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The hidden seismic symphony in earthquake signals

#artificialintelligence

Few months go by without another devastating earthquake somewhere in the world reminding us how we all remain at the mercy of major seismic events that strike without warning. But a new branch of geophysics powered by machine learning is uncovering fresh insights into the earth's slipping faults that often trigger these catastrophic earthquakes. Machine learning, which often goes by the catchier moniker of artificial intelligence, has captured the public's imagination with its promises of fully autonomous cars and the approaching "singularity" when machines out-think people. The current state of the art, however, shows little signs of true intelligence, such as the ability to abstract the principles behind a given phenomenon. In image recognition, AI systems learn from rote memorization to identify objects and are, therefore, often fooled.


Autonomous driving startup Pony.ai raises $462 million in Toyota-led funding

The Japan Times

HONG KONG/BEIJING – Autonomous driving firm Pony.ai said it raised $462 million in its latest funding round, led by an investment by Toyota Motor Corp. Toyota invested around $400 million (¥44.2 billion) in the round, Pony.ai said in a statement Wednesday, marking its biggest investment in an autonomous driving company with a Chinese background. The latest fund raising values the three-year-old firm, already backed by Sequoia Capital China and Beijing Kunlun Tech Co., at slightly more than $3 billion. The investment by Japan's largest automaker comes at a time when global carmakers, technology firms, start-ups and investors -- including Tesla, Alphabet Inc.'s Waymo and Uber -- are pouring capital into developing self-driving vehicles. Over the past two years, 323 deals related to autonomous cars raised a total of $14.6 billion worldwide, according to data provider PitchBook, even amid concerns about the technology given its high cost and complexity. The Silicon Valley-based startup Pony.ai -- co-founded by CEO James Peng, a former executive at China's Baidu, and chief technology officer Lou Tiancheng, a former Google and Baidu engineer -- is already testing autonomous vehicles in California, Beijing and Guangzhou.


Autonomous driving startup Pony.ai raises $462 million in Toyota-led funding

The Japan Times

HONG KONG/BEIJING – Autonomous driving firm Pony.ai said on Wednesday it has raised $462 million in its latest funding round, led by an investment by Japan's largest automaker Toyota Motor Corp. Toyota invested around $400 million (¥44.2 billion) in the round, Pony.ai said in a statement, marking its biggest investment in an autonomous driving company with a Chinese background. The latest fund raising values the three-year-old firm, already backed by Sequoia Capital China and Beijing Kunlun Tech Co, at slightly more than $3 billion. The investment by Toyota comes at a time when global car makers, technology firms, start-ups and investors -- including Tesla, Alphabet Inc's Waymo and Uber -- are pouring capital into developing self-driving vehicles. Over the past two years, 323 deals related to autonomous cars raised a total of $14.6 billion worldwide, according to data provider PitchBook, even amid concerns about the technology given its high cost and complexity. The Silicon Valley-based startup Pony.ai -- co-founded by CEO James Peng, a former executive at China's Baidu, and chief technology officer Lou Tiancheng, a former Google and Baidu engineer -- is already testing autonomous vehicles in California, Beijing and Guangzhou.


Crowdsourcing Moral Machines

Communications of the ACM

Robots and other artificial intelligence (AI) systems are transitioning from performing well-defined tasks in closed environments to becoming significant physical actors in the real world. No longer confined within the walls of factories, robots will permeate the urban environment, moving people and goods around, and performing tasks alongside humans. Perhaps the most striking example of this transition is the imminent rise of automated vehicles (AVs). They are expected to increase the efficiency of transportation, and free up millions of person-hours of productivity. Even more importantly, they promise to drastically reduce the number of deaths and injuries from traffic accidents.12,30 Indeed, AVs are arguably the first human-made artifact to make autonomous decisions with potential life-and-death consequences on a broad scale. This marks a qualitative shift in the consequences of design choices made by engineers. The decisions of AVs will generate indirect negative consequences, such as consequences affecting the physical integrity of third parties not involved in their adoption--for example, AVs may prioritize the safety of their passengers over that of pedestrians.


