Cognitive Architectures


Cognitive computing applications refocus developers' skills

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This is the fourth in a continuing series of stories previewing sessions of importance to cloud application developers at the Cloud Expo conference, which takes place June 7 to 9 at the Jacob Javits Center in New York. Judith Hurwitz is president and CEO of Hurwitz & Associates, a Needham, Mass., research and consulting firm focused on emerging technology, including big data, cognitive computing and governance. She is co-author of the book Cognitive Computing and Big Data Analytics, published in 2015. Her Cloud Expo session, "What Is the Business Imperative for Cognitive Computing?" is scheduled for Wednesday, June 8, at 8:40 a.m. In it, she puts cognitive computing into perspective with its value to the business, examines what it takes to build a cognitive application and identifies the types of services that best fit this data-driven approach.


Cognitive Computing: More Human Than Artificial Intelligence

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Mistaking cognitive computing for just another AI misses the important contributions this computing platform offers. In 2011, two episodes of Jeopardy stunned the world when the best Jeopardy players in the history squared off against IBM's Watson Cognitive Computing System and were soundly beaten. For many, this was the moment when artificial intelligence probably became a very real thing in their minds; one contestant even scrawled "I, for one, welcome our future computer overlords" on his answer in his final losing round. He likely spoke for many in the audience. Watson dominated a game where nuanced wordplay was intrinsic to the challenge of the contest, where contestants needed to provide the question that fit an answer shrouded in double meaning.


What Everyone Should Know About Cognitive Computing

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Artificial intelligence has been a far-flung goal of computing since the conception of the computer, but we may be getting closer than ever with new cognitive computing models. Cognitive computing comes from a mashup of cognitive science -- the study of the human brain and how it functions -- and computer science, and the results will have far-reaching impacts on our private lives, healthcare, business, and more. The goal of cognitive computing is to simulate human thought processes in a computerized model. Using self-learning algorithms that use data mining, pattern recognition and natural language processing, the computer can mimic the way the human brain works. While computers have been faster at calculations and processing than humans for decades, they haven't been able to accomplish tasks that humans take for granted as simple, like understanding natural language, or recognizing unique objects in an image.


Can Cognitive Tools Succeed Where Humans Have Failed?

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"Human analysis is very limited. We quickly get overwhelmed," says Leyla Bilge, a member of the Symantec Research Labs whose team studies the future use of artificial intelligence in blocking attacks. "AI on the other hand can handle millions of calculations in a second. It can identify malicious activity that humans miss." The good news is that advances in AI, machine learning, and advanced behavioral analytics may change the equation in security's favor.


Cognitive Computing: More Human Than Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Mistaking cognitive computing for just another AI misses the important contributions this computing platform offers. In 2011, two episodes of Jeopardy stunned the world when the best Jeopardy players in the history squared off against IBM's Watson Cognitive Computing System and were soundly beaten. For many, this was the moment when artificial intelligence probably became a very real thing in their minds; one contestant even scrawled "I, for one, welcome our future computer overlords" on his answer in his final losing round. He likely spoke for many in the audience. Watson dominated a game where nuanced wordplay was intrinsic to the challenge of the contest, where contestants needed to provide the question that fit an answer shrouded in double meaning.


Cognitive Computing: More Human Than Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Mistaking cognitive computing for just another AI misses the important contributions this computing platform offers. In 2011, two episodes of Jeopardy stunned the world when the best Jeopardy players in the history squared off against IBM's Watson Cognitive Computing System and were soundly beaten. For many, this was the moment when artificial intelligence probably became a very real thing in their minds; one contestant even scrawled "I, for one, welcome our future computer overlords" on his answer in his final losing round. He likely spoke for many in the audience. Watson dominated a game where nuanced wordplay was intrinsic to the challenge of the contest, where contestants needed to provide the question that fit an answer shrouded in double meaning.


CPAs cite AI, machine learning, and cognitive computing as top hard tech trends Sage Advice US

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Artificial intelligence, machine learning, and cognitive computing in audit and tax are the top trends that will impact the accounting and finance world over the next three years, according to research conducted by the Maryland Association of CPAs, the Business Learning Institute, and world-renowned futurist Daniel Burrus. The research began with Burrus' "Top 20 Technology-Driven Hard Trends Shaping 2018 and Beyond." Using Burrus' annual list as a starting point, MACPA Executive Director Tom Hood asked more than 1,000 CPAs and finance and accounting professionals which of those trends will have the greatest impact on the profession over the next three years. "These trends highlight enormous, game-changing opportunities in a broad array of applications and industries," Burrus has said. "As you read through them, look for opportunities for you to leverage them and become a positive disruptor."


What are the challenges, real-life use cases and advantages of Cognitive Computing? - Maruti Techlabs

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Cognitive computing has taken the tech industry by storm and has become the new buzzword among entrepreneurs and tech enthusiasts. Based on the basic premise of stimulating the human thought process, the applications and advantages of cognitive computing are a step beyond the conventional AI systems. According to David Kenny, General Manager, IBM Watson – the most advanced cognitive computing framework, "AI can only be as smart as the people teaching it." The same is not true for the latest cognitive revolution. Cognitive computing process uses a blend of artificial intelligence, neural networks, machine learning, natural language processing, sentiment analysis and contextual awareness to solve day-to-day problems just like humans.


Taming Big Data with Cognitive Computing AI - Global IQX

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In the complex, diverse insurance industry, it can be hard to reconcile theory and practice. Adapting to new processes, systems, and strategies is always challenging. However, with the arrival of new opportunities driven insurtech, cultural transformation will go smoother. Insurance companies that are considering how to plug into the insurtech landscape should understand the various models within the innovation ecosystem. Carriers have to weigh their options carefully before choosing between incubators and accelerators, or venture capital and partnerships, when creating their best internal and external teams.


How To Boost An Organization's Competitive Advantage By Using Cognitive Computing

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Between AI-powered chatbots and gadget-based voice assistants, cognitive computing capabilities have captured the public imagination. But consumer products are just the tip of the iceberg. Under the surface, cognitive computing adoption in the business world is growing rapidly. In fact, IDC predicts that global spending on cognitive systems will grow to more than $31 billion by 2019. And within the next two years alone, half of all consumers are expected to interact with cognitive technology on a regular basis, even if they don't realize it.