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The Age of Artificial Intelligence Is Here

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Artificial intelligence has long been thought of in terms similar to that of fusion power -- it's always 20 years away. Outside, it was a normal morning. Inside, looking out the window and barely noticing the chickadee, the business woman, a manager at a large call center downtown, waited for her morning coffee. It was a short wait. Her coffee maker knew that she woke at 5:30 a.m. It knew that because the alarm clock in the woman's bedroom sensed her movement and saved that information to the woman's Amazon Web Services (AWS) account. The coffee maker, also tied to that AWS account, took the hint and turned itself on. Ten minutes later, the shower came on in the bathroom. This also was noted by the house's systems and that data point was duly recorded by the woman's AWS account. That was the next cue for the coffee maker. It was plumbed directly into the house's water lines, and it opened the valve and filled itself with just the right amount of water to brew the coffee. It was brewing as the woman dressed, and five minutes after the woman appeared, the coffee was delivered to her by her Boston Dynamics personal assistant. She took a sip, just as the chickadee flew away. It was now 6:30 a.m., and time to leave for the office. Just like every other weekday, it would be a peaceful commute. As she left her apartment building and the door closed behind her, her ride was just pulling up to the curb.


Paul Pepper: Scott Christianson, Artificial Intelligence Specialist, "Face Recognition"

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University of Missouri assistant professor SCOTT CHRISTIANSON puts an app designed to assist those with visual impairments to the test using yours truly, our floor director and some wrinkled up dollar bills. Self-driving cars is becoming a reality, and while it may sound like a cool idea, PROF. SCOTT CHRISTIANSON points out a not-so-obvious morality dilemma when it comes to programming machines that are designed to make decisions that a human normally would, saying "hopefully the car will be able to avoid the accident, but there may be situations where it may not be able to, so how do we want those cars programmed?" Never mind tomorrow, machine-learning artificial intelligence is happening now! University of Missouri professor SCOTT CHRISTIANSON tells us just how much it's "creeping into our lives."


Simulation Testing's Uncanny Valley Problem - DZone IoT

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No one wants to be hurt because they're inadvertently driving next to an unproven self-driving vehicle. However, the costs of validating self-driving vehicles on the roads are extraordinary. To mitigate this, most autonomous developers test their systems in simulation, that is, in virtual environments. Starsky uses limited low-fidelity simulation to gauge the effects of certain system inputs on truck behavior. Simulation helps us to learn the proper force an actuator should exert on a steering mechanism, to achieve a turn of the desired radius.


Ford unveils two-legged robot that can walk packages to your door

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Self-driving delivery vehicles may be getting closer to becoming a reality, but Ford believes there's one leg of the process that could be further solved by robots. The auto giant has partnered with startup Agility Robotics to create a two-legged robot called'Digit' that can ferry packages to your doorstep. It solves a problem generated by self-driving delivery vehicles, which is that if there's no humans in the driver's seat that can drop off a package, autonomous robots can pick up the slack. 'It's not always convenient for people to leave their homes to retrieve deliveries or for businesses to run their own delivery services,' Ken Washington, chief technology officer at Ford, wrote in a blog post. 'If we can free people up to focus less on the logistics of making deliveries, they can turn their time and effort to things that really need their attention.


Ford's self-driving cars may have delivery robots because humans are too lazy

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines for May 22 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com Ford is developing self-driving delivery vehicles it plans to launch in 2021, but there's a problem. If there isn't a driver, who's going to bring the package or pizza to your door? In tests with faux-autonomous Domino's Pizza cars, Ford discovered that a lot of people were simply too lazy to make the trip to the curb to get their orders from the car themselves, so it came up with the obvious solution: robots.


Drones may soon come with 'spidey-senses' as tiny detectors pick up on vibrations

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Drones and self-driving cars may soon come with'spidey' senses. That's according to engineers in America, who believe the unmanned machines would benefit from sensory detectors similar to those often seen in arachinds. Specifically, they're referring the hairs on a spider's legs, which are linked to special neurons called mechanoreceptors, which flag-up danger through vibrations. If machines had similar characteristics, they'd be able to navigate more effectively in dangerous environments. Until now, sensor technology hasn't always been able to process data fast enough, or as smoothly, as nature.


The 50 Best Free Datasets for Machine Learning Lionbridge AI

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This article is also available in Japanese and Simplified Chinese. Lionbridge AI has assembled a wealth of resources for machine learning and natural language processing activities. In our previous articles, we explained why datasets are such an integral part of machine learning and natural language processing. Without training datasets, machine-learning algorithms would have no way of learning how to do text mining, text classification, or categorize products. This article is the ultimate list of open datasets for machine learning.


U.S. Postal Service Is Testing Self-Driving Trucks

NPR Technology

A mail carrier for the United States Postal Service makes deliveries at a Florida apartment complex in June 2018. The USPS has partnered with TuSimple to launch a multi-state driverless semi-truck test program on Tuesday. It doesn't involve home deliveries. A mail carrier for the United States Postal Service makes deliveries at a Florida apartment complex in June 2018. The USPS has partnered with TuSimple to launch a multi-state driverless semi-truck test program on Tuesday.


Postal Service to test autonomous semi trucks for hauling mail across state lines

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

The Postal Service is experimenting with self-driving long-haul semi trucks to transport mail between distribution centers. The U.S. Postal Service is testing its first long-haul self-driving delivery truck in a two-week pilot program that will use an autonomous tractor-trailer to deliver mail between distribution centers in Phoenix and Dallas. TuSimple, a self-driving truck company, is providing the vehicle and will have a safety engineer and driver in the cab to monitor its performance and take control if there are any issues, the company said in announcing the test Tuesday. The Postal Service has been exploring the idea for some time, recently soliciting bids to put semi-autonomous mail trucks on the road in a few years that allow a human to sort the mail while being autonomously driven along the route. "We are conducting research and testing as part of our efforts to operate a future class of vehicles which will incorporate new technology to accommodate a diverse mail mix, enhance safety, improve service, reduce emissions, and produce operational savings," said Postal Service spokeswoman Kim Frum.


How AI and analytics will transform the auto industry - THRIVE Europe

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The race to build fully autonomous cars has gone into hyper-drive, with major car-makers such as GM, Daimler, BMW and Audi promising SAE Level 5 autonomous driving by sometime in 2021. Goldman Sachs predicts that robo taxis will grow the ride-hailing and sharing business from $5 billion in revenue today to $285 billion by 2030. Autonomous driving will re-define mobility, and historic earning streams are sure to be toppled. Even with all the road testing the car-makers are doing, the only way the car companies can meet their ambitious goals is by leveraging the power of analytics and artificial intelligence (AI) to learn on real-world roads and accelerate development using simulations. The auto-makers are using simulation techniques such as hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) and software-in-the-loop (SIL) to make this happen.