Tejada, Sheila


The AAAI 2005 Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition

AI Magazine

The Fourteenth Annual AAAI Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition was held at the National Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in July 2005. This year marked a change in the venue format from a conference hall to a hotel, which changed how the robot event was run. As a result, the robots were much more visible to the attendees of the AAAI conference than in previous years. This article describes the events that were held at the conference, including the Scavenger Hunt, Open Interaction, Robot Challenge, and Robot Exhibition.


The Workshops at the Twentieth National Conference on Artificial Intelligence

AI Magazine

The AAAI-05 workshops were held on Saturday and Sunday, July 9-10, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The thirteen workshops were Contexts and Ontologies: Theory, Practice and Applications, Educational Data Mining, Exploring Planning and Scheduling for Web Services, Grid and Autonomic Computing, Human Comprehensible Machine Learning, Inference for Textual Question Answering, Integrating Planning into Scheduling, Learning in Computer Vision, Link Analysis, Mobile Robot Workshop, Modular Construction of Humanlike Intelligence, Multiagent Learning, Question Answering in Restricted Domains, and Spoken Language Understanding.


The 2004 Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition

AI Magazine

The thirteenth AAAI Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition was once again collocated with AAAI-2204, in San Jose, California. As in previous years, the robot events drew competitors from both academia and industry to showcase state-ofthe- art mobile robot software and systems in four organized events.


The 2004 AAAI Spring Symposium Series

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University's Department of Computer Science, presented the 2004 Spring Symposium Series, Monday through Wednesday, March 22-24, at Stanford University. The titles of the eight symposia were (1) Accessible Hands-on Artificial Intelligence and Robotics Education; (2) Architectures for Modeling Emotion: Cross-Disciplinary Foundations; (3) Bridging the Multiagent and Multirobotic Research Gap; (4) Exploring Attitude and Affect in Text: Theories and Applications; (5) Interaction between Humans and Autonomous Systems over Extended Operation; (6) Knowledge Representation and Ontologies for Autonomous Systems; (7) Language Learning: An Interdisciplinary Perspective; and (8) Semantic Web Services. Most symposia chairs elected to create AAAI technical reports of their symposium, which are available as paperbound reports or (for AAAI members) are downloadable on the AAAI members-only Web site. This report includes summaries of the eight symposia, written by the symposia chairs.


Toward Integrated Soccer Robots

AI Magazine

Robot soccer competition provides an excellent opportunity for integrated robotics research. All these tasks demand robots that are autonomous (sensing, thinking, and acting as independent creatures), efficient (functioning under time and resource constraints), cooperative (collaborating with each other to accomplish tasks that are beyond an individual's capabilities), and intelligent (reasoning and planning actions and perhaps learning from experience). Furthermore, all these capabilities must be integrated into a single and complete system, which raises a set of challenges that are new to individual research disciplines. At RoboCup-97, held as part of the Fifteenth International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence, these integrated robots performed well, and our DREAMTEAM won the world championship in the middle-size robot league.


Yoda: The Young Observant Discovery Agent

AI Magazine

The YODA Robot Project at the University of Southern California/Information Sciences Institute consists of a group of young researchers who share a passion for autonomous systems that can bootstrap its knowledge from real environments by exploration, experimentation, learning, and discovery. Our participation in the Fifth Annual AAAI Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition, held as part of the Thirteenth National Conference on Artificial Intelligence, served as the first milestone in advancing us toward this goal. YODA's software architecture is a hierarchy of abstraction layers, ranging from a set of behaviors at the bottom layer to a dynamic, mission-oriented planner at the top. This abstraction architecture has proven robust in dynamic and noisy environments, as shown by YODA's performance at the robot competition.