Passenger


The End of Car Ownership

Wall Street Journal

And startups will spring up to develop services that this new ownership model demands--perhaps even create whole new industries around self-driving cars and ride sharing. A study by Deloitte Consulting, for example, estimates that the cost of personal car ownership is on average 97 cents a mile today but could drop by two-thirds in a world of shared, self-driving vehicles--a tipping point that could usher the technology into daily life for many people. As a result of both driverless cars and fleets of robot taxis, sales of conventionally purchased automobiles may likely drop. Zoox, a startup valued at more than $1.5 billion, is working on designing a robot taxi that takes the entire riding experience into consideratio


Uber's Next CEO Has to Face This Huge Challenge

TIME

Bradley Tusk, founder of Tusk Ventures who was an advisor to Uber, remembers the first time he met Travis Kalanick more than six years ago. Since Uber's inception in 2009, venture capitalists have poured money to stake a claim in Kalanick's vision of the future, making it the most valuable startup in the world worth nearly $70 billion. Uber's next CEO must be equal parts innovator and mediator, a leader that can address the company's cultural troubles while also maintaining the focus and vision that lead Kalanick's company to upend the taxi industry. "[But] the person who can actually think about how to make flying cars happen, there aren't a lot of those."


Uber's rocky year: Travis Kalanick's resignation is just the latest thing

Los Angeles Times

The plaintiff, identified only as Jane Doe, filed the lawsuit against Uber's chief executive, Travis Kalanick; its former head of business, Emil Michael; and its former vice president of business in Asia, Eric Alexander. Uber CEO Travis Kalanick announced in a memo to employees that he was taking a leave of absence, acknowledging a humiliating year in which the company was accused of mishandling the medical records of a passenger who was raped by an Uber driver in India; of using trade secrets allegedly stolen from a self-driving car firm that belongs to Google's parent company; and of covering up sexual harassment allegations. Emil Michael -- Uber's senior vice president of business and Chief Executive Travis Kalanick's right-hand man -- has left the ride-hailing company, according to an email he sent to employees. Executive fired after reports he shared rape victim's medical records Eric Alexander, Uber's president of business in the Asia-Pacific region, was fired after questions were raised about reports that he obtained and shared with other executives the medical records of a woman who was raped by her Uber driver in India in 2014.


Man killed in 2016 Tesla autopilot crash didn't follow car warnings

USATODAY

Joshua Brown didn't keep his hands on the wheel, despite repeated vehicle warnings, according to the National Transportation Safety Board. A link has been sent to your friend's email address. A link has been posted to your Facebook feed. Joshua Brown didn't keep his hands on the wheel, despite repeated vehicle warnings, according to the National Transportation Safety Board.


Uber's toxic culture risks its driverless future too

#artificialintelligence

Scandal after scandal has hammered the company in recent times, culminating in an external investigation into a corporate culture accused by a former female employee of being rife with sexism, aggression and inequality. So make no mistake, Uber's investors have calculated the company's toxic culture under Kalanick's leadership is a risk to their long term investment. The message from Uber's investors is clear: aggressive tech bros out; responsibility, accountability, empathy and diversity in. Uber's most recent valuation is $70BN -- although it's not clear what portion of value investors are attaching to its autonomous long term vision.


The End of Car Ownership

#artificialintelligence

And startups will spring up to develop services that this new ownership model demands--perhaps even create whole new industries around self-driving cars and ride sharing. A study by Deloitte Consulting, for example, estimates that the cost of personal car ownership is on average 97 cents a mile today but could drop by two-thirds in a world of shared, self-driving vehicles--a tipping point that could usher the technology into daily life for many people. As a result of both driverless cars and fleets of robot taxis, sales of conventionally purchased automobiles may likely drop. Zoox, a startup valued at more than $1.5 billion, is working on designing a robot taxi that takes the entire riding experience into consideratio


Official: VW Bus is back!

FOX News

VW brand Chairman Herbert Diess has confirmed to Auto Express that a model based on the electric I.D. Buzz features a battery pack mounted flat in the floor, Tesla Model X-style, that VW says is good for 270 miles of range and is equipped with a wireless charging system that can deliver an 80 percent charge in just 30 minutes. Buzz features a highly configurable interior, with seats that can be turned into tables and beds, and front chairs that can be rotated to face the back. That's because it was designed with fully-autonomous driving capabilities in mind, something VW hopes to add by as early as 2025.


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New Scientist

To demonstrate the power of a new chip that can run artificially intelligent algorithms, researchers have put it in a doll and programmed it to recognise emotions in facial images captured by a small camera. The total cost of putting the new chip together is just €115 – an indicator of how easy it is becoming to give devices basic AI abilities. Recent advances in AI mean we already have algorithms that can recognise objects, lip-read, make basic decisions and more. "We will have wearable devices, toys, drones, small robots, and things we can't even imagine yet that will all have basic artificial intelligence," says Deniz.


Dubai's self-flying taxis are primed for takeoff later this year

Mashable

The "Future City" is about to add another space-age service you won't find anywhere else in the world: autonomous passenger drones. Dubai's much-hyped autonomous aerial taxi (AAT) service, which made waves back in February when it was announced as part of its World Government Summit, is finally, officially on track. The autonomous drone taxis will fly passengers on predetermined routes throughout the city, serving as more of a sky shuttle service than a true go-anywhere taxi. The first version of the air taxi project used the Ehang 184, a 500-pound, single-seat passenger drone.


The long, winding road for driverless cars

#artificialintelligence

Fitted with wide-angle cameras, GPS sensors and short-range radars, Level 2 vehicles can adapt their speed to the surrounding traffic automatically, maintain a safe distance from the vehicle ahead, keep within their own lane, and even park themselves occasionally. Similar human failings have led to countless airline accidents--most recently, the Asiana Airlines crash at San Francisco in 2013. The most crucial piece of technology needed to make that happen is lidar (light detection and ranging). But as far as autonomous vehicles go, the real value lies not in the laser hardware, but in the software that combines lidar images with signals from radar detectors and video cameras, and overlays the resulting 3D map with GPS data.