Rubik's Cube


Machine taught itself to solve Rubik's Cube without human help, UC Irvine researchers say

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Two algorithms, collectively called Deep Cube, typically can solve the 3-D combination puzzle within 30 moves, which is less than or equal to systems that use human knowledge, according to the research paper. Less than 5.8% of the world's population can solve the Rubik's Cube, according to the Rubik's website.


UC Irvine Deep Learning Machine Teaches Itself To Solve A Rubik's Cube

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Anyone who has lived through the 1980s knows how maddeningly difficult it is to solve a Rubik's Cube, and to accomplish the feat without peeling the stickers off and rearranging them. Apparently the six-sided contraption presents a special kind of challenge to modern deep learning techniques that makes it more difficult than, say, learning to play chess or Go. That used to be the case, anyway. Researchers from the University of California, Irvine, have developed a new deep learning technique that can teach itself to solve the Rubik's Cube. What they come up with is very different than an algorithm designed to solve the toy from any position.


Self-Taught AI Masters Rubik's Cube in Just 44 Hours

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Incredibly, the system learned to dominate the classic 3D puzzle in just 44 hours and without any human intervention. "A generally intelligent agent must be able to teach itself how to solve problems in complex domains with minimal human supervision," write the authors of the new paper, published online at the arXiv preprint server. Indeed, if we're ever going to achieve a general, human-like machine intelligence, we'll have to develop systems that can learn and then apply those learnings to real-world applications. Recent breakthroughs in machine learning have produced systems that, without any prior knowledge, have learned to master games like chess and Go. But these approaches haven't translated very well to the Rubik's Cube.


Machines can now finish the Rubik's Cube without human help

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OK, let's break this down. The Rubik's Cube is pretty difficult, right? But you'd imagine it might be pretty easy for an artificial intelligence to break down and solve consistently, right? Creating an algorithm that can solve the Rubik's Cube is relatively simple -- the kind of algorithms that allow AI to beat humans at chess or Go or even DOTA 2! But creating a machine that can solve the Rubik's Cube without algorithms hand-crafted by human beings? Stephen McAleer and his colleagues at the University of California think they have solved the problem, with a process called "autodidactic iteration".


Machine Learning Can Solve Rubik's Cubes Now

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Deep-learning machines have figured out how to master games like chess or Mortal Kombat. Now, computer scientists at the University of California, Irvine taken things to the third dimension by creating an algorithm that can figure out how to solve a Rubik's Cube, a surprisingly difficult change. "Our algorithm is able to solve 100 percent of randomly scrambled cubes while achieving a median solve length of 30 moves - less than or equal to solvers that employ human domain knowledge," say the scientists in the abstract to their paper, up on Arvix. The algorithm, called DeepCube, uses what's known as "autodidactic iteration," a form of machine learning developed by the authors of the paper. The big challenge of autodidactic iteration was to allow machines to find their own rewards in solving a puzzle, a goal they can reach.


A machine has figured out Rubik's Cube all by itself

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The Rubik's Cube is a three-dimensional puzzle developed in 1974 by the Hungarian inventor Erno Rubik, the object being to align all squares of the same color on the same face of the cube. It became an international best-selling toy and sold over 350 million units. The puzzle has also attracted considerable interest from computer scientists and mathematicians. One question that has intrigued them is the smallest number of moves needed to solve it from any position. The answer, proved in 2014, turns out to be 26.


A machine has figured out Rubik's Cube all by itself

#artificialintelligence

The Rubik's Cube is a three-dimensional puzzle developed in 1974 by the Hungarian inventor Erno Rubik, the object being to align all squares of the same color on the same face of the cube. It became an international best-selling toy and sold over 350 million units. The puzzle has also attracted considerable interest from computer scientists and mathematicians. One question that has intrigued them is the smallest number of moves needed to solve it from any position. The answer, proved in 2014, turns out to be 26.


Machine Learning Finally Tackles the Rubik's Cube

#artificialintelligence

Deep-learning machines have figured out how to master games like chess or Mortal Kombat. Now, computer scientists at the University of California, Irvine taken things to the third dimension by creating an algorithm that can figure out how to solve a Rubik's Cube, a surprisingly difficult change. "Our algorithm is able to solve 100 percent of randomly scrambled cubes while achieving a median solve length of 30 moves -- less than or equal to solvers that employ human domain knowledge," say the scientists in the abstract to their paper, up on Arvix. The algorithm, called DeepCube, uses what's known as "autodidactic iteration," a form of machine learning developed by the authors of the paper. The big challenge of autodidactic iteration was to allow machines to find their own rewards in solving a puzzle, a goal they can reach.


Watch a guy named Feliks Zemdegs solve a Rubik's Cube in 4.22 seconds

Mashable

Most of us can't solve a Rubik's Cube to save a life, let alone finish the puzzle in seconds. Australian speedcuber Feliks Zemdegs certainly makes it look easy, especially when he broke the Rubik's Cube world record (again) at the Cube for Cambodia competition in Melbourne, Australia on Sunday. Zemdegs, who had previously held the world record, managed to solve a Rubik's Cube at a frighteningly quick 4.22 seconds, beating a record of 4.59 which was both held by Feliks and South Korea's SeungBeom Cho. Correction: A previous version of this article stated that Patrick Ponce was the previous record holder, when it was both Feliks and Cho who simultaneously held the record. 'Arrested Development' Season 5 trailer is here and we can taste the happy'Luke Cage' Season 2 trailer introduces quite the villain YouTuber takes the music out of Justin Timberlake's'Can't Stop the Feeling' video, and it's pretty weird


Speedcuber, 22, breaks world record by solving Rubik's cube in just 4.22 seconds

Daily Mail

An Australian man has set a new world record for fastest time to solve a Rubik's cube at just 4.22 seconds. Feliks Zemdegs is a 22-year-old'speedcuber' from Australia who participated in the Cube for Cambodia 2018 event on Saturday in Melbourne. He broke the previous world record of 4.59 seconds by solving a 3x3x3 cube in just 4.22 seconds. Feliks Zemdegs set a world record for fastest time to solve a Rubik's cube at just 4.22 seconds The 22-year-old from Australia broke the previous record at the Cube for Cambodia 2018 event on Saturday in Melbourne. A video captured his record-breaking performance as he sat alongside other speedcubers of all ages.