Simon, H. A.



Optimal problem-solving search: All-or-none solutions

Classics

"Optimal algorithms are derived for satisficing problem-solving search, that is, search where the goal is to reach any solution, no distinction being made among different solutions. This task is quite different from search for best solutions or shortest path solutions.Constraints may be placed on the order in which sites may be searched. This paper treats satisficing searches through partially ordered search spaces where there are multiple alternative goals."Artificial Intelligence 6:235-247


Problem solving and rule induction: A unified view

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In L. W. Gregg (Ed.), Knowledge and cognition. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum


Problem solving and rule induction: A unified view

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In L. W. Gregg (Ed.), Knowledge and cognition. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum


Human problem solving

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The aim of the book is to advance the understanding of how humans think. It seeks to do so by putting forth a theory of human problem solving, along with a body of empirical evidence that permits assessment of the theory.Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall


The Sciences of the Artificial

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Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press


Cognitive processes in solving algebra word problems

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In B. Kleinmuntz (Ed.), Problem solving. New York: Wiley, 51-119.


On Reasoning about actions

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Carnegie Institute of Technology: Complex Information Processing Paper 87


Experiments with a heuristic compiler

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"This report describes some experiments in constructing a compiler that makes use of heuristic problem~solving techniques such as those incorporated in the General Problem Solver (GPS) [1]. The experiments were aimed at the dual objectives of throwing light on some of the problems of constructing more powerful programming languages and compilers, and of testing whether the task of writing a computer program can be regarded as a "problem" in the sense in which that term is used in GPS. The present paper is concerned primarily with the second objective--with analyzing some of the problem-solving processes that are involved in writing computer programs. At the present stage of their development, no claims will be made for the heuristic programming procedures described here as practical approaches to the construction of compilers. Their interest lies in what they teach us about the nature of the programming task."See also: Artificial intelligence and self-organizing systems: Experiments with a Heuristic CompilerJACM, 10, 493-€“506


GPS, a program that simulates human thought

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This article is concerned with the psychology of human thinking. It setsforth a theory to explain how some humans try to solve some simpleformal problems. The research from which the theory emerged is intimatelyrelated to the field of information processing and the construction of intelligentautomata, and the theory is expressed in the form of a computerprogram. The rapid technical advances in the art of programming digitalcomputers to do sophisticated tasks have made such a theory feasible.It is often argued that a careful line must be drawn between the attemptto accomplish with machines the same tasks that humans perform, andthe attempt to simulate the processes humans actually use to accomplishthese tasks. The program discussed in the report, GPS (General ProblemSolver), maximally confuses the two approaches—with-mutual"!benefit. Lerende Automaten, Munich: Oldenberg KG