Nilsson, Nils J.


Reconsiderations

AI Magazine

In 1983, I gave the AAAI president's address titled "Artificial Intelligence Prepares for 2001." An article, based on that talk, was published soon after in "AI Magazine. In this article, I retract or modify some of the points made in that piece and reaffirm others. Specifically, I now acknowledge the many important facets of AI research beyond high-level reasoning but maintain my view about the importance of integrated AI systems, such as mobile robots.


Human-Level Artificial Intelligence? Be Serious!

AI Magazine

I claim that achieving real human-level artificial intelligence would necessarily imply that most of the tasks that humans perform for pay could be automated. Rather than work toward this goal of automation by building special-purpose systems, I argue for the development of general-purpose, educable systems that can learn and be taught to perform any of the thousands of jobs that humans can perform. Joining others who have made similar proposals, I advocate beginning with a system that has minimal, although extensive, built-in capabilities. These would have to include the ability to improve through learning along with many other abilities.


Eye on the Prize

AI Magazine

In its early stages, the field of AI had as its main goal the invention of computer programs having the general problem-solving abilities of humans. Along the way, a major shift of emphasis developed from general-purpose programs toward performance programs, ones whose competence was highly specialized and limited to particular areas of expertise. In this article, I claim that AI is now at the beginning of another transition, one that will reinvigorate efforts to build programs of general, humanlike competence. These programs will use specialized performance programs as tools, much like humans do.




Letters to the Editor

AI Magazine

Jim Kornell, Robert Park, Christopher Dungan, Joop Schopman, David Drager, Nils J. Nilsson, Marty Kalin, John Gavin, Bernard Meltzer, Robert Salmansohn, Keith McCammon, Loren Martindale Abstract Subjects include AI's impact on employment, the AAAI conference, a response to McCarthy's Presidential Message, AI going public, and computerless expert systems. Subjects include AI's impact on employment, the AAAI conference, a response to McCarthy's Presidential Message, AI going public, and computerless expert systems.


Artificial Intelligence, Employment, and Income

AI Magazine

Artificial intelligence (AI) will have profound societal effects. It promises potential benefits (and may also pose risks) in education, defense, business, law and science. In this article we explore how AI is likely to affect employment and the distribution of income. We argue that AI will indeed reduce drastically the need of human toil.


Introduction to the COMTEX Microfiche Edition of the SRI Artificial Intelligence Center: Technical Notes

AI Magazine

Between these dates, Charlie organized an Applied Physics Laboratory and became interested in "learning machines" and "self-organizing systems." That interest launched a group that ultimately grew into a major world center of artificial intelligence research - a center that has endured twenty-five years of boom and bust in fashion, has "graduated" over a hundred AI research professionals, and has generated ideas and programs resulting in new products and companies as well as scientific articles, books, and this particular collection itself.


Artificial Intelligence Prepares for 2001

AI Magazine

Artificial Intelligence, as a maturing scientific/engineering discipline, is beginning to find its niche among the variety of subjects that are relevant to intelligent, perceptive behavior. A view of AI is presented that is based on a declarative representation of knowledge with semantic attachments to problem-specific procedures and data structures. Several important challenges to this view are briefly discussed. It is argued that research in the field would be stimulated by a project to develop a computer individual that would have a continuing existence in time.