Tejada, Sheila


Exploring Artificial Intelligence Through Image Recognition

AAAI Conferences

This demonstration showcases the different use cases of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in education by introducing students to applications of the Scribbler robot with the Fluke board in order to cultivate an interest in programming, robotics, and AI. The targeted audience for this is students aged eight through twelve. This demonstration uses three Scribbler robots to introduce students to common tools in AI (OpenCV and Tesseract), and teach them the basics of coding in an interactive, unintimidating way; by physically describing the goals of simple shape-building algorithms and implementing them using cards with both visual and written representations of the instructions.


Application for AI-OCR Module: Auto Detection of Emails/Letter Images

AAAI Conferences

The purpose of this project is to provide instructions for teaching the Artificial Intelligence topic of supervised machine learning for the task of Optical Character Recognition (OCR) at various levels of a student’s undergraduate curriculum, such as basic knowledge, novice, and intermediate. The levels vary from beginner with a slight background in computing and computer science to intermediate with a better understanding of computer science fundamentals and algorithms.


The AAAI 2005 Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition

AI Magazine

The Fourteenth Annual AAAI Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition was held at the National Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in July 2005. This year marked a change in the venue format from a conference hall to a hotel, which changed how the robot event was run. As a result, the robots were much more visible to the attendees of the AAAI conference than in previous years. This article describes the events that were held at the conference, including the Scavenger Hunt, Open Interaction, Robot Challenge, and Robot Exhibition.


The AAAI 2005 Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition

AI Magazine

The Fourteenth Annual AAAI Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition was held at the National Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in July 2005. This year marked a change in the venue format from a conference hall to a hotel, which changed how the robot event was run. As a result, the robots were much more visible to the attendees of the AAAI conference than in previous years. This allowed teams that focused on human-robot interaction to have many more opportunities to interact with people. This article describes the events that were held at the conference, including the Scavenger Hunt, Open Interaction, Robot Challenge, and Robot Exhibition.


Components, Curriculum, and Community: Robots and Robotics in Undergraduate AI Education

AI Magazine

This editorial introduction presents an overview of the robotic resources available to AI educators and provides context for the articles in this special issue. We set the stage by addressing the trade-offs among a number of established and emerging hardware and software platforms, curricular topics, and robot contests used to motivate and teach undergraduate AI.


The Workshops at the Twentieth National Conference on Artificial Intelligence

AI Magazine

The AAAI-05 workshops were held on Saturday and Sunday, July 9-10, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The thirteen workshops were Contexts and Ontologies: Theory, Practice and Applications, Educational Data Mining, Exploring Planning and Scheduling for Web Services, Grid and Autonomic Computing, Human Comprehensible Machine Learning, Inference for Textual Question Answering, Integrating Planning into Scheduling, Learning in Computer Vision, Link Analysis, Mobile Robot Workshop, Modular Construction of Humanlike Intelligence, Multiagent Learning, Question Answering in Restricted Domains, and Spoken Language Understanding.


The Workshops at the Twentieth National Conference on Artificial Intelligence

AI Magazine

The AAAI-05 workshops were held on Saturday and Sunday, July 9-10, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The thirteen workshops were Contexts and Ontologies: Theory, Practice and Applications, Educational Data Mining, Exploring Planning and Scheduling for Web Services, Grid and Autonomic Computing, Human Comprehensible Machine Learning, Inference for Textual Question Answering, Integrating Planning into Scheduling, Learning in Computer Vision, Link Analysis, Mobile Robot Workshop, Modular Construction of Humanlike Intelligence, Multiagent Learning, Question Answering in Restricted Domains, and Spoken Language Understanding.


The 2004 Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition

AI Magazine

The thirteenth AAAI Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition was once again collocated with AAAI-2204, in San Jose, California. As in previous years, the robot events drew competitors from both academia and industry to showcase state-ofthe- art mobile robot software and systems in four organized events.


The 2004 Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition

AI Magazine

The thirteenth AAAI Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition was once again collocated with AAAI-2204, in San Jose, California. As in previous years, the robot events drew competitors from both academia and industry to showcase state-ofthe- art mobile robot software and systems in four organized events.


The 2004 AAAI Spring Symposium Series

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University's Department of Computer Science, presented the 2004 Spring Symposium Series, Monday through Wednesday, March 22-24, at Stanford University. The titles of the eight symposia were (1) Accessible Hands-on Artificial Intelligence and Robotics Education; (2) Architectures for Modeling Emotion: Cross-Disciplinary Foundations; (3) Bridging the Multiagent and Multirobotic Research Gap; (4) Exploring Attitude and Affect in Text: Theories and Applications; (5) Interaction between Humans and Autonomous Systems over Extended Operation; (6) Knowledge Representation and Ontologies for Autonomous Systems; (7) Language Learning: An Interdisciplinary Perspective; and (8) Semantic Web Services. Most symposia chairs elected to create AAAI technical reports of their symposium, which are available as paperbound reports or (for AAAI members) are downloadable on the AAAI members-only Web site. This report includes summaries of the eight symposia, written by the symposia chairs.