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Infections and Infectious Diseases


A.I. Is Not Going to Magically Deliver a Coronavirus Vaccine

#artificialintelligence

In late February, a paper appeared in the journal Cell with encouraging news regarding one of the world's most persistent public health problems. Researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University had used artificial intelligence to identify a chemical compound with powerful antibiotic properties against some of the world's most drug-resistant strains of bacteria -- a welcome discovery in a world where 700,000 people die every year from drug-resistant infections. It was the first time an antibacterial compound had been identified this way. The researchers named it halicin, in honor of the computer HAL in the film 2001: Space Odyssey. While the global need for new antibiotics to treat drug-resistant infections is as pressing as it was at the start of the year, the world's attention has been diverted by the novel coronavirus pandemic, and the hunt for a vaccine that can halt Covid's spread.


COVID-19 Vaccine Development: Know How Machine Learning Can Assist

#artificialintelligence

Several deadly viral outbreaks have happened in every part of the world, making all the nations race for a vaccine development every time. Similarly, COVID-19 or the novel coronavirus demands numerous research teams to find a vaccine to fight against this lethal virus. Wonder how machine learning contributes? Advanced technology is the greatest strength that researchers have in this digital era as it gathers data from all resources and offers useful insights. It's not just the biological researchers who work for vaccine development.


Top hacks from Black Hat and DEF CON 2020

#artificialintelligence

We take a closer looking at some of the more unusual security research that was presented at this year's virtual Hacker Summer Camp The annual Hacker Summer Camp traversed from Las Vegas into the wilds of cyberspace this year, thanks to the coronavirus pandemic, but security researchers still rose to the challenge of maintaining the traditions of the event in 2020. As well as tackling core enterprise and web security threats, presenters at both Black Hat and DEF CON 2020 took hacking to weird and wonderful places. Anything with a computer inside was a target – a definition that these days includes cars, ATMs, medical devices, traffic lights, voting systems and much, much more. Security researcher Alan Michaels brought a new meaning to the phrase "insider threat" with a talk about the potential risk posed by implanted medical devices in secure spaces at Black Hat 2020. An aging national security workforce combined with the burgeoning, emerging market for medical devices means that the risk is far from theoretical.


Digital technologies in the public-health response to COVID-19

#artificialintelligence

Digital technologies are being harnessed to support the public-health response to COVID-19 worldwide, including population surveillance, case identification, contact tracing and evaluation of interventions on the basis of mobility data and communication with the public. These rapid responses leverage billions of mobile phones, large online datasets, connected devices, relatively low-cost computing resources and advances in machine learning and natural language processing. This Review aims to capture the breadth of digital innovations for the public-health response to COVID-19 worldwide and their limitations, and barriers to their implementation, including legal, ethical and privacy barriers, as well as organizational and workforce barriers. The future of public health is likely to become increasingly digital, and we review the need for the alignment of international strategies for the regulation, evaluation and use of digital technologies to strengthen pandemic management, and future preparedness for COVID-19 and other infectious diseases. The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in an accelerated development of applications for digital health, including symptom monitoring and contact tracing. Their potential is wide ranging and must be integrated into conventional approaches to public health for best effect.


The costs and benefits of artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

New York – The robots are no longer coming; they are here. The COVID-19 pandemic is hastening the spread of artificial intelligence, but few have fully considered the short- and long-run consequences. In thinking about AI, it is natural to start from the perspective of welfare economics -- productivity and distribution. What are the economic effects of robots that can replicate human labor? Such concerns are not new.


Artificial Intelligence In Energy Market COVID -19 Impact

#artificialintelligence

Artificial Intelligence In Energy Market 2020 research provides a detailed information of the industry including classifications, applications and industry chain structure. The Global Artificial Intelligence In Energy Industry analysis is provided for the international markets including development trends, competitive landscape analysis, and key regions development status. Development policies and plans are discussed as well as manufacturing processes and cost structures are also analyzed. SWOT analysis has been used to understand the Thus, helping the companies to understand the threats and challenges in front of the businesses. Artificial Intelligence In Energy Market is showing steady growth and CAGR is expected to improve during the forecast period.


Government paid Vote Leave AI firm to analyse UK citizens' tweets

The Guardian

Privacy campaigners have expressed alarm after the government revealed it had hired an artificial intelligence firm to collect and analyse the tweets of UK citizens as part of a coronavirus-related contract. Faculty, which was hired by Dominic Cummings to work for the Vote Leave campaign and counts two current and former Conservative ministers among its shareholders, was paid £400,000 by the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government for the work, according to a copy of the contract published online. In June the Guardian reported Faculty had been awarded the contract, but that key passages in the published version of the document describing the work that the company would carry out had been redacted. In response to questions about the contract in the House of Lords, the government published an unredacted version of the contract, which describes the company's work as "topic analysis of social media to understand public perception and emerging issues of concern to HMG arising from the Covid-19 crisis". A further paragraph describes how machine learning will be applied to social media data.


Mass General using AI to analyze lung damage from COVID-19

#artificialintelligence

Advances in AI and Machine Learning are adding an unprecedented level of intelligence to everything through capabilities such as speech …


Clean.io raises $5M to continue its battle against malicious adtech -- #ArtificialIntelligence #StartUp #iot #robotics #AI

#artificialintelligence

Clean.io, a startup that helps digital publishers protect themselves from malicious ads, recently announced that it has raised $5 million in Series A funding. The Baltimore-based company isn't the only organization promising to fight malvertising (such as ads that force visitors to redirect to another website). But as co-founder wrote Seth Demsey told me last year, Clean.io CEO Matt Gillis told me via email this week that the challenge will "always" be evolving." "Just like an antivirus company needs to constantly be updating their definitions and improving their protections, we always need to be alert to the fact that bad actors will constantly try to evade detection and get over and around the walls that you put in front of them," Gillis wrote. The company says its technology is now used on more than 7 million websites for customers including WarnerMedia's Xandr (formerly AppNexus), The Boston Globe and Imgur. Clean.io has now raised a total of $7.5 million. The Series A was led by Tribeca Venture Partners, with participation from Real Ventures, Inner Loop Capital, and Grit Capital Partners. Gillis said he'd initially planned to fundraise at the end of February, but he had to put those plans on hold due to COVID-19. He ended up doing all his pitching via Zoom ("I saw more than my fair share of small NY apartments") and he praised Tribeca's Chip Meakem (who previous investments include AppNexus) as "a world class partner." Of course, the pandemic's impact on digital advertising goes far beyond pausing Gillis' fundraising process. And when it comes to malicious ads, he said that with the cost of digital advertising declining precipitously in late March, "bad actors capitalized on this opportunity." "We saw a pretty constant surge in threat levels from mid-March until early May," Gillis continued. "Demand for our solutions have remained strong due to the increased level of attacks brought on by the pandemic.


How China Controlled the Coronavirus

The New Yorker

Afew days before my return to classroom teaching at Sichuan University, I was biking across a deserted stretch of campus when I encountered a robot. The blocky machine stood about chest-high, on four wheels, not quite as long as a golf cart. In front was a T-shaped device that appeared to be some kind of sensor. The robot rolled past me, its electric motor humming. I turned around and tailed the thing at a distance of fifteen feet.