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Turing's Test


Will Human Writing and AI Writing Become Indistinguishable?

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Recently, the Guardian, one of the UK's most popular outlets, released an op ed with a provocative title: "A robot wrote this entire article. Are you scared yet, human?". Overall, the essay held together unexpectedly well, despite some simple language and repetition, giving it an eerie self referential quality– an AI telling us why we shouldn't be afraid of AI. The essay wasn't created by a robot per se, but by a new piece of software called GPT-3, a text generation AI engine created by San Francisco based Open AI. Not only has the new release raised eyebrows (MIT's Technology Review called it "shockingly good") but it has re-surfaced a question that has been explored in popular fiction starting with Mary Shelley's Frankenstein in the nineteenth century all the way up to modern sci fi classics like Blade Runner and more recently, HBO's Westworld, where robots that are indistinguishable from humans escape from their sheltered theme park world that they were created for, causing havoc.


Artificial Intelligence: The future ahead - Metro Rail News

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Before moving ahead on the matter, we must know What artificial intelligence is all about, what does it mean and how it works? The technology has been in the news and uses on a vast level for the last few years. As the technological advancements in all fields are growing up with time, let us assess the use of artificial intelligence in future operations of Metro systems. As I have written above, before moving ahead on the topic, let me tell you something about Artificial intelligence. Artificial intelligence is also known as AI is a branch of computer science concerned with building smart machines capable of performing tasks that typically require human intelligence. With its introduction to the world, the tech industry has used it rigorously to grow their businesses worldwide.


Advantages and Disadvantage of Artificial Intelligence - GeeksforGeeks

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Artificial intelligence refers to the simulation of human intelligence in a machine that is programmed to think like humans. The idea of artificial intelligence initially begins by the computer scientist from 1943 to 1956. A model proposed by Alan Turing which is known as the Turing test. A Turing test is an algorithm that computes the data similar to human nature and behavior for proper response. Since this Turing test proposed by Alan Turing which plays one of the most important roles in the development of artificial intelligence, So Alan Turing is known as the father of artificial intelligence.


How AI Could Become Sentient

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I propose to consider the question, 'Can machines think?' - Alan Turing, Computing Machinery and Intelligence, 1950. No one really knows, but everyone agrees humans do it, so let's start with the human brain as a model. Your brain consists of billions of neurons, arranged in delicate patterns to coordinate thought, emotion, behavior, and movement. Each neuron is connected with other neurons by synapses, and when something new is learned, a new neuron is created. Electrical signals between the neurons allows them to'communicate', or transfer information.


On Artificial Minds

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On Artificial Minds Maria Odete Madeira 18-06-2016 "Sed hoc pacto, si quis tam minutum cerneret, ut in uermiculato pauimento nihil ultra unius tesserae modulum acies eius ualeret ambire…" ("De ordine", Augustine, Liber Primus, I, 2) …and if someone had a discernment so narrow that, in a mosaic pavement, could not encompass with the gaze nothing more than the surface of a single piece… Mēns, mentis, mente: spirit, soul, intellect, character, reason, pensamentum (thought) compose a semantic field with semiotic openings to interpretative superveniences for explicative reasons with postulated legitimacies, compatible with pragmatics of operative objectivity. Mente (Old Portuguese) radiculated in mentem (singular accusative of mēns), from the Proto-Indo-European *méntis with the meaning of pensamentum (thought). Mēns, mentis: mente (Old Portuguese): matrix of dispositional integrated order towards cognitive dynamics. We signalize the term dispositional (to put in order) and the term pensamentum: the result of the action of pensare (to think): "Pensare (Latin) means literally: to weigh, to analyze, to synthesize, to associate, to (dis)associate. In any of these definitions are synthesized cognitive dynamics of production of judgment, from the Latin judicium, term primitively connected to the senses of justice and of just, irrecusably linked to the senses of proportion and of measure, opening the term 1 pensare to semantic webs that connect it to the terms: to choose, to decide and to determine between available possibilities towards dynamics of action, in which it is included the action of pensare."


Beyond the Turing Test - KDnuggets

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By Charles Simon, Nationally recognized entrepreneur and software developer. With artificial intelligence (AI) seemingly touching every aspect of our lives, most experts agree that it's only a matter of time before today's AI evolves into Artificial General Intelligence (AGI), a point at which computers meet or even exceed human intelligence. The question that remains, though, is how will we know when that happens? In 1950, Alan Turing introduced his famous test as a method for determining whether or not a machine was actually thinking. A person, the interrogator (C), can communicate via a computer terminal (these days, we might say by instant-messaging, emailing, or texting).


Beyond the Turing Test: How One of the Most Important AI Papers of Recent Years Proposes a New…

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I recently started a new newsletter focus on AI education. TheSequence is a no-BS( meaning no hype, no news etc) AI-focused newsletter that takes 5 minutes to read. The goal is to keep you up to date with machine learning projects, research papers and concepts. Every once in a while, you encounter a research paper that is so simple and yet profound and brilliant that makes you wish you would have written it yourself. That's how I felt when I read François Chollet's On the Measure of Intelligence.


GPT-3, explained: This new language AI is uncanny, funny -- and a big deal

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Last month, OpenAI, the Elon Musk-founded artificial intelligence research lab, announced the arrival of the newest version of an AI system it had been working on that can mimic human language, a model called GPT-3. In the weeks that followed, people got the chance to play with the program. If you follow news about AI, you may have seen some headlines calling it a huge step forward, even a scary one. I've now spent the past few days looking at GPT-3 in greater depth and playing around with it. I'm here to tell you: The hype is real. It has its shortcomings, but make no mistake: GPT-3 represents a tremendous leap for AI. A year ago I sat down to play with GPT-3's precursor dubbed (you guessed it) GPT-2.


Is Fine Art the Next Frontier of AI?

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In 1950, Alan Turing developed the Turing Test as a test of a machine's ability to display human-like intelligent behavior. "Are there imaginable digital computers which would do well in the imitation game?" In most applications of AI, a model is created to imitate the judgment of humans and implement it at scale, be it autonomous vehicles, text summarization, image recognition, or product recommendation. By the nature of imitation, a computer is only able to replicate what humans have done, based on previous data. This doesn't leave room for genuine creativity, which relies on innovation, not imitation.


What do we mean by intelligence?

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Providing a formal definition of Intelligence can be a quite intimidating task. In fact, no common agreement about this topic has been reached so far. Since the beginning of the human history, different definitions of intelligence have been proposed and these varied depending on the historical time and culture. For example, in a society in which language and communication skills play an important role, an individual donated of these kinds of skills might be recognised as to be "more intelligent" than others. In the meantime, in a society in which numerical skills are valued most other individuals might be regarded as to be "more intelligent".