Yorke-Smith, Neil


Introduction to the Special Issue on "Usable AI"

AI Magazine

When creating algorithms or systems that are supposed to be used by people, we should be able to adopt a "binocular" view of users' interaction with intelligent systems: a view that regards the design of interaction and the design of intelligent algorithms as interrelated parts of a single design problem. This special issue offers a coherent set of articles on two levels of generality that illustrate the binocular view and help readers to adopt it.


Designing for Usability of an Adaptive Time Management Assistant

AI Magazine

This case study article describes the iterative design process of an adaptive, mixed-initiative calendaring tool with embedded artificial intelligence. We establish the specific types of assistance in which the target user population expressed interest, and we highlight our findings regarding the scheduling practices and the reminding preferences of these users. These findings motivated the redesign and enhancement of our intelligent system. Lessons learned from the study--namely, highlighting the merits of usability toward widespread adoption and retention, and that simple problems that perhaps do not necessitate complex AI-based solutions should not go unattended merely due to their inherent simplicity--conclude the article, along with a discussion of the importance of the iterative design process for any user adaptive system.


The 2008 Scheduling and Planning Applications Workshop (SPARK'08)

AI Magazine

SPARK'08 was the first edition of a workshop series designed to provide a stable, long-term forum where researchers could discuss the applications of planning and scheduling techniques to real problems. Animated discussion characterized the workshop, which was collocated with Eighteenth International Conference on Automated Planning and Scheduling (ICAPS-08) held in Sydney, Australia in September 2008.


Preferences in Interactive Systems: Technical Challenges and Case Studies

AI Magazine

Interactive artificial intelligence systems employ preferences in both their reasoning and their interaction with the user. This survey considers preference handling in applications such as recommender systems, personal assistant agents, and personalized user interfaces. We survey the major questions and approaches, present illustrative examples, and give an outlook on potential benefits and challenges.


AAAI 2007 Spring Symposium Series Reports

AI Magazine

The 2007 Spring Symposium Series was held Monday through Wednesday, March 26-28, 2007, at Stanford University, California. The titles of the nine symposia in this symposium series were (1) Control Mechanisms for Spatial Knowledge Processing in Cognitive/Intelligent Systems, (2) Game Theoretic and Decision Theoretic Agents, (3) Intentions in Intelligent Systems, (4) Interaction Challenges for Artificial Assistants, (5) Logical Formalizations of Commonsense Reasoning, (6) Machine Reading, (7) Multidisciplinary Collaboration for Socially Assistive Robotics, (8) Quantum Interaction, and (9) Robots and Robot Venues: Resources for AI Education.