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This robot pizza company's delivery trucks can now bake 120 pizzas per hour

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The robots are hungry for more pizza. Zume Pizza, the Silicon Valley startup that uses robots (with some human assistance) to assemble pizzas ordered via its app, is now delivering even more pies -- cooked while en route to customers. Using the company's patented "Baked on the Way" technology and the delivery truck's six ovens, pizza-makers can bake up to 120 pizzas per hour. Zume CEO Alex Garden called the operation "basically a restaurant on wheels" in a call about expanded delivery areas in the Bay Area and the revamped delivery vehicles. The pizza restaurant has officially partnered with food equipment supplier Welbilt to outfit delivery trucks with high-efficiency ovens.


Amazon is giving Alexa a kid-friendly personality

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As a parent, I'm constantly listening to -- and a bit wary of -- how my kids are talking to Alexa. Or more precisely, how Amazon's digital assistant is talking to them. Ask for the wrong song or overhear the wrong news story, and suddenly my son or daughter might be exposed to something I might not be comfortable with them hearing. And even when the content isn't an issue, I sometimes wonder if Alexa's generally cold, utilitarian manner is giving them the wrong impression of how to answer questions. SEE ALSO: What would an Amazon Alexa robot look like?


Curious about AI? Take an online class in machine learning.

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We may not have reached the age where we can drive flying cars just yet, but that doesn't mean the age of AI isn't already here. You've probably been encountering AI-driven things more than you realize. Perhaps Netflix has recommended a show or film you've always been meaning to watch. Or your GPS has saved you from sitting in hours of traffic. Or maybe your text messaging app has already predicted what you're going to say next.


Robot mascot allows 14-year-old boy to virtually attend football match

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A 14-year-old boy with multiple health conditions was given the chance to be the mascot for a football match on Monday -- by using an iPad linked to a specially-designed miniature robot. SEE ALSO: This soccer player has started celebrating goals by doing the dances in'Fortnite' The white device in the photo below is known as a "telepresence robot". It was used during a match between Everton FC and Manchester City on Monday night to give Jack McLinden the chance to be the first ever "virtual matchday mascot", according to a story on Everton's official club website. The first ever virtual mascot... Everton make Premier League history with a touch of class as their young mascot couldn't attend the game, but is able to watch the full thing from his iPad #EVENEW pic.twitter.com/ncqPsAmPHe The robot has a built-in camera, speaker and microphone.


What would an Amazon Alexa robot look like?

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Alexa may be getting some legs. A domestic robot powered by Amazon's digital assistant looks to be in the cards now that Bloomberg is reporting the e-commerce giant is developing some kind of automated servant for the home. Amazon is well on its way to creating prototypes of the robot, according to the report, with the aim to have it in consumers' homes as early as next year. The exact goal of the project, said to be codenamed "Vesta," is unclear, but smart money is on some kind of mobile Alexa speaker that can move from room to room, extending the digital assistant's presence in a home. The idea is it would be equipped with sophisticated computer-vision capabilities so it could navigate a home like a Roomba robot vacuum.


Bumble wants you to know that it's definitely not a hookup app

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Whatever you do, do not call Bumble a hookup app. The dating app appears to be doubling down on branding itself as a destination for finding "empowered and lasting connections," rather than "hookups." SEE ALSO: Bumble counters Tinder's parent company lawsuit on patent infringement A new survey of Bumble's users reveals that 85 percent say they're "looking for marriage or a boyfriend/girlfriend." The survey also found that less than 4 percent of men and less than 1 percent of women on the app "are looking for a hookup," and 25 percent of users say they "went on a first date with someone they met on Bumble in the last month." The survey results also play up the popular dating app's defining feature -- that only women users can start conversations with matches -- as an example of how the app has "empowered" women in online dating. "Female Bumble users are empowered and ready to make the first move.


Apple's recycling robot rips apart old iPhones to recover valuable materials

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Daisy is a recycling robot that Apple built to retrieve valuable materials from old iPhones. Capable of recovering components from nine different iPhone models, the robot succeeds where traditional recyclers fail, enabling a more efficient recycling process.


How this AI platform is taking over the business world

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Despite the pop culture fiction that artificial intelligence is a far-away puzzle just waiting to be unlocked, the truth is that AI is already a tool that most use often, some of us even every day. Just think about it: every time you stop to ask Siri or Google Home or any of our friendly neighborhood pocket assistants for directions or help finding the nearest coffee spot, you're interfacing with an elegant example of easy-to-use AI. For businesses, using chatbots as the first line of defence against customer complaints is now common, providing a handy way to triage queries and customer needs. Again, AI is already an efficient solution to an everyday problem. And while it's easy to imagine moments where the lives of everyday people intersect with artificial intelligence, and even find examples of our interactions with AI within smaller businesses, for global enterprises the reality of large-scale AI has yet to unfold.


Swiping sucks, so here are 6 dating sites for guys to find love

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As a 2017 study points out, we used to end up with people who we were somehow connected to, whether friends of friends, classmates, or neighbors. Online dating, however, changed the game, and people who meet through tech-based dating tend to be total strangers. It's not easy to get to know someone through an app, and if you're looking for a relationship, tech-based dating usually means wading through hundreds of profiles looking for a casual fling. If you're a guy looking for love, here are six dating apps and sites that will help you find "the one" -- you just might have to do a lot of searching, first. Coffee Meets Bagel may appeal to singles who are tired of endlessly swiping without any feedback or interest from others.


'Westworld' creators confirm robots poop, and other Season 2 info I guess

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Ever since Philip K. Dick first asked the question Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and inspired countless sci-fi classics like Blade Runner, we've wondered about a much more important question regarding artificial biology. SEE ALSO: 'Westworld' mobile game already available in Australia Luckily, the creators of Westworld took the time to answer our pressing questions about synthetic bowel movements. And, well, it does not disappoint. Entertainment Weekly asked the showrunners of HBO's sci-fi hit, Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy, a simple question about what the physical limitation of the hosts were. The hosts are basically organic.