Morgenstern, Leora



Planning, Executing, and Evaluating the Winograd Schema Challenge

AI Magazine

The Winograd Schema Challenge was proposed by Hector Levesque in 2011 as an alternative to the Turing Test. Chief among its features is a simple question format that can span many commonsense knowledge domains. Questions are chosen so that they do not require specialized knoweldge or training, and are easy for humans to answer. This article details our plans to run the WSC and evaluate results.


Planning, Executing, and Evaluating the Winograd Schema Challenge

AI Magazine

The Winograd Schema Challenge was proposed by Hector Levesque in 2011 as an alternative to the Turing Test. Chief among its features is a simple question format that can span many commonsense knowledge domains. Questions are chosen so that they do not require specialized knoweldge or training, and are easy for humans to answer. This article details our plans to run the WSC and evaluate results.


Representing and Reasoning about Time Travel Narratives: Foundational Concepts

AAAI Conferences

The paper develops a branching-time ontology that maintains the classical restriction of forward movement through a temporal tree structure, but permits the representation of paths in which one can perform inferences about time-travel scenarios. Central to the ontology is the notion of an agent embodiment whose beliefs are equivalent to those of an agent who has time-traveled from the future.



The Winograd Schema Challenge

AAAI Conferences

In this paper, we present an alternative to the Turing Test that has some conceptual and practical advantages. A Winograd schema is a pair of sentences that differ only in one or two words and that contain a referential ambiguity that is resolved in opposite directions in the two sentences. We have compiled a collection of Winograd schemas, designed so that the correct answer is obvious to the human reader, but cannot easily be found using selectional restrictions or statistical techniques over text corpora. A contestant in the Winograd Schema Challenge is presented with a collection of one sentence from each pair, and required to achieve human-level accuracy in choosing the correct disambiguation.


On John McCarthy's 80th Birthday, in Honor of His Contributions

AI Magazine

John McCarthy's contributions to computer science and artificial intelligence are legendary. He invented Lisp, made substantial contributions to early work in timesharing and the theory of computation, and was one of the founders of artificial intelligence and knowledge representation. This article, written in honor of McCarthy's 80th birthday, presents a brief biography, an overview of the major themes of his research, and a discussion of several of his major papers.


On John McCarthy's 80th Birthday, in Honor of His Contributions

AI Magazine

John McCarthy's contributions to computer science and artificial intelligence are legendary. He invented Lisp, made substantial contributions to early work in timesharing and the theory of computation, and was one of the founders of artificial intelligence and knowledge representation. This article, written in honor of McCarthy's 80th birthday, presents a brief biography, an overview of the major themes of his research, and a discussion of several of his major papers.


AAAI 2007 Spring Symposium Series Reports

AI Magazine

The 2007 Spring Symposium Series was held Monday through Wednesday, March 26-28, 2007, at Stanford University, California. The titles of the nine symposia in this symposium series were (1) Control Mechanisms for Spatial Knowledge Processing in Cognitive/Intelligent Systems, (2) Game Theoretic and Decision Theoretic Agents, (3) Intentions in Intelligent Systems, (4) Interaction Challenges for Artificial Assistants, (5) Logical Formalizations of Commonsense Reasoning, (6) Machine Reading, (7) Multidisciplinary Collaboration for Socially Assistive Robotics, (8) Quantum Interaction, and (9) Robots and Robot Venues: Resources for AI Education.


AAAI 2007 Spring Symposium Series Reports

AI Magazine

The 2007 Spring Symposium Series was held Monday through Wednesday, March 26-28, 2007, at Stanford University, California. The titles of the nine symposia in this symposium series were (1) Control Mechanisms for Spatial Knowledge Processing in Cognitive/Intelligent Systems, (2) Game Theoretic and Decision Theoretic Agents, (3) Intentions in Intelligent Systems, (4) Interaction Challenges for Artificial Assistants, (5) Logical Formalizations of Commonsense Reasoning, (6) Machine Reading, (7) Multidisciplinary Collaboration for Socially Assistive Robotics, (8) Quantum Interaction, and (9) Robots and Robot Venues: Resources for AI Education.