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Turing's Test


turing test in AI : can machines think?

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Turing test in artificial intelligence is supposed to answer the complicated question of "Can machines think?" here we discuss the Turing test and the vision of Alan Turing about thinking machine.


Introduction to Artificial Intelligence(AI)

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Artificial Intelligence or simply AI has absolutely been the buzz in the most recent era of technology. Humankind has been experiencing the impact of AI in solving real-world problems where humans can't interfere. Therefore, let's get started to know more. Before diving into the AI, we need to know the term intelligence. Humans have innate intelligence, that governs every activity in the human body.


Turing Test: Why It Still Matters - Liwaiwai

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And as AI programs gets better and better at acting like humans, we will increasingly be faced with the question of whether there's really anything that special about our own intelligence, or if we are just machines of a different kind. Could everything we know and do one day be reproduced by a complicated enough computer program installed in a complicated enough robot? In 1950, computer pioneer and wartime codebreaker Alan Turing made one of the most influential attempts to tackle this issue. In a landmark paper, he suggested that the vagueness could be taken out of the question of human and machine intelligence with a simple test. This "Turing Test" assesses the ability of a computer to mimic a human, as judged by another human who could not see the machine but could ask it written questions.


Can Machines Think? The First Steps - WebSystemer.no

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French AI researcher Yann LeCun once said: "Whether we'll able to use new methods to create human-level intelligence, there's probably…


Can Human Minds Be Reduced to Computer Programs?

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In the recent podcast, "Can We Upload Ourselves to a Computer and Live Forever?", Walter Bradley Center director Robert J. Marks and computer scientist Selmer Bringsjord discuss whether we could achieve immortality by uploading our minds to computers. The year 2029 is the consistent date I've predicted, when an artificial intelligence will pass a valid Turing test -- achieving human levels of intelligence. "I have also set the date 2045 for singularity -- which is when humans will multiply our effective intelligence a billion fold, by merging with the intelligence we have created. Indeed, when Kurzweil (left) became a director of engineering at Google in 2012, he not only mainstreamed the basic idea but he "heralded, for many, a symbolic merger between transhumanist philosophy and the clout of major technological enterprise." (The Guardian, 2017). Beyond the Valley, the project gets more ambitious. In a recent piece at Gizmodo, Toronto-based writer George Dvorsky advocates uploading our minds to supercomputers somewhere in the universe, a proposal he calls Distributed Humanity: "Entire civilizations could live on a single supercomputer, enabling the existence of potentially trillions upon trillions of individuals, each of them a single brain emulation.


Artificial intelligence: The thinking machine – Urgent Comms

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According to the Brookings Institute, AI is generally thought to refer to "machines that respond to stimulation consistent with traditional responses from humans, given the human capacity for contemplation, judgment and intention." More simply put, AI uses algorithms to make decisions using real-time data. But unlike more traditional machines that can only respond in predetermined ways, AI can act on data – it can analyze it and respond to it. The concept has been evolving and the technology has become more sophisticated, but it's still a little nebulous – particularly for folks working in local government. It seems everyone kind of knows what AI is, but no one is exactly sure how they can apply it in their communities.


Artificial intelligence: The thinking machine IAM Network

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Artificial intelligence is a bit of a buzz term these days – but what do people really mean when they say AI? And why should local governments care? First of all, AI is extremely misunderstood. We aren't talking about HAL from "2001: A Space Odyssey," necessarily; we're talking about what Alan Turing speculated about "thinking machines" back in the 1950s. According to the Brookings Institute, AI is generally thought to refer to "machines that respond to stimulation consistent with traditional responses from humans, given the human capacity for contemplation, judgment and intention."


Thinking Machine (@GetSmartMachine)

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This should show you just how bad anti-Islam arguments are. Unlike many internet Islamophobes, Holland is a PhD historian & this is the best argument he has. Which is just speculation & is easily refuted just like that.pic.twitter.com/C8GNaW35eC


Computing Machinery and Intelligence

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This question begs one to define the words "machine" and "think". Instead of defining them -- which is seemingly easy, let's replace the question with one that is very similar. Before that, we introduce the imitation game. The game is played by three. The interrogator is isolated from the other two and can ask each one of them questions, with a goal of identifying who the man and who the woman is.


Google says a machine passing the Turing Test "is potentially within reach" - Science & Technology of the Future

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It's still got a ways to go, though. Some are good, some are merely ok, some are bad. Brain data will probably fix many of the shortcomings. Still, it's far better than ELIZA and other chatbots -- and it probably does some amount of world and user-modelling, just not as well as a human over long conversations. Another thing that might fix it is training on yet more data.