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The SmartShuttles go on-demand in Uvrier

#artificialintelligence

Five years after the launch of the "SmartShuttle" project, world's first commercial deployment of self-driving buses in public transport, the two automated shuttles "Valère" and "Tourbillon" start a new adventure in Uvrier. After having carried almost 54,000 passengers on the public road network in downtown Sion, the autonomous shuttles now run on-demand in the Uvrier district, with a connection to the SBB train station in St-Léonard, as part of a 6 months test-run. Since April 12th, residents and tourists are able to book for free the autonomous vehicles for their desired route via a dedicated mobile application or telephone. Mayor Philippe Varone is enthusiastic about the new operation: "The shuttles have proven themselves over the past few years. We are pleased that we can now take the next step in Uvrier and cover an entire residential area with an automated on-demand service with the shuttles.


Walmart Joins A Multibillion-Dollar Investment In Self-Driving Cars

International Business Times

Declaring "it's no longer a question of if...but when" autonomous vehicles are used in retail, President and CEO of Walmart (NYSE:WMT) U.S. John Furner announced the retail titan's intention to invest in General Motors' (NYSE:GM) Cruise self-driving car company in a press release today. Furner said the move will "aid our work toward developing a last mile delivery ecosystem that's fast, low-cost and scalable." The Walmart investment brings the total of Cruise's most recent funding round to $2.75 billion, though neither GM nor Cruise provides specifics on how much each individual company contributes to the whole, CNBC reports. Other investors in the subsidiary include GM itself, Microsoft, Honda Motor, and institutional investors. Among other projects, Cruise intends to roll out self-driving taxis in Dubai within the next two years.


Tesla settles with ex-employee over Autopilot code theft accusations

Engadget

Tesla has settled with a former employee that it sued for downloading data related to its Autopilot feature, Reuters has reported. Tesla filed the lawsuit against Cao Guangzhi back in 2019, accusing its former engineer of copying data to an iCloud account and taking it to his new employer, China's XMotors (owned by Xpeng). Cao reportedly made a monetary payment to Tesla as part of the terms of settlement, but the amount and other details were not disclosed. Cao's legal representative confirmed the settlement, saying he never provided Tesla information to XMotors or any other company. XMotors was not a party in the case, and said it developed its own self-driving technology in-house and respected intellectual property rights.


The Morning After: Touring Mercedes' very luxurious EV

Engadget

This "S-Class of EVs" is the first full-electric car from Mercedes to come to the US, combining a low drag coefficient with a large battery pack for a range of 478 miles, using Europe's WLTP estimate. Tesla, Porsche and Audi already have electric luxury sedans, but this looks like an interesting and extremely classy competitor. Roberto Baldwin is ready to walk us through the features and its futuristic interior, which includes a biometric sensor for logging in with voice or fingerprint. There's no word on how much it will cost, and we haven't taken it on the road yet, but I'm already digging its unique taillights and fastback hatch. It's barely been a month since DJI unveiled a new drone, and the company already has another to show.


Ocado in self-driving vans push with £10m stake in Oxbotica

BBC News

In its announcement, Ocado tempered expectations and said that getting permission from regulators to operate autonomous vehicles on public roads - allowing driverless deliveries to customers' homes - may take some time.


Walmart invests in GM-owned autonomous car startup Cruise

Engadget

Walmart is signaling its commitment to autonomous deliveries with a new investment in self-driving company Cruise. The two already have a cozy relationship, having recently worked together on a delivery pilot in Scottsdale, Arizona. Walmart was so impressed with Cruise's "differentiated business, unique tech and unmatched driverless testing" that it decided to take part in the GM subsidiary's $2.75 billion funding round. The investment will see Cruise become an important part of the retailer's "last mile delivery ecosystem" -- industry parlance for the final journey from warehouse to customer. Walmart has struck additional partnerships on driverless deliveries with companies including Google's Waymo, Ford and Udelv.


Ferrari's CEO promises an EV in 2025

Engadget

Ferrari has already made cars with hybrid powertrains, but during its Annual General Meeting this week, acting CEO John Elkann told investors in prepared remarks (PDF) that the carmaker will unveil "the first all-electric Ferrari" in 2025. Hopefully that plan will hold even after the company confirms a new CEO -- over the past decade execs have said Ferrari will never build an EV, will be the first with an electric supercar, or that an electric Ferrari will not arrive until after 2025. We are continuing to execute our electrification strategy in a highly disciplined way. And our interpretation and application of these technologies both in motor sport and in road cars is a huge opportunity to bring the uniqueness and passion of Ferrari to new generations. As you would expect, we have started by setting the bar high.


Autonomous-Truck Developer TuSimple Plans Driverless Road Test This Year

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

After opening at $40.25, the stock stumbled, slipping about 20%. But it regained much of its loss to close at $40. "I guess it was a rough awakening to life as a public company for a few hours, but we are optimistic," Chief Financial Officer Pat Dillon said. Top news and in-depth analysis on the world of logistics, from supply chain to transport and technology. Chief Executive Cheng Lu said the company is planning to conduct a "driver-out" pilot program without anyone at the wheel in the fourth quarter on a roughly 100-mile run between Tucson and Phoenix. The company has a fleet of 50 trucks it is testing in the U.S. Southwest and approximately 20 more in China, running with two people in the cab.


The Rise of Cyber-Attacks in the Automotive Industry

#artificialintelligence

Losses to the tune of billions are experienced due to the rise of cyber-attacks in the automotive industry, and they are becoming progressively worse as more auto manufacturers join the autonomy space. Industry experts argue that autonomy is the future of the automotive industry, mainly because driverless cars are safer, more comfortable, and more convenient than regular cars. However, there is a downside to this technology: susceptibility to cyber-attacks. Attacks range from physical to long-range digital attacks. As we know, a new cyber-attack vector is born every time new development occurs in the tech space.


First gate-to-gate autonomous airplane flight

ZDNet

A San Francisco-based company is claiming an aviation first with a gate-to-gate fully autonomous flight. You can see a video of the flight in the embed below. The company, Xwing, is setting out to introduce autonomous technology for regional air cargo, an overlooked space in the global race for autonomy but, with its sub-500 mile predictable routes and significant commercial importance, an intriguing entry point for autonomous air travel. Xwing is betting it can gain ground amid growing unmet logistics demand using its human-operated software stack that seamlessly integrates with existing aircraft to enable regional pilotless flight. "Over the past year, our team has made significant advancements in extending and refining our AutoFlight system to seamlessly integrate ground taxiing, take-offs, landings and flight operations, all supervised from our mission control center via redundant data links," says Marc Piette, CEO and founder of Xwing.