Genesereth, Michael


Smart Forms

AAAI Conferences

We present Smart Forms, an innovative web forms technology for easy creation, maintenance, and evaluation of user-friendly web forms especially the ones that must implement complex laws, regulations, or business policies. In order to provide cognitive assistance to end users during form-filling, Smart Forms have built-in mechanisms for visual feedback, restriction of selectable values, and automatic form filling. Smart Forms can be created and maintained easily by declaratively configuring rather than procedurally programming these mechanisms. We also present the Smart Forms Editor which assists a Smart Form creator in creating data-driven form UI, editing, testing and verifying form rules, and testing and debugging a form.


Dexter: Plugging-n-Playing with Data Sources in your Browser

AAAI Conferences

We present Dexter , a browser-based, general purpose data exploration system for end-users. Dexter enables end-users to easily query across multiple Web-accessible heterogeneous (semi-) structured data sources with higher expressivity than that is usually directly supported by the sources. A novelty of our approach lies in the client-sided evaluation of end-user queries. Our query evaluation technique exploits the querying capabilities of the sources and communicates directly with the sources whenever possible. Dexter-Server, the server-sided component of Dexter, merely acts as a proxy for accessing sources that are not directly accessible from a Dexter-Client. Dexter also supports organizational internal and personal data sources while respecting end-users' security and privacy. We present the results of our evaluation of Dexter or scenarios that involve querying across data about the U.S. Congerss, the U.S. Code, and feeds from popular social networks. We discuss the applicability of Dexter for data about cities.


The International General Game Playing Competition

AI Magazine

Games have played a prominent role as a test-bed for advancements in the field of Artificial Intelligence ever since its foundation over half a century ago, resulting in highly specialized world-class game-playing systems being developed for various games. The establishment of the International General Game Playing Competition in 2005, however, resulted in a renewed interest in more general problem solving approaches to game playing. In general game playing (GGP) the goal is to create game-playing systems that autonomously learn how to skillfully play a wide variety of games, given only the descriptions of the game rules. In this paper we review the history of the competition, discuss progress made so far, and list outstanding research challenges.


The International General Game Playing Competition

AI Magazine

Games have played a prominent role as a test-bed for advancements in the field of Artificial Intelligence ever since its foundation over half a century ago, resulting in highly specialized world-class game-playing systems being developed for various games. The establishment of the International General Game Playing Competition in 2005, however, resulted in a renewed interest in more general problem solving approaches to game playing. In general game playing (GGP) the goal is to create game-playing systems that autonomously learn how to skillfully play a wide variety of games, given only the descriptions of the game rules. In this paper we review the history of the competition, discuss progress made so far, and list outstanding research challenges.


Reports of the AAAI 2010 Spring Symposia

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University's Department of Computer Science, is pleased to present the 2010 Spring Symposium Series, to be held Monday through Wednesday, March 22–24, 2010 at Stanford University. The titles of the seven symposia are Artificial Intelligence for Development; Cognitive Shape Processing; Educational Robotics and Beyond: Design and Evaluation; Embedded Reasoning: Intelligence in Embedded Systems Intelligent Information Privacy Management; It's All in the Timing: Representing and Reasoning about Time in Interactive Behavior; and Linked Data Meets Artificial Intelligence.


Reports of the AAAI 2010 Spring Symposia

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University’s Department of Computer Science, is pleased to present the 2010 Spring Symposium Series, to be held Monday through Wednesday, March 22–24, 2010 at Stanford University. The titles of the seven symposia are Artificial Intelligence for Development; Cognitive Shape Processing; Educational Robotics and Beyond: Design and Evaluation; Embedded Reasoning: Intelligence in Embedded Systems Intelligent Information Privacy Management; It’s All in the Timing: Representing and Reasoning about Time in Interactive Behavior; and Linked Data Meets Artificial Intelligence.


General Game Playing: Overview of the AAAI Competition

AI Magazine

A general game playing system is one that can accept a formal description of a game and play the game effectively without human intervention. Unlike specialized game players, such as Deep Blue, general game players do not rely on algorithms designed in advance for specific games; and, unlike Deep Blue, they are able to play different kinds of games. In order to promote work in this area, the AAAI is sponsoring an open competition at this summer's Twentieth National Conference on Artificial Intelligence. This article is an overview of the technical issues and logistics associated with this summer's competition, as well as the relevance of general game playing to the long range-goals of artificial intelligence.


General Game Playing: Overview of the AAAI Competition

AI Magazine

A general game playing system is one that can accept a formal description of a game and play the game effectively without human intervention. Unlike specialized game players, such as Deep Blue, general game players do not rely on algorithms designed in advance for specific games; and, unlike Deep Blue, they are able to play different kinds of games. In order to promote work in this area, the AAAI is sponsoring an open competition at this summer's Twentieth National Conference on Artificial Intelligence. This article is an overview of the technical issues and logistics associated with this summer's competition, as well as the relevance of general game playing to the long range-goals of artificial intelligence.