Simmons, Reid


Believable Robot Characters

AI Magazine

Believability of characters has been an objective in literature, theater, film, and animation. We argue that believable robot characters are important in human-robot interaction, as well. In particular, we contend that believable characters evoke users' social responses that, for some tasks, lead to more natural interactions and are associated with improved task performance. In a dialogue-capable robot, a key to such believability is the integration of a consistent storyline, verbal and nonverbal behaviors, and sociocultural context.


GRACE: An Autonomous Robot for the AAAI Robot Challenge

AI Magazine

In an attempt to solve as much of the AAAI Robot Challenge as possible, five research institutions representing academia, industry, and government integrated their research into a single robot named GRACE. This article describes this first-year effort by the GRACE team, including not only the various techniques each participant brought to GRACE but also the difficult integration effort itself.


RIACS Workshop on the Verification and Validation of Autonomous and Adaptive Systems

AI Magazine

The long-term future of space exploration at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is dependent on the full exploitation of autonomous and adaptive systems, but mission managers are worried about the reliability of these more intelligent systems. The main focus of the workshop was to address these worries; hence, we invited NASA engineers working on autonomous and adaptive systems and researchers interested in the verification and validation of software systems. The dual purpose of the meeting was to (1) make NASA engineers aware of the verification and validation techniques they could be using and (2) make the verification and validation community aware of the complexity of the systems NASA is developing. The workshop was held 5 to 7 December 2000 at the Asilomar Conference Center in Pacific Grove, California.


The Find-Life-on-Mars Event

AI Magazine

The Find-Life-on-Mars event of the 1997 Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibition featured robots trying to find and collect stationary and moving colored objects in an arena littered with real rocks. The 2- day event had 11 entries participating in both single- robot and multirobot categories, both with and without manipulators. During the event, many of the robots successfully demonstrated object recognition, obstacle avoidance, exploration, and the collection and depositing of objects.


The 1994 AAAI Robot Competition and Exhibition

AI Magazine

The third annual AAAI Robot Competition and Exhibition was held in 1994 during the Twelfth National Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Seattle, Washington. The competition featured Office Delivery and Office Cleanup events, which demanded competence in navigation, object recognition, and manipulation. The competition was organized into four parts: (1) a preliminary set of trials, (2) the competition finals, (3) a public robot exhibition, and (4) a forum to discuss technical issues in AI and robotics. It also presents the results of the competition and related events and provides suggestions for the direction of future exhibitions.


The Winning Robots from the 1993 Robot Competition

AI Magazine

The second annual Robot Competition and Exhibition sponsored by the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence was held in Washington D.C. on 13-15 July 1993 in conjunction with the Eleventh National Conference on Artificial Intelligence. This article describes the robots that placed first and second in each event and compares their strategies and their resulting successes and difficulties.