FOX News


Rep. Lee Zeldin: Democrats in impeachment probe are cherry-picking what to leak

FOX News

House Democrats leading the Trump impeachment inquiry are "cherry-picking what to leak," House Foreign Affairs committee member Congressman Lee Zeldin, R-N.Y., claimed Saturday. Appearing on "Fox & Friends: Weekend" with host Ed Henry, Zeldin said Democrats aren't being upfront with the American public. They're lying about other claims and the American public gets completely deceived as a result of it," he said. At a fiery rally in Louisiana on Friday, the president hit back at Democrats' "witch hunt." This is one of the great con jobs ever. We must never let it happen to another president. This should never be allowed to happen again," he told his crowd of supporters.


Army brings AI to electronic warfare

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Surrounded by enemy fire, trapped in a valley between mountains and unable to use certain sensors, drones, fire-control and radar applications, a forward-positioned Army infantry unit suddenly finds itself with no radio, sensors, electronics... or GPS. Their communications are jammed, disabled and rendered useless, making them isolated and vulnerable to lethal air and ground attacks. Does this outnumbered infantry unit have any options with which to avoid destruction? How can they get air support or armored vehicle reinforcement? This very realistic possible threat scenario, increasingly becoming more ominous with modern technical advances, is precisely why the Army is moving quickly to modernize its arsenal of electronic weapons -- and further integrate them with cyber systems.


Army creates multi-domain task force units in Europe, Pacific

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Fox News Flash top headlines for Oct. 9 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com If land-based precision artillery, maneuvering Air Force fighter jets and Navy destroyers were all able to seamlessly share sensitive targeting information in real time during high-intensity combat, the Pentagon would be closely approaching its currently-envisioned concept of modern joint multi-domain warfare. While elements of this kind of information sharing, of course, already exist, the Department of Defense is currently refining and expanding its concept of joint attack with the intention of reaching an entirely new level of modern operational effectiveness. This not only includes incorporating previously less-impactful warfare domains, such as space, cyber and electronic warfare, but also envisions new dimensions of land, air, surface and undersea integrated attack.


Carol Roth: Ellen DeGeneres and Mr. Rogers -- America just got a reminder about what it means to be human

FOX News

Instead of bowing to pressure, the daytime TV host takes on her critics; reaction on'The Five.' When I was growing up, there was a presence in my life, five days a week that sent me and others around the country, messages of kindness. That presence was Mr. Fred Rogers. Mr. Rogers extolled the virtues of being an individual and caring about others, offering everyone, regardless of their background and based on their humanity, an invitation to "be his neighbor." Our discourse in America has changed a lot in the time we have lost Mr. Rogers.


Rashida Tlaib calls for ban on facial recognition tech after telling Detroit police to hire only black analysts

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Police chief calls Tlaib's comments racist; Democratic strategist Monique Pressley and Blexit Movement founder Candace Owens react. Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., last week responded to backlash after she told Detroit police to hire only black facial recognition analysts, writing in a scathing op-ed that her comments were neither "racist" nor "inappropriate" and pushed further for a total ban of the technology used to identify criminal suspects. "I'm going to call out every injustice I see. It's probably what makes most people uncomfortable when I speak the truth," Tlaib wrote in an op-ed in The Detroit News. "My comments weren't racist, out of order, or "inappropriate." It is inappropriate to implement a broken, flawed and racist technology that doesn't recognize black and brown faces in a city that is over 80% black."


Army pursues new virtual soldier training for future war

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Fox News Flash top headlines for Oct. 8 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com Exploding enemy targets with precision artillery, "lasing" ground targets for drone air attack and waging close-combat urban warfare with hand-carried small arms -- are all scenarios entertained recently in high-tech virtual training wargame designed to closely replicate anticipated future warfare. The exercise, intended to virtually "create" high-threat, multi-domain modern warfare, was intended to move the Army closer to its goal of engineering a new "force-on-force" mobile training technology designed to prepare soldiers for the risks and perils of a new kind of war. "This was a computer-based simulation down to the individual model -- using real-time data and responding in a real-world manner," Col. Chris Cassibry, Maneuver Capabilities Development and Integration Directorate's Concepts Development Division director, recently told reporters.


'Fortnite' company may face class-action lawsuit over claims game as addictive as cocaine

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Fox News Flash top headlines for Oct. 8 are here. Check out what's clicking on FoxNews.com The maker of Fortnite may face a class-action lawsuit in Canada after two parents of teenage sons alleged last week the company purposely designed the multiplayer video game to be as addictive as cocaine, according to reports. The Montreal-based law firm, Calex Légal, filed a motion in Quebec Superior Court Thursday on behalf of two parents who approached the firm separately about their 10- and 15-year-old sons, who they claim developed a severe dependence on the game, USA Today reported. The suit, which has yet to be approved by the court, seeks to hold the U.S.-based video game publisher Epic Games Inc., as well as its Canadian affiliate based in British Columbia, accountable for using psychologists and statisticians "to develop the most addictive game possible."


Sen. Tom Cotton: Contraband cell phones in prisons are a threat Congress should act on

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Raw video: Cuyahoga County Jail security footage shows an inmate attempting to catch marijuana and a cell phone that was dropped from a drone. Earlier this year, we learned that Martin Shkreli, a conman and convicted felon, was secretly running an investment company from prison using a contraband cell phone. Shkreli, also known as the "Pharma Bro," achieved infamy in 2015 for jacking up the price of a medicine needed by a small group of very sick patients to enrich himself and his investors. He was convicted of fraud in 2017 and sent to prison. Prison is supposed to keep criminals out of our communities, but as Shkreli's example shows, contraband cell phones allow inmates to continue their crime sprees from behind bars.


Trump-friendly tech guru: Silicon Valley sees China as 'the ultimate business opportunity, not the ultimate adversary'

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At the height of the 2016 presidential contest, then-Facebook executive Palmer Luckey was a Silicon Valley star when he donated $10,000 to an anti-Hillary Clinton group. Six months later, he was out – reportedly fired for his political positions. Now, Luckey runs a new venture, backed by Silicon Valley billionaire Peter Thiel, that is reportedly valued at more than $1 billion. In the new FOX Nation documentary "Artificial Intelligence: The Coming Revolution," Fox Business Network anchor and'Mornings with Maria' host Maria Bartiromo went inside Luckey's Anduril Industries, which is at the forefront of America's race to use artificial intelligence to protect national security. "The thing about the United States is that we are at a strategic disadvantage because of the ethics that we have. We're not willing to play dirty. Russia and China don't have a problem with any of those things," Luckey told Fox Nation.


'FIFA 20' video game glitch exposes players' personal details

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Fox News Flash top headlines for Oct. 4 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com A glitch in the new "FIFA 20" video game has exposed the personal details of a number of players. Game developer EA Sports tweeted on Thursday that some players noticed the leak when they were on the registration portal page for the EA Sports FIFA 20 Global Series competition. Players in the Global Series can qualify to compete in an eWorld Cup tournament.