Passenger


Building the Model T for Gen Z

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Before long, the rideshares we summon with our phones may come without drivers. Though that's not a ride many would accept just yet, a number of companies are nearing launch phase on driverless robotaxi vehicles. Alphabet subsidiary Waymo launched the first limited commercial robotaxi service last December in Phoenix, and existing ride-hailing services like Uber and Lyft have partnerships and pilot projects in development in various test cities (mostly those with great weather and little traffic). GM's self-driving subsidiary, Cruise, has postponed its 2019 launch plans but continues testing in San Francisco using the electric Chevy Bolt. And dozens of other robotaxi projects are in various phases of development, including an ambitious plan by Elon Musk to encourage Tesla owners to allow their idle electric vehicles to "gig away" when idle and join other company-owned vehicles in a robotaxi fleet.


How Artificial Intelligence Can Level The Playing Field For Mid-Market Companies

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As a young child, I used to imagine what life would be like if I had a chauffeur to drive me wherever and whenever I wanted. Of course, this was a luxury afforded by only the wealthy and remained well out of reach for most people -- myself included. Fast forward to today, and the rise of the ride-sharing economy has essentially leveled the playing field, giving everyone affordable access to on-demand transportation. Access to artificial intelligence (AI) is poised to undergo a similar shift. Traditionally, large corporations and government entities have been ahead of the adoption curve because they've had the capital to invest in and the talent to leverage the technology.


Global Big Data Conference

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As a young child, I used to imagine what life would be like if I had a chauffeur to drive me wherever and whenever I wanted. Of course, this was a luxury afforded by only the wealthy and remained well out of reach for most people -- myself included. Fast forward to today, and the rise of the ride-sharing economy has essentially leveled the playing field, giving everyone affordable access to on-demand transportation. Access to artificial intelligence (AI) is poised to undergo a similar shift. Traditionally, large corporations and government entities have been ahead of the adoption curve because they've had the capital to invest in and the talent to leverage the technology.


Global Big Data Conference

#artificialintelligence

As a young child, I used to imagine what life would be like if I had a chauffeur to drive me wherever and whenever I wanted. Of course, this was a luxury afforded by only the wealthy and remained well out of reach for most people -- myself included. Fast forward to today, and the rise of the ride-sharing economy has essentially leveled the playing field, giving everyone affordable access to on-demand transportation. Access to artificial intelligence (AI) is poised to undergo a similar shift. Traditionally, large corporations and government entities have been ahead of the adoption curve because they've had the capital to invest in and the talent to leverage the technology.


Tech Tent: Can AI revolutionise health?

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If there's one area where there's real excitement about the improvements in our lives which advances in artificial intelligence could bring, it is healthcare. On Tech Tent this week we ask whether, amidst all the hope and hype, real innovations are beginning to transform the way patients are treated. At Oxford University's Said Business School, some of the leading thinkers in AI research - from the university and beyond - gathered this week. There were fascinating discussions about everything from autonomous cars to the way AI is transforming the finance industry. But the panels on healthcare drew big crowds and a sense that researchers were on the cusp of delivering concrete results which will soon begin to be seen in hospitals.


Driverless cars: Everything you need to know about autonomous car revolution

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SELF-DRIVING cars are in a constant state of development, with numerous companies including Tesla, Audi and Volvo (as well as technology giants such as Apple and Google) pouring millions of pounds into making the autonomous car technology roadworthy. Will it see a major shift in employment and work culture? Is the driver or the manufacturer liable in the event of an accident? How will legislation and layouts be changed to make self-driving cars compatible with UK roads? Auto Express has investigated the world of driverless car technology, to bring you the answers about the cutting edge of mobility.


AI 50: America's Most Promising Artificial Intelligence Companies

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Artificial intelligence is infiltrating every industry, allowing vehicles to navigate without drivers, assisting doctors with medical diagnoses, and mimicking the way humans speak. But for all the authentic and exciting ways it's transforming the tasks computers can perform, there's a lot of hype, too. As Jeremy Achin, CEO of newly minted unicorn DataRobot, puts it: "Everyone knows you have to have machine learning in your story or you're not sexy." The inherently broad term gets bandied about so often that it can start to feel meaningless and gets trotted out by companies to gussy up even simple data analysis. To help cut through the noise, Forbes and data partner Meritech Capital put together a list of private, U.S.-based companies that are wielding some subset of artificial intelligence in a meaningful way and demonstrating real business potential from doing so. One makes robots that can whir around shoppers to help workers restock shelves. Another scans recruiting pitches for unconscious bias. A third analyzes massive data sets to make street-by-street weather predictions. To be included on the list, companies needed to show that techniques like machine learning (where systems learn from data to improve on tasks), natural language processing (which enables programs to "understand" written or spoken language), or computer vision (which relates to how machines "see") are a core part of their business model and future success. Find all the details on our methodology here.


Saving nature through the use of AI and Machine Learning - KDR Recruitment

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In today's world it's easy to get swept up in the cool side of Artificial Intelligence. Whether it be a new Amazon Echo, autonomous cars or perhaps the new Boston Dynamics Robot, which now has the amazing ability to open a door (just watch the video on YouTube, you'll see what I mean). However, whilst the cool stuff is put right in front of our eyes, for us to fascinate over it's easy to forget about what goes on behind the scenes of Artificial Intelligence. Now I'm not saying that the tech, gadgets and robots aren't cool, they're very cool. In fact, I'm sure I'll be the first in line to buy an autonomous flying car, when the time comes.


AI 50: America's Most Promising Artificial Intelligence Companies

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence is infiltrating every industry, allowing vehicles to navigate without drivers, assisting doctors with medical diagnoses, and mimicking the way humans speak. But for all the authentic and exciting ways it's transforming the tasks computers can perform, there's a lot of hype, too. As Jeremy Achin, CEO of newly minted unicorn DataRobot, puts it: "Everyone knows you have to have machine learning in your story or you're not sexy." The inherently broad term gets bandied about so often that it can start to feel meaningless and can be trotted out by companies to gussy up even simple data analysis. To help cut through the noise, Forbes and data partner Meritech Capital put together a list of private, U.S.-based companies that are wielding some subset of artificial intelligence in a meaningful way and demonstrating real business potential from doing so. One makes robots that can whir around shoppers to help workers restock shelves. Another scans recruiting pitches for unconscious bias. A third analyzes massive data sets to make street-by-street weather predictions. To be included on the list, companies needed to show that techniques like machine learning (where systems learn from data to improve on tasks), natural language processing (which enables programs to "understand" written or spoken language), or computer vision (which relates to how machines "see") are a core part of their business model and future success. Find all the details on our methodology here.


Gatwick to use facial recognition at boarding

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Gatwick has become the UK's first airport to confirm it will use facial-recognition cameras on a permanent basis for ID checks before passengers board planes. It follows a self-boarding trial carried out in partnership with EasyJet last year. The London airport said the technology should reduce queuing times but travellers would still need to carry passports. On Tuesday, a spokeswoman for Gatwick told BBC News it had taken the decision, first reported by the Telegraph newspaper, after reviewing feedback from passengers in the earlier test. "More than 90% of those interviewed said they found the technology extremely easy to use and the trial demonstrated faster boarding of the aircraft for the airline and a significant reduction in queue time for passengers," she said.