Environmental Law


Artificial Intelligence Has a Huge Carbon Footprint. But It Doesn't Have To.

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This piece has been published as part of Slate's partnership with Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 250 news outlets to strengthen coverage of the climate story. Artificial intelligence is getting smarter, but it isn't getting cleaner. In order to improve at predicting the weather, sorting your social media feeds, and hailing your Uber, it needs to train on massive datasets. A few years ago, an A.I. system might have required millions of words to attempt to learn a language, but today that same system could be processing 40 billion words as it trains, according to Roy Schwartz, who researches deep learning models at the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence and in the University of Washington's computer science and engineering department. All that processing takes a lot of energy.


Want to cut greenhouse gas emissions? Look to digital technologies

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Tackling climate change is one of the greatest challenges facing humanity. Over the next decade, the technologies of the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR) – particularly 5G, the Internet of Things (IoT) and artificial intelligence (AI) – will provide essential tools for increasing efficiency in the economy and preparing for a post-fossil fuel society. Last year, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change delivered its special report on the effects of global warming of 1.5 C and above. The report clearly lays out the difference between 1.5 C and 2 C warming and emphasizes the urgent need to avoid crossing tipping points in Earth's life support systems. To give us a chance to limit global warming to this level, global greenhouse gas emissions must peak by 2020 and then fall by half every decade, corresponding to 7% annual reductions as a global average.


Want to cut greenhouse gas emissions? Look to digital technologies

#artificialintelligence

Tackling climate change is one of the greatest challenges facing humanity. Over the next decade, the technologies of the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR) – particularly 5G, the Internet of Things (IoT) and artificial intelligence (AI) – will provide essential tools for increasing efficiency in the economy and preparing for a post-fossil fuel society. Last year, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change delivered its special report on the effects of global warming of 1.5 C and above. The report clearly lays out the difference between 1.5 C and 2 C warming and emphasizes the urgent need to avoid crossing tipping points in Earth's life support systems. To give us a chance to limit global warming to this level, global greenhouse gas emissions must peak by 2020 and then fall by half every decade, corresponding to 7% annual reductions as a global average.


To decarbonize we must decomputerize: why we need a Luddite revolution

The Guardian

Our built environment is becoming one big computer. "Smartness" is coming to saturate our stores, workplaces, homes, cities. As we go about our daily lives, data is made, stored, analyzed and used to make algorithmic inferences about us that in turn structure our experience of the world. Computation encircles us as a layer, dense and interconnected. If our parents and our grandparents lived with computers, we live inside of them.


John Platt Keynote talk: AI for Climate Change: the context

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Many in the machine learning community wish to take action on climate change, yet feel their skills are inapplicable. This workshop aims to show that in fact the opposite is true: while no silver bullet, ML can be an invaluable tool both in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and in helping society adapt to the effects of climate change. Climate change is a complex problem, for which action takes many forms - from designing smart electrical grids to tracking deforestation in satellite imagery. Many of these actions represent high-impact opportunities for real-world change, as well as being interesting problems for ML research.


How Artificial Intelligence can help address climate change Packt Hub

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"I don't want you to be hopeful. I want you to panic. I want you to feel the fear I feel every day. And then I want you to act on changing the climate"– Greta Thunberg Greta Thunberg is a 16-year-old Swedish schoolgirl, who is famously called as a climate change warrior. She has started an international youth movement against climate change and has been nominated as a candidate for the Nobel Peace Prize 2019 for climate activism. According to a recent report by the Intergovernmental Panel (IPCC), climate change is seen as the top global threat by many countries.


Artificial Intelligence, an ally against climate change

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Greta Thunberg is 16 and lives in Sweden. Until February last year, she was just another student concerned about the environment. Today, she's become the world's most influential climate activists, after founding'Fridays for Future', a movement that encourages school students to take time off from class to participate in demonstrations against their countries' governments for breaching environmental laws. Greta believes that we're heading towards a natural disaster and the planet's destruction if we fail to change our habits as a society. And that includes everyone, from large industries to the individual citizen.


WattTime, Carbon Tracker, and Google Team Up to Measure Global Power Plant Emissions - The Planetary Press

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On May 7th, WattTime announced a new project in collaboration with Carbon Tracker, Google, and the World Resources Institute (WRI). The project will quantify carbon emissions from all of the world's largest power plants by utilizing AI technology. Data collected will be made available in a public database. The data is intended to hold the polluting plants accountable to environmental standards and enable advanced new emissions reduction technologies. But through the growing power of AI, our little coalition of nonprofits is about to lift that veil all over the world, all at once," said Gavin McCormick, Executive Director of WattTime. "To think that today a little team like ours can use emerging AI remote sensing techniques to hold every powerful polluter worldwide accountable is pretty incredible.


Horizon Magazine (@HorizonMagEU)

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If you have a story for Horizon, please email us at: editorial@horizon-magazine.eu Are you sure you want to view these Tweets? Is #AI a double-edged sword when it comes to fighting #climatechange? We need to assess the environmental impact of #AI – both good and bad – say experts. Water, fertilisers, soil: just a few of the resources we need to manage better to take care of Europe's land say experts http://bit.ly/Land-use


XAG Urged Rural Development to Go Green at Fortune's Global Sustainability Forum

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XAG has been invited to attend the inaugural Fortune Global Sustainability Forum, held from September 4-6 in China's Yunnan Province, to explore cutting-edge thinking and innovative solutions for the growing environmental problems. This three-day summit has convened senior leaders from Fortune 500 companies, government, NGOs, academia and other pioneering business to forge new environmental consensus through the convergence of energy, technology and sustainability. Guest speakers included Tony Fadell, Principal of Future Shape, Pat Brown, Founder and CEO of Impossible Foods Inc, Jim Fitterling, CEO of Dow Chemical, Clay Chandler, Executive Director and Asia Editor of Fortune, Cristiana Paşca Palmer, Assistant Secretary General of the United Nations, etc. As a representative of agriculture technology company and the only drone maker at this year's forum, XAG, together with Nature Conservancy, CreditEase, WildChina and Yunnan Poverty Alleviation Office, presented key insights that falls under the sub-theme Rural Development and the Environment. Speaking at the forum, Justin Gong, Co-founder and Vice President of XAG, has informed the world of an upcoming paradigm shift in agriculture.