get in our attempts to stop the spread of coronavirus by staying six feet away from each other. To meet the current moment, companies and crafty individuals have developed a number of technological innovations to encourage and enforce social distancing. Some are delightfully low-tech, some are alarmingly intelligent, and others are straight up silly. With cases surging in the U.S. and no vaccine in the in sight, the need to stay socially distant will continue even as people's determination wanes. That's what the robots are for.


This sloth robot could help (very slowly) save our planet

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Look up, because the Atlanta Botanical Garden is getting a cute friend. For the next few months, visitors will find a new sloth lingering in the trees -- a new sloth robot, to be exact. Developed by engineers at the Georgia Institute of Technology, SlothBot is a three-foot long, solar-powered robot that monitors temperature, weather, carbon dioxide levels, etc. over the area it looms over. Magnus Egerstedt, one of the robot's engineers, said his creation is designed to mimic and embrace the slowness of a real sloth. The idea, he added, is so that it can conserve energy and survey its environment over long periods of time -- months, or even years.


Amazon gets serious about self-driving cars by dropping more than $1 billion on Zoox

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Amazon, like Waymo, Uber, and Tesla, appears to want to build fleets of autonomous cars. The retail giant acquired self-driving startup Zoox for more than $1 billion, The Information reported Friday. The Financial Times has a similar report, claiming that the actual value of the acquisition is more than $1.2 billion. Zoox itself confirmed the news in an Instagram post. "We are delighted to announce that Zoox is teaming up with @amazon. We have made great strides in creating autonomous mobility from the ground up, and are excited to continue working with our exceptionally talented team to realize that vision," the post says.


Playing 'Breath of the Wild' wrong was the best decision I made during social distancing

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When I play video games, I have a bad habit of taking quest instructions too seriously. When they tell me, like they do in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, to please hurry in my journey to save the princess, I haul ass to get that princess saved. It's possible that I do this because I've played too many games where waiting is actually detrimental to the game's ending, but the more likely reason is that I'm high strung. It is a terrible time to be high strung. The general sense of tension or unease I experience just waking up and brushing my teeth has become the default state of the world under threat from the novel coronavirus, and social distancing alone in one of New York's hardest-hit neighborhoods has done absolutely nothing to assuage me.


Seth Meyers blasts Trump as a 'one-man super spreader' of coronavirus

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"At what point can we say Trump is actively putting people in harm's way?" asked Late Night host Seth Meyers on Thursday. "He holds indoor rallies, refuses to wear a mask, and wants to cut back on testing. While numerous other countries have successfully suppressed their coronavirus outbreaks, the pandemic has reached a new peak in the U.S. The country recorded 39,327 new cases on Thursday, beating the previous single-day record set on Wednesday. Meanwhile, Trump's administration intends to stop funding coronavirus testing sites at the end of June. "That's like a pilot turning off the seatbelt sign after they graze a mountain," said Meyers. "'Don't worry folks, we just nicked one of the Rockies.


Congress needs to pass this facial recognition ban now

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Earlier this year, for the first time (that we know of), a false match by a facial recognition algorithm led to the arrest of an innocent man. Now, members of Congress are finally taking action. Pramila Jayapal and Ayanna Pressley, all Democrats, introduced the Facial Recognition and Biometric Technology Moratorium Act of 2020. It's the most aggressive move yet by Congress to limit the use of facial recognition by police, in this case, by banning federal law enforcement from using it and cutting off state and local police from federal grants if they fail to do the same. That it was an innocent Black man who was falsely accused and arrested is not a surprise.