Poker


World Series of Poker Tournament Opens in Las Vegas

U.S. News

Participants in this year's edition of the poker extravaganza will see two changes: no firm "shot clock" and the return of the tradition of crowning the tournament's main event champion in July. Buy-ins for the 74-event tournament, which runs through July 22 at the Rio All-Suite Hotel and Casino, range from $333 to $111,111.


A top poker-playing algorithm is cleaning up in China

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A previous version of the bot defeated several top professional players in a tournament held at a Pittsburgh casino over several weeks this January. A new and improved version of the CMU bot--called Lengpudashi, which means "cold poker master" in Chinese--defeated a team made up of poker-playing AI researchers at the Hainan event. Around the same time that CMU's poker bot won in Pittsburgh, another research team, made up of academics from Canada and the Czech Republic, developed a poker-playing algorithm that also defeated several professional players. The event will involve pairing human players with AlphaGo to explore opportunities for collaborative play.


Rose, Garcia Tied for Lead at Masters in Prelude to Finale

U.S. News

Garcia hung his head in the 13th fairway when his 4-iron shot disappeared off a bank toward the tributary of Rae's Creek. Moments later, he realized the ball bounced softly enough off the side of the bank to stop halfway down. He chipped up to tap-in range, turning a potential bogey into a birdie.



University of Alberta poker bot Deepstack defeats Texas Hold 'em pros - Cantech Letter

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The University of Alberta's Computer Poker Research Group created DeepStack, an artificial intelligence program that defeated professional human poker players at heads-up, no-limit Texas hold'em. Apart from this win being the first of its kind, it bares significance in assisting to make better medical treatment recommendations to developing improved strategic defense planning, stated DeepStack: Expert-level artificial intelligence in heads-up no-limit poker, which was published in Science. In a similar case from May 11, 1997, Deep Blue, an IBM computer, outsmarted the world chess champion after six games –the computer had two wins, the champion won a single match, and there were three draws. The AI program was pitted against, "a pool of professional poker players recruited by the International Federation of Poker.


Computers can now challenge -- and beat -- professional poker players at Texas hold 'em

Los Angeles Times

Doug Polk, one of the world's best poker players, shoveled egg whites into his mouth with a plastic fork and slurped unsweetened oatmeal from a paper cup, 13 days into the oddest tournament he has ever entered. His opponent, Claudico, did not struggle with fatigue, mental breakdown or hunger, despite... Doug Polk, one of the world's best poker players, shoveled egg whites into his mouth with a plastic fork and slurped unsweetened oatmeal from a paper cup, 13 days into the oddest tournament he has ever entered. The European Space Agency's Rosetta orbiter will commit operational suicide early Friday morning, but first it has just a little bit more science to do. The European Space Agency's Rosetta orbiter will commit operational suicide early Friday morning, but first it has just a little bit more science to do.


Time to Fold, Humans: Poker-Playing AI Beats Pros at Texas Hold'em

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A study published today in Science describes an AI system called DeepStack that recently defeated professional human players in heads-up, no-limit Texas hold'em poker, an achievement that represents a leap forward in the types of problems AI systems can solve. DeepStack, developed by researchers at the University of Alberta, relies on the use of artificial neural networks that researchers trained ahead of time to develop poker intuition. Twenty years ago game-playing AI had a breakthrough when IBM's chess-playing supercomputer Deep Blue defeated World Chess Champion Garry Kasparov. The answers allowed DeepStack's neural networks (complex networks of computations that can "learn" over time) to develop general poker intuition that it could apply even in situations it had never encountered before.


Texas Hold'em AI Bot Taps Deep Learning to Demolish Humans

IEEE Spectrum Robotics Channel

DeepStack's poker-playing success while running on fairly standard computer hardware could make it much more practical for AI to tackle many other "imperfect-information" situations involving business negotiations, medical diagnoses and treatments, or even guiding military robots on patrol. To train DeepStack's intuition, researchers turned to deep learning. A Carnegie Mellon University AI called Libratus achieved its statistically significant victory against four poker pros during a marathon tournament of 120,000 games total played in January 2017. But to achieve victory, Libratus still calculated its main poker-playing strategy ahead of time based on abstracted game solving--a computer- and time-intensive process that required 15 million processor-core hours on a new supercomputer called Bridges.


Square Enix Announces New Fantasy RPG Codenamed 'Project Prelude Rune'

International Business Times

Video game developer and publisher Square Enix is mostly known for franchises like "Final Fantasy" and "Kingdom Hearts," and now the company is working on a new property. The upcoming new IP has the working title "Project Prelude Rune" and it will be a role-playing game (RPG) that will be developed by a new studio. As for what "Project Prelude Rune" will actually be about, Square Enix described it as a new RPG with a new fantasy set in a vast land with teeming life. "Project Prelude Rune" appears to be in it's very early stages of development and it might not be out any time soon.


Poker players are getting much better thanks to AI

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Since the bot's predecessor, Claudico, was almost good enough to beat top players, and Libratus is supposed to be a lot better, the humans could be in trouble. As for how this plays out in Hold'em, a game where players can bet after being dealt two cards ("the pocket") and again after seeing three shared cards ("the flop") and a fourth shared card ("the turn") and a fifth shared card ("the river"), Les gave a couple of examples: Les, in an email, writes that three-bets these days are often 50% larger than they used to be. Libratus, created at CMU by Tuomas Sandholm and PhD student Noam Brown, aims to be the first bot that can beat top human players at Head's Up No-Limit Hold'em. No-limit means there's no limit to bets: it's harder to solve than limit hold'em, which a bot from the University of Alberta conquered in 2015.