Issues


The future of work: Technology, jobs and augmented intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Work as we know it is in a state of flux. Technology is imposing rapid change, and the rise in automation capabilities and artificial intelligence are the chief catalysts. As Salesforce's Futurist, I spend a lot of time forward-thinking and analysing trend data, and have shared my thoughts on what this technological change means for the future of work and how to navigate it. There's a lot of angst in the world right now that the rise of smart technologies are going to disemploy vast numbers of people. I appreciate why there's anxiety, but if we look at history as a predictor of the future, this simplistic idea that'technology steals jobs' is unfounded.


When algorithms discriminate: Robotics, AI and ethics

Al Jazeera

We live in an age of rapid technological advances where artificial intelligence (AI) is a reality, not a science fiction fantasy. Every day we rely on algorithms to communicate, do our banking online, book a holiday - even introduce us to potential partners. Driverless cars and robots may be the headline makers, but AI is being used for everything from diagnosing illnesses to helping police predict crime hot spots. As machines become more advanced, how does society keep pace when deciding the ethics and regulations governing technology? Al Jazeera talks to Stephen Roberts, professor of Machine Learning at the University of Oxford, United Kingdom, on the role machine learning plays in our lives today - and in the future.


UN panel to debate 'killer robots' and other AI weapons

#artificialintelligence

A United Nations panel agreed Friday to consider guidelines and potential limitations for military uses of artificial intelligence amid concerns from human rights groups and other leaders that so-called "killer robots" could pose a long-term, lethal threat to humanity. Advocacy groups warned about the threats posed by such "killer robots" and aired a chilling video illustrating their possible uses on the sidelines of the first formal U.N. meeting of government experts on Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems this week. More than 80 countries took part. Ambassador Amandeep Gill of India, who chaired the gathering, said participants plan to meet again in 2018. He said ideas discussed this week included the creation of legally binding instrument, a code of conduct, or a technology review process.


Panel aims to pull plug on killer robots

Boston Herald

A U.N. panel agreed yesterday to move ahead with talks to define and possibly set limits on weapons that can kill without human involvement, as human rights groups said governments are moving too slowly to keep up with advances in artificial intelligence that could put computers in control one day. Advocacy groups warned about the threats posed by such "killer robots" and aired a chilling video illustrating their possible uses on the sidelines of the first formal U.N. meeting of government experts on Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems this week. More than 80 countries took part. Ambassador Amandeep Gill of India, who chaired the gathering, said participants plan to meet again in 2018. He said ideas discussed this week included the creation of legally binding instrument, a code of conduct, or a technology review process.


Killer robots, an increasingly real fiction.

#artificialintelligence

Are killer robots an imminent threat? Well it said this is not real but who knows? There are developing thousand of unnamed military drone.


First U.N. talks on rules for 'killer robots' end amid calls for faster action

The Japan Times

GENEVA – "Robots are not taking over the world," the diplomat leading the first official talks on autonomous weapons assured the meeting Friday, seeking to ease criticism over slow progress toward restricting the use of "killer robots." The United Nations was wrapping up an initial five days of discussions on weapons systems that can identify and destroy targets without human control. Experts say such weapons will soon be ready for battle. The meeting of the U.N.'s Convention on Conventional Weapons (CCW) marked an initial step toward rules governing such weapons. But activists warned that time is running out and that the glacial pace of the U.N.-brokered discussions is not responding to an arms race already underway.


UN panel agrees to move ahead with debate on killer robots

Daily Mail

A U.N. panel agreed Friday to move ahead with talks to define and possibly set limits on weapons that can kill without human involvement, as human rights groups said governments are moving too slowly to keep up with advances in artificial intelligence that could put computers in control one day. Advocacy groups warned about the threats posed by such'killer robots' and aired a chilling video illustrating their possible uses on the sidelines of the first formal U.N. meeting of government experts on Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems this week. More than 80 countries took part. The meeting falls under the U.N.'s Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons - also known as the Inhumane Weapons Convention - a 37-year old agreement that has set limits on the use of arms and explosives like mines, blinding laser weapons and booby traps over the years. The meeting falls under the U.N.'s Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons - also known as the Inhumane Weapons Convention - a 37-year old agreement that has set limits on the use of arms and explosives like mines, blinding laser weapons and booby traps over the years.


UN Panel Agrees to Move Ahead With Debate on 'Killer Robots'

U.S. News

A U.N. panel agreed Friday to move ahead with talks to define and possibly set limits on weapons that can kill without human involvement, as human rights groups said governments are moving too slowly to keep up with advances in artificial intelligence that could put computers in control one day.


How Can We Trust Machine Learning and AI? - InformationWeek

@machinelearnbot

During the 2008 financial crisis, the banking industry realized that their machine learning algorithms were based on flawed assumptions. So financial system regulators decided that additional controls were needed, and regulatory requirements for "model risk" management on banks and insurers were introduced. Banks also had to prove that they understood the models they were using, so, regrettably but understandably, they deliberately limited the complexity of their technology, resorting to generalized linear models that offered simplicity and interpretability above all else. In the past several years, machine learning and AI have made enormous strides in accuracy. Yet regulated industries (like banking) remain hesitant, often prioritizing regulatory compliance and algorithm interpretability over accuracy and efficiency.


How Artificial Intelligence Will Transform Healthcare Industry In Next 5 Years

#artificialintelligence

We've been overusing the term Artificial Intelligence and AI with everyone we meet online and offline. Mostly inspired by its influence in multiple industries. The way industries are employing this smart technology is indeed overwhelming. In fact, the use of machine learning, artificial intelligence, and deep learning is becoming pervasive in all walks of life. This ubiquitous and generous use of AI gives us a tonne of hope and curiosity about how Artificial Intelligence is going to help us deal with our day-to-day hardships.