FOX News


USS Theodore Roosevelt commander says entire crew needs to be isolated after 200 positive coronavirus tests

FOX News

Dr. Nicole Saphire explains the problem asymptomatic individuals present and why we're seeing so many deaths right now Get all the latest news on coronavirus and more delivered daily to your inbox. In a desperate plea for help, the commanding officer of the deployed aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt says his entire crew of roughly 5,000 sailors needs to be isolated after up to 200 onboard have tested positive for coronavirus. Three sailors on board the aircraft carrier tested positive last week, the first time the outbreak infected a deployed U.S. warship at sea. The letter from Captain Brett Crozier to top Navy brass was first obtained by the San Francisco Chronicle. Fox News exclusively reported Sunday there were 38 positive cases aboard the massive warship.


Los Angeles, San Francisco streets and tourist areas largely empty during coronavirus outbreak, video shows

FOX News

Fox News finds the coronavirus outbreak has left San Francisco streets and tourist sites including Chinatown and Fisherman's Wharf largely deserted. Get all the latest news on coronavirus and more delivered daily to your inbox. New drone footage and other video shot by Fox News shows once-busy streets and tourist areas in Los Angeles and San Francisco eerily deserted as the coronavirus has kept people indoors. Fisherman's Wharf, one of San Francisco's busiest tourist areas, once brimming with souvenir shops and seafood stalls and situated near Ghirardelli Square, was shuttered after the city's mayor called for a shelter-in-place, restricting people from leaving their homes except for trips to the grocery store or for medical supplies. The Golden Gate Bridge, which usually has seen over 100,000 cars and other vehicles a day and Alamo Square -- which overlooks the famous "Painted Ladies" -- were surprisingly barren.


Coronavirus kills one person every 17 minutes in New York

FOX News

New York City hopes to convert several buildings into temporary hospitals to handle an expected surge in coronavirus patients; Fox News correspondent Bryan Llenas reports. Get all the latest news on coronavirus and more delivered daily to your inbox. For the past two days, New Yorkers have been dying at a rate of one every 17 minutes, according to the latest grim citywide statistics. On both Thursday and Friday, another 84 people died in the city from the coronavirus, as the number of positive cases and of those who are critically ill also climbed. A person walks across 42nd Street on March 22, 2020 in New York City.


New York mayor Bill de Blasio warns half of all New Yorkers will get coronavirus

FOX News

Certified board surgeron Dr. Azadeh Shirazi joins Trace Gallagher to discuss the future of the COVID-19 outbreak. Get all the latest news on coronavirus and more delivered daily to your inbox. Over 4 million New Yorkers -- or 50 percent of the city's population -- will get the coronavirus, Mayor de Blasio warned Wednesday. "It's a fair bet to say that half of all New Yorkers and maybe more than half will end up contracting this disease," de Blasio said at a City Hall press briefing about the outbreak as the Big Apple's positive cases approached 18,000 with nearly 200 deaths. "That's worrisome, very deeply worrisome," he added.


Coronavirus: New tech being used to fight pandemic

FOX News

Real estate investor Tom Barrack on how the outbreak is impacting the housing market. Get all the latest news on coronavirus and more delivered daily to your inbox. As nations around the world scramble to fight the COVID-19 pandemic, straining medical resources and overburdening doctors, governments are turning to technology to help fight back the outbreak. Multiple Asian governments have used smartphone apps to track data of users who have tested positive for COVID-19. In South Korea, a compulsory app enforces self-isolation for those ordered to maintain it.


New Army technology can track and destroy maneuvering cruise missiles

FOX News

This undated photo distributed on Friday, June 9, 2017, by the North Korean government, shows a test of a new type of cruise missile launch at an undisclosed location in North Korea - file photo. Maneuvering cruise missiles, fast-moving stealthy fighter jets, armed drones, long-range helicopter-fired air-to-ground weapons and hypersonic rounds traveling at five times the speed of sound are all modern methods of air-attack able to destroy Army ground war units -- potentially even rendering them inoperable or, even worse, making them vulnerable to complete destruction. The weapons, sensors and platforms now operated by potential adversaries have created an entirely new tactical environment now defining land combat, a scenario that has inspired the U.S. Army to fast-track new, advanced air and missile defense radar technologies sufficient to thwart this changing sphere of enemy attack possibilities. The service is now surging forward in response to an urgent need with a new 360-degree radar system called Lower Tier Air & Missile Defense Sensor (LTAMDS), slated for initial fielding by 2022. Unlike the more linear directional configuration of the existing Patriot air and missile defense system, the Raytheon-built LTAMDS is engineered with overlapping 120-degree arrays intended to seamlessly track approaching threats using a 360-degree protection envelope.


CDC launches coronavirus bot to help take strain off healthcare system

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced a new bot over the weekend that it says can analyze COVID-19 symptoms and recommend a course of action in an attempt to aid an overwhelmed healthcare system. The bot, known as Clara, utilizes Microsoft's Azure Healthcare Bot framework, which the government agency hopes will help allay the fears of people who believe they may have the virus. "Microsoft's Healthcare Bot service is one solution that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to help the CDC and other frontline organizations respond to these inquiries, freeing up doctors, nurses, administrators and other healthcare professionals to provide critical care to those who need it," Microsoft wrote in a statement in conjunction with the CDC announcement.


Southern California police to patrol with drones during coronavirus lockdown: report

FOX News

Health experts analyze the Spanish Flu, Asian Flu, Hong Kong Flu and swine flus of 1976 and 2009 in a special hosted by Harris Faulkner. Some police departments in California plan on using drones to enforce a coronavirus lockdown and to, in part, monitor the homeless population, according to a report on Friday. The Chula Vista Police Department, located just south of San Diego near the California-Mexico border, recently purchased two $11,000 drones -- doubling its fleet -- that will be outfitted with speakers and night vision cameras. "We have not traditionally mounted speakers to our drones, but ... if we need to cover a large area to get an announcement out, or if there were a crowd somewhere that we needed to disperse -- we could do it without getting police officers involved," said Capt. The Chula Vista Police Department plans on using drones to enforce a coronavirus lockdown.


Navy sends coronavirus test kits to warships in the Pacific

FOX News

Dr Linda Dahl joins Trace Gallagher to give insight about new drugs being tested to combat coronavirus; Doctors telling patients to stay home and rely on telemedicine. The U.S. Navy said Saturday it has sent coronavirus test kits to forward-deployed warships in the Western Pacific. It's the first time the Navy has announced it has moved COVID-19 test kits to ships at sea. The Navy's 7th Fleet said in a statement the kits have been sent to the aircraft carrier Theodore Roosevelt and the amphibious assault ship USS America underway in the South China Sea. So far there have been no positive cases on any warships underway in the Pacific, the Navy said.


Liberty Vittert: How much of our liberty and privacy must we sacrifice in war on coronavirus?

FOX News

White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow joins Sean Hannity on'Hannity.' I'm starting to get really scared ... and not of the coronavirus. I'm scared about the loss of liberty people around the world are experiencing as normal life grinds to a halt and we hunker down and keep our distance from each other to stop the spread of this microscopic terror. Three weeks ago you would think I was crazy if I told you that U.S. borders would be closed; many stores, restaurants, bars, and factories would be shut down; office workers would be teleworking from home; millions of children would be out of school; and many of us would be told to stay in our homes as much as possible and only leave when absolutely necessary. If an imaginative scriptwriter pitched a movie with this plot just a few weeks ago he might have been told by a movie studio that the idea was too wild and unbelievable even for a fantasy film.