Music


Rise of AI-assisted art raises challenges notions of proprietary rights

The Japan Times

Artificial intelligence is finding its way into the world of music, literature and art, raising never-before-considered questions about a creators' role. A team of researchers from Nagoya University, led by engineering professor Satoshi Sato, caused a sensation in 2015 when a novel written by AI technology cleared the first round of a literary competition. The researchers first created a plot while the software wrote sentences based on it. The use of AI in creative endeavors, however, has raised questions about intellectual property.


How Deep Learning is Personalizing the Internet - Dataconomy

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It is quite possible that a large portion of the industries that currently leverage machine learning hold further unexploited potential for deep learning and DL-based approaches can trump current best practices in many of them. One typical approach to tackling this task is based on metadata (another typical data source is user interactions that fuel the Amazon-like "users who bought this item also bought…" logics). In practice, this means, that such a system could effectively make music recommendations based on solely the similarity of songs (an excellent feature for assembling personalized playlists). This is the first research paper that seeks to employ deep learning for session based recommendations and their results show their method significantly outperforms currently used state-of-the-art algorithms for this task.


New artificial intelligence robot can create its own music

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In a first, scientists have developed a marimba-playing robot that uses artificial intelligence to create its own music inspired by the works of musicians like Beethoven and Mozart. They worked with the robot named'Shimon' for seven years, enabling it to listen to music played by humans and improvise over pre-composed chord progressions. "This is a leap in Shimon's musical quality because it's using deep learning to create a more structured and coherent composition," said Gil Weinberg, a professor at Georgia Tech. "We want to explore whether robots could become musically creative and generate new music that we humans could find beautiful, inspiring and strange," Weinberg said.


Marimba playing robot can compose its own music

Daily Mail

The machine has used its artificial intelligence and deep learning algorithms to analyse more than two million motifs, riffs and licks of music to create its own masterpiece. Shimon (pictured) has used its artificial intelligence and deep learning algorithms to analyse over two million motifs, riffs and licks of music to create and perform its own masterpiece. For the first piece the machine has composed, Mr Bretan fed Shimon a melody comprised of eighth notes. In the first piece, Mr Bretan fed Shimon a melody comprised of eighth notes.


Real Musicians Evaluate Music Made by Artificial Intelligence

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A group of researchers at Kingston University and Queen Mary University of London are exploring the concept with AI that composes music. According to Dr. Oded Ben-Tal, lead researcher and senior lecturer in music technology at Kingston University, the results are impressive and can mark a new chapter in music, in which humans and machines collaborate in creating art. "In order to use machine learning methods to create useful models, we need lots of data," he said in an email to Motherboard, which he cowrote with his collaborator, Dr. Bob Sturm, digital media lecturer at Queen Mary University. "We are interested in making artificial systems that can augment human music creativity in helpful ways.


Robot uses deep learning and big data to write and play its own music

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He's worked with Shimon for seven years, enabling it to "listen" to music played by humans and improvise over pre-composed chord progressions. "Once Shimon learns the four measures we provide, it creates its own sequence of concepts and composes its own piece," said Bretan, who will receive his doctorate in music technology this summer at Georgia Tech. Shimon was created by Bretan's advisor, Gil Weinberg, director of Georgia Tech's Center for Music Technology. It received a sixteenth note melody the second time, which influenced it to generate faster note sequences.


Artificial Intelligence Could Compose The Music Of The Future

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Both Google and Sony have projects underway to advance how computers write music. The inherent issue with computers writing music, however, is trying to figure out what the math is for inspiration. Douglas Eck of Magenta, an offshoot of a Google Brain artificial intelligence project, says that many of the issues in figuring out how to enable computers to write music are human, rather than machine-based, and revolve around discovering the right questions to ask. Flow Machines are AI'musicians' that draw from a rich base of musical references, with which human musicians and composers can collaborate.


Watch: Robot composer performs its own work - Futurity

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You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4.0 International license. He's worked with Shimon for seven years, enabling it to "listen" to music played by humans and improvise over pre-composed chord progressions. "Once Shimon learns the four measures we provide, it creates its own sequence of concepts and composes its own piece," says Bretan, who will receive his doctorate in music technology this summer at the Georgia Institute of Technology. It received a sixteenth note melody the second time, which influenced it to generate faster note sequences.


This Artificially Intelligent Robot Composes and Performs Its Own Music

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To turn Shimon into an autonomous music-making machine, the researchers turned to artificial intelligence. Using deep learning, the bot studied a database of nearly 5,000 pre-existing songs, including compositions by Beethoven, the Beatles, Miles Davis, and Lady Gaga. The researchers say it's the first time a robot has used deep learning to create music. The bot is producing meaningful, original music largely without human intervention.


Robot Uses Deep Learning and Big Data to Write and Play its Own Music

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He's worked with Shimon for seven years, enabling it to "listen" to music played by humans and improvise over pre-composed chord progressions. "Once Shimon learns the four measures we provide, it creates its own sequence of concepts and composes its own piece," said Bretan, who will receive his doctorate in music technology this summer at Georgia Tech. Shimon was created by Bretan's advisor, Gil Weinberg, director of Georgia Tech's Center for Music Technology. Shimon has created two songs, using a database of nearly 5,000 songs, including works from Beethoven, Miles Davis and Lady Gaga.