Associated Press



Escaped inmate may have used wire cutters delivered by drone

Associated Press

Jimmy Causey is seen in this undated photo from authorities in Williamson County, Texas. Authorities said Friday, July 7, 2017, that Causey was on the run more than two days after using wire cutters that were probably dropped from a drone as part of an elaborate escape plan that also included cellphones smuggled into prison, guns and at least $47,000 in cash. Authorities said Friday, July 7, 2017, that Causey was on the run more than two days after using wire cutters that were probably dropped from a drone as part of an elaborate escape plan that also included cellphones smuggled into prison, guns and at least $47,000 in cash. This undated photo provided by the South Carolina Department of Corrections shows Jimmy Causey, who authorities continue to search for Thursday, July 6, 2017, after he escaped from Lieber Correctional Institution maximum-security prison in Ridgeville, S.C. (South Carolina Department of Corrections via AP) COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) -- A South Carolina inmate broke out of a maximum-security prison using wire cutters apparently flown in by drone, officials said Friday, describing a new and devilishly hard-to-stop means of escape.


Escaped inmate may have used wire cutters delivered by drone

Associated Press

Jimmy Causey is seen in this undated photo from authorities in Williamson County, Texas. Authorities said Friday, July 7, 2017, that Causey was on the run more than two days after using wire cutters that were probably dropped from a drone as part of an elaborate escape plan that also included cellphones smuggled into prison, guns and at least $47,000 in cash. Authorities said Friday, July 7, 2017, that Causey was on the run more than two days after using wire cutters that were probably dropped from a drone as part of an elaborate escape plan that also included cellphones smuggled into prison, guns and at least $47,000 in cash. This undated photo provided by the South Carolina Department of Corrections shows Jimmy Causey, who authorities continue to search for Thursday, July 6, 2017, after he escaped from Lieber Correctional Institution maximum-security prison in Ridgeville, S.C. (South Carolina Department of Corrections via AP) COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) -- A South Carolina inmate broke out of a maximum-security prison using wire cutters that were apparently flown in by drone, officials said Friday, describing a new and devilishly hard-to-stop means of escape.


US military shoots down Iranian-made drone in southern Syria

Associated Press

In this picture released by the Iranian state-run IRIB News Agency on Monday, June 19, 2017, a missile is fired from city of Kermanshah in western Iran targeting the Islamic State group in Syria. Iran's powerful Revolutionary Guard, a paramilitary force in charge of the country's missile program, said it launched six Zolfaghar ballistic missiles from the western provinces of Kermanshah and Kurdistan. In this picture released by the Iranian state-run IRIB News Agency on Monday, June 19, 2017, a missile is fired from city of Kermanshah in western Iran targeting the Islamic State group in Syria. In this picture released by the Iranian state-run IRIB News Agency on Monday, June 19, 2017, a missile is fired from city of Kermanshah in western Iran targeting the Islamic State group in Syria.


Uber CEO to take leave, leadership team to run company

Associated Press

FILE - In this Sunday, Feb. 26, 2017, file photo, Uber CEO Travis Kalanick arrives at the Vanity Fair Oscar Party in Beverly Hills, Calif. Uber must get rid of leaders who tolerate bad behavior and hire people who don't, including up to the chief executive, experts say, as the ride-hailing company gets ready to announce significant changes to its culture and management. FILE - In this Sunday, Feb. 26, 2017, file photo, Uber CEO Travis Kalanick arrives at the Vanity Fair Oscar Party in Beverly Hills, Calif. Uber must get rid of leaders who tolerate bad behavior and hire people who don't, including up to the chief executive, experts say, as the ride-hailing company gets ready to announce significant changes to its culture and management. The announcement comes as former U.S. Attorney Eric Holder released a list of recommendations to improve Uber's toxic workplace culture, which condoned sexual harassment, bullying and retaliation against those who reported problems. Last week, the company fired 20 people including some managers at the recommendation of Perkins Coie, which probed specific complaints made to the company about sex harassment, bullying, and retaliation for reporting problems.