Freight & Logistics Services


Using AI to Solve Complex Global Supply Chain Management Challenges

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Companies are starting to apply artificial intelligence across global supply chain management to improve efficiency, speed and decision-making in areas such as supply chain planning, warehouse automation, and logistics. The SCM World 2016 Future of Supply Chain Survey found that the importance of artificial intelligence has grown rapidly, with 47 percent of supply chain leaders believing the technology is disruptive to global supply chain management strategies.1 Market-research firm IDC predicts that by 2020, 50 percent of mature supply chains will use AI and advanced analytics for planning, and to eliminate sole reliance on short-term demand forecasts.2 Supply chain planning and optimization, including demand forecasting, are among the key areas where AI is already beginning to be deployed. And the volume of data continues to increase, in part due to the trend to connect supply chain management devices to the Internet, according to DHL's 2016 Logistics Trends Radar report.6 Accordingly, companies are already applying AI-based machine learning to automatically analyze vast amounts of supply-chain management data, identify trends, and generate predictive analytics -- the ability to predict problems and outcomes. "Software solutions are beginning to apply machine learning capabilities that can automatically detect errors and make course corrections, while processing real-time data streams," he says.


Will AI become a basic human right? Marc Benioff thinks it should

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The backdrop for Benioff's comments was debate around the impact of technology and innovation on the UN's 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Benioff cited recent comments made by Russian President Vladimir Putin to the effect that the country that controls mastery of AI can control the world. In San Francisco, we have taxis without taxi drivers, buses without bus drivers, trucks without truck drivers, cargo ships without crews. There was a wider sustainable development and innovation debate that went on, which we'll pick up on tomorrow, but the idea of AI as a basic human right is a very interesting topic in its own right.


Elon Musk: Tesla electric lorry to be unveiled in late October

The Guardian

The commercial trucking industry appears interested in Musk's proposed battery-powered heavy-duty vehicle, which can compete with conventional diesels and travel up to 1,000 miles on a single tank of fuel. Tesla's plans for new electric vehicles, including a commercial truck called the Tesla Semi, were announced last year, and in April Musk said the release of the semi-truck was set for September. In August, leaked correspondence with vehicle regulators revealed Tesla's plan to test long-haul, electric lorries that move in so-called platoons, or road-trains, that automatically follow a lead vehicle driven by a human. The Department for Transport announced last month that platoons of self-driving lorries will be trialled on England's motorways.


Tesla Semi Truck To Be Revealed On Oct. 26: 5 Expected Features

International Business Times

Musk called the upcoming vehicle a'beast' and'unreal,' so the upcoming vehicle is expected to compete with large rigs. Tesla has accommodated its battery in place of the regular engine in its cars, but the frame of a truck and its engine are designed differently and Tesla's design is expected to be interesting. But to compete with traditional long haul trucks, the Tesla Semi trucks will need to boost this range to 1,000 miles as regular long haul trucks have a range of 600-900 miles at least. But that brings up a quagmire -- the company will need a larger battery to provide the truck with an extended range, but if the battery is too big, it could actually interfere with the truck's weight carrying capacity.


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That's what Rolls-Royce is working on with their autonomous naval vessel concept that plans to have a 3,500 nautical-mile range. The company sees a future in the next 10 years or so where autonomous boats are out in the water for up to 100 days, eliminating the need for remote controlled ships or crews. Rolls-Royce general manager of naval electrics, automation and control, Benjamin Thorp said in a news release, "Such ships offer a way to deliver increased operational capability, reduce the risk to crew, and cut both operating and build costs." The ship is all conceptual, but the Verge reported a Norwegian company is launching an automated cargo ship next year that plans to be autonomous by 2020.


Autonomous vehicles and AI coming to disrupt logistics industry, says chief

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The global logistics industry is "unsophisticated" and due for a major shake-up, according to the boss of a cargo-handling giant. Mika Vehvilainen, chief executive of Finnish company Cargotec, expects autonomous vehicles and artificial intelligence to disrupt the market in coming years. "But it's also, from an operating cost point-of-view, clearly [beneficial] – about 40 per cent of port operating costs today in the Western world are labour costs. Meanwhile, the chief executive said his business had been negatively affected by the UK's Brexit vote last year.


autonomous-vehicles-and-artificial-intelligence-coming

#artificialintelligence

The global logistics industry is "unsophisticated" and due for a major shake-up, according to the boss of a cargo-handling giant. Mika Vehvilainen, chief executive of Finnish company Cargotec, expects autonomous vehicles and artificial intelligence to disrupt the market in coming years. "But it's also, from an operating cost point-of-view, clearly [beneficial] – about 40 per cent of port operating costs today in the Western world are labour costs. Meanwhile, the chief executive said his business had been negatively affected by the UK's Brexit vote last year.


Pot delivery by drone? California cannabis czars put the kibosh on stoner pipe dream

Los Angeles Times

California's Bureau of Cannabis Control last week outlined its plans to ban pot delivery by drone, putting the kibosh on any business hoping to make a buck on the concept. On Wednesday, the bureau released an initial study describing proposed emergency regulations for commercial cannabis businesses ahead of Jan. 1, when marijuana sales, with proper retail licensing, will be allowed for recreational use in California. In its study -- Commercial Cannabis Business Licensing Program Regulations -- the bureau is clear: Marijuana must be transported in trailers or commercial vehicles. The rule differs from federal drone regulations, which allow package delivery by drone as long as the device is within sight of the pilot, doesn't fly over people and the product weighs less than 55 pounds.


How Technology Is Bridging The Gaps In India's Fragmented Logistics Sector

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Through an automated promise-management system, Shipsy enables companies to plan processes and execute with ease. This issue led to the genesis of one of India's first truck logistics startup Shippr. Shippr's technology product suite, designed by a graduate of IIT-Delhi, helps truckers maximise delivery volumes in minimum time. This data is aggregated and fed into a centralized system that provides drivers optimal travel routes and estimated travel time.


The Red Cross just officially launched the first drone program for disasters

@machinelearnbot

The American Red Cross is preparing to utilize a drone for the first time as it takes stock of the damage done to Houston by Hurricane Harvey. Imagery supplied by the drone will help the organization determine which areas require the most aid. The images gathered by the drone will primarily be used to help the Red Cross as it works to help Houston residents that were affected by the hurricane get back on their feet. In the wake of a disaster like Hurricane Harvey, evaluating the aftermath is a top priority.