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HOW ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IS SHAPING ASSISTANCE SERVICES

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Due to the fact that telematics monitoring is almost standard in most vehicles these days, it is possible for AI to track the exact location of a car and automatically dispatch emergency assistance, should it be determined that an accident has taken place. Furthermore, the future use of driverless cars will integrate seamlessly into assistance centres, with AI diagnosing the problem and then digitally dispatching assistance, should it be deemed necessary. It is also becoming widely accepted that AI will be able to generate unique policies for each customer, based on their preferences and risk profile. AI-enabled assistance services will be able to render assistance services to these products without the risk of getting tied up between the different policy exclusions and limits. When we look at what is happening in the insurance industry currently, it is clear that it is in its Fourth Industrial Revolution.


Hoo-boy! This damning Uber letter is a wild ride

Mashable

The disasters that former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick left in his wake at his popular ride-hailing app company was one of this year's biggest tech industry stories. Now, as we wrap up the year, Uber (through a court case) has gifted us a letter detailing many of the company's alleged wrongdoings and spy tactics. The so-called Jacobs letter was written by an attorney representing Richard Jacobs, a former Uber security analyst. It alleges shady and potential illegal operations, including how Uber employees monitored the competition and acquired trade secrets. SEE ALSO: Uber's new CEO says he banned employees from using secure messaging apps for Uber business The letter is among the evidence in the trial between Uber and Waymo, Alphabet's self-driving car division.


'Jacobs letter' unsealed, accuses Uber of spying, hacking

Engadget

Waymo's lawsuit against Uber for allegedly stealing technology for self-driving cars hasn't gone to trial yet, because the judge received a letter from the Department of Justice suggesting Uber withheld crucial evidence. That letter, with some redactions, is now available for all to read and it's not good news for Uber. It was written by the attorney of a former employee, Richard Jacobs, and it contains claims that the company routinely tried to hack its competitors to gain an edge, used a team of spies to steal secrets or surveil political figures and even bugged meetings between transport regulators -- with some of this information delivered directly to former CEO Travis Kalanick. Alphabet's self-driving arm Waymo is making the case that Anthony Levandowski created the autonomous trucking company Otto as a scheme to steal its trade secrets and sell them to Uber. In the letter, it says that members of the Uber SSG team Jacobs worked on traveled to Pittsburgh after it acquired the company to instruct Otto employees on how to use burner phones and ephemeral communications apps to avoid discovery in an expected lawsuit.


New Evidence Could Blow Open the Uber/Waymo Self-Driving Lawsuit

WIRED

Today, after three weeks of legal hemming and hawing, the Northern District of California finally made public a potentially key piece of evidence in the rollicking, roiling, rolling trade secrets lawsuit between self-driving Alphabet spinoff Waymo and ridehailing company Uber. That evidence is the Jacobs Letter, a 37-page rundown of truly outrageous allegations about Uber's business practices, put to paper by the lawyer for former Uber employee Ric Jacobs. Originally sent to Uber's lawyers as part of a dispute between the company and Jacobs, it's now at the center of Uber's legal fight with Waymo. And while the letter's contents most definitely have not been proven true, they include some tremendous new assertions: that former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick himself directed trade theft; that the company employed spies to trail competitors' executives; that it illegally recorded a call with employees about sexual assault allegations; and that it used a meme-filled slideshow to teach employees how to hide implicating documents from nosy lawyers. In February, Waymo sued Uber for trade secret theft.


Will Robots Take Our Children's Jobs?

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But that job is suddenly looking iffy as A.I. gets better at reading scans. A start-up called Arterys, to cite just one example, already has a program that can perform a magnetic-resonance imaging analysis of blood flow through a heart in just 15 seconds, compared with the 45 minutes required by humans. Maybe she wants to be a surgeon, but that job may not be safe, either. Robots already assist surgeons in removing damaged organs and cancerous tissue, according to Scientific American. Last year, a prototype robotic surgeon called STAR (Smart Tissue Autonomous Robot) outperformed human surgeons in a test in which both had to repair the severed intestine of a live pig.


