Neurology


Electronic conversations between neurons could soon be recorded precisely

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Electrodes are used to pick up electrical signals. Neurons however are tiny units of the nervous system and it is difficult to create an electrode small enough to record all the workings of a neurons. Researchers from Harvard University have overcome this obstacle by creating an electronic chip that could be implanted within these networks and could thus perform highly sensitive intracellular recordings of the neurons individually. This could be a boon for neuronal research believes the team as it could help provide an in-depth knowledge of the neuronal connections and synaptic workings. The team wrote, "Current electrophysiological or optical techniques cannot reliably perform simultaneous intracellular recordings from more than a few tens of neurons."


A Mind-reading exoskeleton lets a completely paralyzed man walk

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With so much debate around the ethical use of technology, news like this certainly provides hope for the future. I personally believe technology will provide the biggest breakthroughs in the Healthcare industry and this is just another example of that happening. A 30-year-old Frenchman named Thibault, who was paralyzed from the shoulders down was able to walk in the controlled environment of a lab in an exoskeleton suit. For someone who hasn't been able to walk for the four two years due to a spinal injury, imagine the emotions he must have gone through when he took that first small step. Earlier, I had written about a couple of other mind-reading devices already in the making.


The Society for Neuroscience (SfN) on Twitter

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Fei-Fei Li of @StanfordHAI challenges us to use technology to serve humanity at its broadest and most diverse extent. Join her at #SfN19 for "Dialogues Between Neuroscience and Society" to hear of the potential that AI & #MachineLearning pose for society.


Machine Learning Algorithm Helps Doctors Make Decisions in Stroke Management - Docwire News

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Researchers from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) have recently created a machine learning algorithm that can help physicians in deciding how to treat a patient's stroke. The artificial intelligence (AI) driven technology is designed to assist doctors outside of major stroke treatment facilities in determining whether an ischemic stroke patient would benefit from undergoing an endovascular procedure that removes the blood clot. Their work was published online on September 24 in the journal Stroke. This procedure, endovascular thrombectomy, is performed to remove an arterial blood clot causing an ischemic stroke. It involves the insertion of a catheter into the femoral artery of the thigh, which is followed to the patient's brain where the clot must be removed.


AI Detects Brain Cancer from a Blood Test

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Imagine being able to know the probability of whether a persistent headache that you are experiencing is a symptom of something much worse through a simple blood test. Researchers affiliated with ClinSpec Diagnostics Limited, a spin-off from the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland, and their colleagues developed patented technology that can detect brain cancer from a blood samples. Using an innovative combination of artificial intelligence (AI) and spectroscopy, the U.K. researchers developed a method to detect brain cancer from a blood biopsy, and published their study on October 8, 2019 in Nature Communications. Headaches are one of the most common symptoms of brain tumors, according to the American Brain Tumor Association. But while headaches are very common, brain cancer is not.


BrainCheck: Helping Physicians Care for Dementia Patients

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Used in over 200 clinical practices around the world, BrainCheck is helping doctors, caregivers and dementia patients work together to lessen the toll of the degenerative disease. Founded in 2015, the enterprise tech company uses interactive cognitive assessment and care management technology to make caring for dementia patients easier for all involved. "To date, more than 100,000 individuals are using BrainCheck to monitor their cognitive health, and this is only the beginning," David Eagleman, co-founder and chief science officer of BrainCheck, said in a statement. "We're providing a platform for patients, caregivers, and physicians to work together to manage one of the biggest public health crises of our time." BrainCheck uses tests administered from an iPhone, iPad or desktop computer to interpret a patient's current level of cognitive functioning to develop a customised treatment plan.



Artificial Intelligence may help Paralyzed Patients Regain Movement

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Intel and Brown University tied up to restore the patient's movement with the help of Artificial Intelligence. Brown University plans to develop an "intelligent spinal interface" to restore limb movement and bladder control for people with Spinal cord injuries that cause paralysis. Brain's electrical commands cannot reach to the muscles once severe spinal injury occurs. According to the announcement, there are 291,000 people with spinal cord injuries in the United States as per the National Spinal Cord Injury Statistical Center estimates. Executive Opinions Intel corporate Vice President and General Manager of the AI Products Group, Naveen Rao, said, "As a Ph.D. student at Brown, I investigated how to interface the brain with machines as an application. Now at Intel, we're combining our AI expertise with Brown University's cutting-edge medical research to help solve a critical medical problem: how to reconnect the brain and spine after a major spinal injury."


Intel and Brown University research will use AI to treat spinal cord injuries - SiliconANGLE

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Researchers from Brown University and Intel Corp. are working together to develop new artificial intelligence-based technologies aimed at helping victims of spinal injuries walk again. When someone suffers an injury to the spinal cord, the electrical signals from the brain can no longer pass to the muscles, which leads to paralysis. Such injuries are devastating because the human body cannot regenerate severed nerve fibers by itself. But medical professionals believe that AI technologies could help some victims to regain control of their muscles. Now, backed by a $6.3 million grant from the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the researchers from Brown University and Intel are embarking on a two-year effort to create those technologies.