Software


Fueling Your Machine Learning Investment for Success

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The rush to adopt machine learning practices has become ubiquitous in every industry. Enterprise data scientists want their AI models to be deployed into production to propel their organizations forward. Meanwhile, IT is looking for ways to enable their data scientists to build, train, and deploy their models in a way that does not compromise the security of their organizations, while making efficient use of resources like costly GPU clusters. Anaconda, the creator of Conda, has adopted Kubernetes as the standard for building and deploying ML models at speed and scale in Anaconda Enterprise. Elizabeth Winkler has devoted her career to building SaaS products that leverage natural language processing and machine learning to extract meaning out of massive amounts of data.


Messaging as a Platform: The State of Human to Machine Communications

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Conversational user experiences, in the form of chatbots and voice interfaces, are overtaking many of the traditional ways in which we interact with machines. Since the rise of computers, human-machine interfaces typically had some form of Graphical User Interface (GUI) which enabled direct (if limited) interaction with devices and their programs, for instance via software installs, mobile apps, and web-based applications such as Software as a Service (SaaS). No matter how "beautiful" the respective interface, this GUI is now more and more replaced by a Conversational User Interface (CUI). Other still evolving interface styles are less text- and voice-driven, and therefore limit the messaging element to certain basic functions such as taking photos with the blink of an eye (smart glasses or smart cameras such as Blincam can do that today) but will eventually allow for richer interaction gestures (see project Soli). When coupled with an input-output feedback loop, so-called bionic lenses also hold a promising future.


A new smartphone app will let people identify mysterious drones flying overhead

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The world's largest drone manufacturer has announced plans for a new smartphone app that lets users identify mysterious drones flying around their neighborhood. Developed by DJI, the Shenzhen based drone giant, the unnamed app is targeted for a release in early 2020 pending approval by government regulators. The app will have a range of around .6 miles using WiFi Aware, a new communication protocol that allows WiFi-enabled devices to communicate with one another. DJI announced the new app at the United Nations-sponsored Drone Enable conference in Montreal this week. 'We've created a remote identification solution that works with what people already have,' DJI's Brendan Schulman told Reuters.


App developers in Uganda use TensorFlow to spot armyworm damage in maize

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Fall armyworm, the larval life stage of a fall armyworm moth, impacts maize crops worldwide but particularly in countries like Uganda, where agricultural businesses employ 70% of the population. Studies show the potential impact is between 8.3 and 20.6 million tons per year, with the fallout amounting to between $2.48 million and $6.19 million per year. The threat of devastating losses prompted developers participating in a Google Developer Group in Mbale to create an Android app -- FlatButter -- that identifies signs of fall armyworm damage in maize crops. It's been featured on a national TV station in Uganda and highlighted by the Food Agricultural Organization of the United Nations, as well as by Google in a short film published today. "The vast damage and yield losses in maize production, due to FAW, got the attention of global organizations, who are calling for innovators to help," wrote Hansu Mobile and Intelligent Innovations CEO Nsubuga Hassan, who led the team that developed the app.


The Future Of Retail: Autonomous Drivers, Conscious Consumers And AI-Powered Everything

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Between delivery bots, interactive screens and voice shopping, the retail landscape has no boundaries for innovation. While some of the trends we're seeing now will prove to be just trends, others will change the way consumers shop and push brands to radically rethink their customer experience. As 2019 comes to a close, it's critical to reflect on changing customer expectations as well as industry leaders who are raising the bar for everyone in the retail space. As the chief marketing officer of a software as a service (SaaS) platform for e-commerce product data, I've come across some leading trends that are likely to stick. For any marketer in the retail space, it's important to consider what these trends may mean.


The Next Chapter of Digital: How to Scale AI Across Your Business

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This blog post has been contributed to the Salesforce Blog by one of our Dreamforce '19 Innovator sponsors. Technology is at an inflection point. In this next chapter of digital transformation, companies must reinvent their entire business with data to create a more personal and relevant customer experience. Yet while today's companies are awash with data, unlocking its value requires them to change how they operate and make decisions. That's where artificial intelligence (AI) comes in.


Windows 10: Why it's finally time to upgrade from Windows 7

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The revamped, customizable Start menu on Windows 10. The end is near for Windows 7 users: After 10 years, Microsoft will stop supporting the OS on Jan. 14, 2020, which means it's time to upgrade to Windows 10 to keep your PC running smoothly and securely. Some users have been hesitant to make the switch, as the rollout of Windows 10 saw several issues, including a series of bugs that led Microsoft to pull its October 2018 Update days after its release. In April, however, Microsoft laid out several changes to its update approach starting with the May 2019 release, including slower rollouts with additional testing, more options for pausing updates and more disclosure of known issues. Many of the issues are due to the fact that updates are happening more frequently, said Gartner Research analyst Steve Kleynhans.


How to harness emerging technology for small-business success

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Recent advances have been numerous and head-spinning, sometimes making it hard to keep up. The truth is, harnessing emerging technologies effectively may be exactly what takes your business to the next level, ensuring success in today's rapidly evolving, competitive business landscape. If you aren't using one of these emerging technologies in your business yet, it's likely that your business would benefit from doing so in the near future. How can you leverage technological advances to help your SMB be more innovative and competitive? Here are trends affecting small businesses to watch when evaluating what technologies to adopt.


How to harness emerging technology for small-business success

#artificialintelligence

Recent advances have been numerous and head-spinning, sometimes making it hard to keep up. The truth is, harnessing emerging technologies effectively may be exactly what takes your business to the next level, ensuring success in today's rapidly evolving, competitive business landscape. If you aren't using one of these emerging technologies in your business yet, it's likely that your business would benefit from doing so in the near future. How can you leverage technological advances to help your SMB be more innovative and competitive? Here are trends affecting small businesses to watch when evaluating what technologies to adopt.


Microsoft has entered the RPA market -- what does that mean?

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Microsoft officially entered the robotic process automation (RPA) marketplace this week with some major changes to its Power Platform. It's not the first incumbent enterprise software vendors to feel the need to have a product in this category (SAP purchased French RPA vendor Contextor late last year), and it won't be the last. We should expect to see a steady increase in RPA investment in from big enterprise vendors, with a mix of internally developed and acquired technologies. The fundamental challenge driving these investments is that RPA is the first step in a journey to reinvent how companies build the software they use to run their businesses (see my recent article on how UIPath is reinventing the RPA category). RPA lets companies record a series of computer-based processes done by a human so that the series can then be repeated automatically without human involvement.