India witnessed infusion of Artificial Intelligence across industries

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When it comes to disruptive technologies that will drive businesses in the coming years, Artificial Intelligence (AI) is touted as the most promising and Indian enterprises across the spectrum began embracing it to enhance real-time user experiences. Picking up the pace globally, AI gradually cemented its position as the technology is quite transverse and perceived as less gimmicky, impacting several functions to improve productivity and business results, says Thomas Husson, Vice President and Principal Analyst, Forrester. From flushing out fake and terror-related content to making sense of humongous data for self-driving cars, from helping identify when someone might be expressing thoughts of suicide on Facebook to empower NASA explore space communications, AI-based tools gained a definite momentum. Microsoft pledged $50 million over the next five years to put AI technology in the hands of those who are working to mitigate climate change. When it comes to India, AI started playing a significant role in not just developing smart devices but in improving engagement with end-consumers -- be it government or corporates.


Uber stole trade secrets, bribed foreign officials and spied on rivals, filing says

The Guardian

Uber allegedly engaged in a range of "unethical and unlawful intelligence collections", including the theft of competitive trade secrets, bribery of foreign officials and spying on competitors and politicians, according to an explosive legal document published on Friday. It's the latest chapter in the discovery process for the company's messy legal squabble with Waymo, Google's driverless car spin-off, which has accused Uber of stealing trade secrets. The details were outlined in a 37-page demand letter filed by the ex-Uber security manager Richard Jacobs, who left the company earlier this year. The document paints a picture of a team of employees dedicated to spying on rivals and "impeding" legal investigations into the company. Jacobs alleges that when he raised concerns over the techniques being used, he was given a poor performance review and demoted as "pure retaliation" for refusing to buy into the culture of "achieving business goals through illegal conduct even though equally aggressive legal means were available".


Future of AI revenue: Top 10 uses cases for next decade

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Artificial intelligence already impacts many aspects of our daily lives at work, at home, and as we move about. Over the next decade, analyst firm Tractica predicts that annual Global AI enterprise software revenue will grow from $644 million in 2016 to nearly $39 billion by 2025, and services related revenue should reach almost $150 billion. These functional areas are applicable to many use cases, industries, and generate benefits for both businesses and individuals. Here are the top ten use cases which will reap financial rewards for AI technology product and service companies, and a broad spectrum of benefits for everyone else. Self driving cars and other autonomous vehicles are consistently called the "next revolution" in transportation, technology, and some say in civilization in general.


Tesla's New AI Guru Could Help Its Cars Teach Themselves

@machinelearnbot

Elon Musk has hired a new director of AI research at Tesla, and it may signal a plan to rethink the way its automated driving works. This week, Musk poached Andrej Karpathy, an expert on vision, deep learning, and reinforcement learning, from OpenAI, a nonprofit that Musk and others are funding that's dedicated to "discovering and enacting the path to safe artificial general intelligence." Karpathy, who will apparently report directly to Musk, is a rising star in the world of AI, having studied at Stanford with Fei-Fei Li, a leading AI expert who is now the chief scientist of Google Cloud. Li is famous in tech circles for having developed a data set of images that helped inspire a breakthrough in machine vision. Many have pointed to Karpathy's expertise in computer vision as a key asset for Tesla, and that's true.


Musk Says Tesla Is Building Its Own Chip for Autopilot

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Rockets, electric cars, solar panels, batteries--whirlwind industrialist Elon Musk has set about reinventing one after another. Thursday, he added another ambitious project to the list: Future Tesla vehicles will run their self-driving AI software on a chip designed by the automaker itself. "We are developing customized AI hardware chips," Musk told a room of AI experts from companies such as Alphabet and Uber on the sidelines of the world's leading AI conference. Musk claimed that the chips' processing power would help Tesla's Autopilot automated-driving function save more lives, more quickly, by hastening the day it can drive at least 10 times more safely than a human. "We get there faster if we have dedicated AI hardware," he said.