Stojanov, Georgi


Reports of the AAAI 2016 Spring Symposium Series

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University's Department of Computer Science, presented the 2016 Spring Symposium Series on Monday through Wednesday, March 21-23, 2016 at Stanford University. The titles of the seven symposia were (1) AI and the Mitigation of Human Error: Anomalies, Team Metrics and Thermodynamics; (2) Challenges and Opportunities in Multiagent Learning for the Real World (3) Enabling Computing Research in Socially Intelligent Human-Robot Interaction: A Community-Driven Modular Research Platform; (4) Ethical and Moral Considerations in Non-Human Agents; (5) Intelligent Systems for Supporting Distributed Human Teamwork; (6) Observational Studies through Social Media and Other Human-Generated Content, and (7) Well-Being Computing: AI Meets Health and Happiness Science.


Grounding Drones’ Ethical Use Reasoning

AAAI Conferences

In this paper we look into some of the arguments put forward in favor of building lethal autonomous weapons systems (LAWS), which would be superior to human ethical judgment, by design. Starting with the circumstances where most of the LAWS programs originated, we question the very premises of the current discourse and in particular Arkin’s work (e.g. what is the evidence for the eventual moral superiority of machines? does it help that the discussion of ethics is framed in a context of classical interstate war conflict?) of the approach. We sketch an alternative view, which would reframe the whole roboethics discourse in terms of conflict resolution and prevention as well as policy making.


Reports on the 2014 AAAI Fall Symposium Series

AI Magazine

The AAAI 2014 Fall Symposium Series was held Thursday through Saturday, November 13–15, at the Westin Arlington Gateway in Arlington, Virginia adjacent to Washington, DC. The titles of the seven symposia were Artificial Intelligence for Human-Robot Interaction, Energy Market Prediction, Expanding the Boundaries of Health Informatics Using AI, Knowledge, Skill, and Behavior Transfer in Autonomous Robots, Modeling Changing Perspectives: Reconceptualizing Sensorimotor Experiences, Natural Language Access to Big Data, and The Nature of Humans and Machines: A Multidisciplinary Discourse. The highlights of each symposium are presented in this report.


Reports on the 2014 AAAI Fall Symposium Series

AI Magazine

The AAAI 2014 Fall Symposium Series was held Thursday through Saturday, November 13–15, at the Westin Arlington Gateway in Arlington, Virginia adjacent to Washington, DC. The titles of the seven symposia were Artificial Intelligence for Human-Robot Interaction, Energy Market Prediction, Expanding the Boundaries of Health Informatics Using AI, Knowledge, Skill, and Behavior Transfer in Autonomous Robots, Modeling Changing Perspectives: Reconceptualizing Sensorimotor Experiences, Natural Language Access to Big Data, and The Nature of Humans and Machines: A Multidisciplinary Discourse. The highlights of each symposium are presented in this report.


Reports of the 2013 AAAI Spring Symposium Series

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence was pleased to present the AAAI 2013 Spring Symposium Series, held Monday through Wednesday, March 25-27, 2013. The titles of the eight symposia were Analyzing Microtext, Creativity and (Early) Cognitive Development, Data Driven Wellness: From Self-Tracking to Behavior Change, Designing Intelligent Robots: Reintegrating AI II, Lifelong Machine Learning, Shikakeology: Designing Triggers for Behavior Change, Trust and Autonomous Systems, and Weakly Supervised Learning from Multimedia. This report contains summaries of the symposia, written, in most cases, by the cochairs of the symposium.


Reports of the 2013 AAAI Spring Symposium Series

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence was pleased to present the AAAI 2013 Spring Symposium Series, held Monday through Wednesday, March 25-27, 2013. The titles of the eight symposia were Analyzing Microtext, Creativity and (Early) Cognitive Development, Data Driven Wellness: From Self-Tracking to Behavior Change, Designing Intelligent Robots: Reintegrating AI II, Lifelong Machine Learning, Shikakeology: Designing Triggers for Behavior Change, Trust and Autonomous Systems, and Weakly Supervised Learning from Multimedia. This report contains summaries of the symposia, written, in most cases, by the cochairs of the symposium.


Preface

AAAI Conferences

Cross-domain general creativity is probably uniquely human faculty. From a child who constructs a new toy using the old and broken ones, to the scientist who works out a theory and makes a profound impact on human civilization, the process invariably evokes the feelings of surprise, astonishment, and wonder. Though we understand what creativity is at an intuitive level, it has turned out to be quite difficult to define and formally and explore it scientifically.


Effects of Task Switching on Creativity Tests

AAAI Conferences

We analyze the results of an experiment where participants were asked to complete a set of creativity tests under various interruption conditions. The results indicate that interruptions hinder creativity. However, the extent by which creativity is thwarted depends both on the creative activity considered and the quality of the task interrupting it. These results suggest that a better understanding of how different types of interruptions interact with specific creative activities may help preventing some of the undesired effects. Unexpectedly, we found no evidence that interruptions may improve creativity but we believe that this effect may be possible under conditions that were not reflected by our experiment.