Machinery


This company wants to 3D print rockets on the surface of Mars

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For a factory where robots toil around the clock to build a rocket with almost no human labour, the sound of grunts echoing across the parking lot make for a jarring contrast. "That's Keanu Reeves' stunt gym," says Tim Ellis, the chief executive and cofounder of Relativity Space, a startup that wants to combine 3D printing and artificial intelligence to do for the rocket what Henry Ford did for the automobile. As we walk among the robots occupying Relativity's factory, he points out the just-completed upper stage of the company's rocket, which will soon be shipped to Mississippi for its first tests. Across the way, he says, gesturing to the outside world, is a recording studio run by Snoop Dogg. Neither of those A-listers have paid a visit to Relativity's rocket factory, but the presence of these unlikely neighbours seems to underscore the company's main talking point: It can make rockets anywhere.


Advanced Manufacturing and Factory Automation White Papers ManufacturingTomorrow

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Here is a list of white papers. Please let us know if there is a white paper you would like to see that's not on the list. Just send us an email containing details about the white paper including Name, Publication Date, Contact Telephone, Email and URL if available. This 5G Americas' white paper explores Edge Computing's role in the evolution of 5G architecture, the application of Cloud-native principles such as software defined networking (SDN) and network function virtualization (NFV), and identifies various methodologies currently being adopted for 5G applications. It covers detailed emerging use cases and outlines the stringent requirements needed to facilitate advanced mobility, compute, storage capabilities for emerging 5G wireless networks.


Things I learned about Random Forest Machine Learning Algorithm

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On a meetup that I attended a couple of months ago in Sydney, I was introduced to an online machine learning course by fast.ai. I never paid any attention to it then. This week, while working on a Kaggle competition, and looking for ways to improve my score, I came across this course again. I decided to give it a try. Here is what I learned from the first lecture, which is a 1 hour 17 minutes video on INTRODUCTION TO RANDOM FOREST.


Universities Use AI Chatbots to Improve Student Services

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Universities are embracing artificial intelligence solutions to assist in IT projects and academics. At George Washington University, after piloting its 24/7 chatbot service MARTHA, 89 percent of users advocated the tool be a permanent tool. "We've created a service broker that can handle decisions on where to go to look for information," Jonathan Fozard, assistant vice president for the CIO's office at George Washington University told EdTech. "As we educated it and users tested it, the Watson component was learning alongside of us. If someone types in a question about 3D printing, we know that's most likely a student who has access to 3D printers in the engineering classroom or a medical enterprise."



Massive, AI-Powered Robots Are 3D-Printing Entire Rockets

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For a factory where robots toil around the clock to build a rocket with almost no human labor, the sound of grunts echoing across the parking lot make for a jarring contrast. "That's Keanu Reeves' stunt gym," says Tim Ellis, the chief executive and cofounder of Relativity Space, a startup that wants to combine 3D printing and artificial intelligence to do for the rocket what Henry Ford did for the automobile. As we walk among the robots occupying Relativity's factory, he points out the just-completed upper stage of the company's rocket, which will soon be shipped to Mississippi for its first tests. Across the way, he says, gesturing to the outside world, is a recording studio run by Snoop Dogg. Neither of those A-listers have paid a visit to Relativity's rocket factory, but the presence of these unlikely neighbors seems to underscore the company's main talking point: It can make rockets anywhere.


Giant robots powered by AI are being trained to 3-D print rockets to take humans to space

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A new company founded by two former USC students wants to change the way rockets are made by using enormous 3-D printers. The company's initial project is called Terran-1, a 100-foot tall rocket that initially will carry satellites of up to 2,800 pounds into orbit around the earth. The current plan is to radically simplify manufacturing, using 100 times fewer parts to create a rocket that's so easy to manufacture, an AI can handle it. Relativity Space is based in Los Angeles, where its working on building a rocket that could launch as early as 2021. Relativity's founders see 3-D printing as the key to the company's success.


Text Mining Machines Can Uncover Hidden Scientific Knowledge

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Berkeley Lab researchers Vahe Tshitoyan, Anubhav Jain, Leigh Weston, and John Dagdelen used machine learning to analyze 3.3 million abstracts from materials science papers. Sure, computers can be used to play grandmaster-level chess, but can they make scientific discoveries? Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have shown that an algorithm with no training in materials science can scan the text of millions of papers and uncover new scientific knowledge. A team led by Anubhav Jain, a scientist in Berkeley Lab's Energy Storage & Distributed Resources Division, collected 3.3 million abstracts of published materials science papers and fed them into an algorithm called Word2vec. By analyzing relationships between words the algorithm was able to predict discoveries of new thermoelectric materials years in advance and suggest as-yet unknown materials as candidates for thermoelectric materials.


Massive, AI-Powered Robots Are 3D-Printing Entire Rockets

#artificialintelligence

For a factory where robots toil around the clock to build a rocket with almost no human labor, the sound of grunts echoing across the parking lot make for a jarring contrast. "That's Keanu Reeves' stunt gym," says Tim Ellis, the chief executive and cofounder of Relativity Space, a startup that wants to combine 3D printing and artificial intelligence to do for the rocket what Henry Ford did for the automobile. As we walk among the robots occupying Relativity's factory, he points out the just-completed upper stage of the company's rocket, which will soon be shipped to Mississippi for its first tests. Across the way, he says, gesturing to the outside world, is a recording studio run by Snoop Dogg. Neither of those A-listers have paid a visit to Relativity's rocket factory, but the presence of these unlikely neighbors seems to underscore the company's main talking point: It can make rockets anywhere.


MIT launches digital content library for workforce learning on emerging technologies

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In the age of blockchains, 3D printing, CRISPR-Cas9 -- and the inevitable new technologies that are yet to emerge -- today's workforce is struggling to keep up with the latest developments. For large companies and executives, finding resources for workers to learn from that are current, reputable, and unbiased can be challenging. To address this unmet need, MIT has assembled a team of writers, educators, and subject matter experts from both academia and industry to power the Institute's newest online learning offering -- a digital content library designed to help organizations keep their workforces apprised of the latest developments in technology and science. Known as MIT Horizon, the platform contains bite-sized articles, videos, and podcasts on emerging technologies, with early topics including additive manufacturing, artificial intelligence, blockchain technology, and robotics. "Technologies are advancing very rapidly, and we feel a responsibility at MIT to provide learning opportunities that can help today's workforce keep up with this pace of innovation," says Sanjay Sarma, MIT vice president for open learning.