Catalog


How to stop Google Home or Amazon Echo from making unwanted online purchases

PCWorld

There's no denying that Google Home and Amazon Echo (or the less-expensive Echo Dot, if you're not using it for music) have changed the way we interact with our homes. If you want to start--or restart--making payments with voice commands, open the Google Home app, tap the menu button, and then tap on Payments. You can enable and disable ordering on Google Home via the Home app. Amazon's smart speakers are quickly becoming smart-home workhorses, but they could also be considered Trojan horses aimed at capturing more and more of your shopping dollars.Here's how to disable--and then re-enable--purchasing power with an Amazon Echo, Dot, Tap, or Show.


Finery wants to fix your wardrobe malfunction

Mashable

Finery, which is currently only for women (children's clothes are next, followed by men's clothing), gets to know you, your closet and clothing and style preferences by scanning through every online clothing purchase you've ever made. It also looks at other details included in the receipt emails like product images, which will help Finery pick up color, style, and other details. The site will use that information to recommend outfits, find clothing redundancies and help you return outfits you don't want. A September 2016 study found that 81% of surveyed online adults reported making an online purchase and a whopping 87% of those shoppers are willing to buy clothing online.


The role of machine learning in real-time fraud detection

#artificialintelligence

With the overall number of transactions rising hugely, and developments such as real-time payments helping make settlements faster, the solutions banks have in place for fraud detection are coming under more pressure than ever. As more people turn to digital solutions for all their everyday activities, including banking and making payments, they will generate huge amounts of data that forward-thinking banks can use to identify trends and highlight suspicious behavior. It was recently noted by CIO.com.au that PayPal, for instance, uses machine learning technology that studies users' purchase history. For example, if a system is put in place to flag up any payments over a certain amount for a more in-depth review, criminals will quickly learn to place transactions that come in just under this limit.