Tables, footrests, smart speakers: Self-driving cars could become the living rooms of the future

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

When you slide into the car of the future, you may feel like you've already reached your destination. You'll sit at tables, under ambient lighting, getting help from voice assistants as you stretch out your legs in reclining seats. And that's appealing to many Americans who already know they want to sleep, send emails or play video games as they zip down the road in a car that operates itself. With self-driving vehicles on the horizon, automakers are rethinking what the future of car interiors will look like. And because these completely autonomous cars, called Level 5 vehicles, will free drivers from focusing on the highway, companies are now free to experiment.


Driver Assistance Technologies And Levels Of Autonomy Explained: Viable For India?

#artificialintelligence

Autonomous emergency braking (AEB) is a continuously-on system which detects proximity with obstacles ahead. If the system detects an imminent crash, it warns the driver and primes the braking system. If the driver fails to respond, the car applies the brakes with as much force as necessary to prevent collision. Some AEB systems can also detect cyclists and pedestrians which may be hidden behind a blind spot until its too late. However, this isn't an assistance system -- you can't use an AEB-equipped car to take your foot off the brake in traffic.


Imaging Scientist - Autonomous Driving ai-jobs.net

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At Aptiv, we believe that our mobility solutions have the power to change the world. Our Autonomous Mobility team is focused on developing and commercializing self-driving cars and systems that enable point-to-point mobility in challenging urban driving environments. With talented teams working across the globe in Boston, Pittsburgh, Las Vegas, Santa Monica, and Singapore, Aptiv is the first company to deploy commercial robotaxis to the public. Today, Aptiv has provided over 80,000 autonomous rides to members of the public passengers in Las Vegas -- the world's largest public deployment of self-driving vehicles. In September 2019, Aptiv announced a 50/50 joint venture with Hyundai Motor Group, bringing together HMG and Aptiv's advanced engineering and R&D capabilities, our global footprint, and shared commitment to advancing autonomous driving technology.


Prediction and Behavior Modeling Research Scientist ai-jobs.net

#artificialintelligence

Our Autonomous Mobility team is focused on developing and commercializing self-driving cars and systems that enable point-to-point mobility in challenging urban driving environments. With talented teams working across the globe in Boston, Pittsburgh, Las Vegas, Santa Monica, and Singapore, Aptiv is the first company to deploy commercial robotaxis to the public. Today, Aptiv has provided over 80,000 autonomous rides to members of the public passengers in Las Vegas -- the world's largest public deployment of self-driving vehicles. In September 2019, Aptiv announced a 50/50 joint venture with Hyundai Motor Group, bringing together HMG and Aptiv's advanced engineering and R&D capabilities, our global footprint, and shared commitment to advancing autonomous driving technology. Come work with leading engineers, research scientists, marketers and business development experts, all while enabling the future of mobility!


Engineering the Future of Maps at Uber

#artificialintelligence

Maps are at the heart of Uber's services and core to the experience for millions of users. Our cutting-edge cartography makes it easy for drivers to locate passengers, delivery people to quickly transport meals via Uber Eats, and JUMP users to hop on the closest scooter or bike. Maps aren't always flashy (although many of our Uber Movement data visualizations are quite striking), but they're incredibly important. In fact, the nature of our maps technology means that if our users take them for granted, we're doing a good job. Underlying the graphical representation of streets and places exists a complex set of data allowing algorithms to calculate optimal routes based on traffic, speed limits, and other properties.


Diffbot Infrastructure with Mike Tung - Software Engineering Daily

#artificialintelligence

Diffbot is a knowledge graph that allows developers to interface with the unstructured web as if it was a structured database. In today's show, Diffbot CEO Mike Tung returns for a second discussion about how he has built Diffbot and how Diffbot is used. The web has many different entities. Humans use a search engine to find answers to their questions within web pages. Machines need to find answers to these kinds of questions as well, but a machine is not sophisticated enough to figure out answers from an unstructured web page.