Consumer Health


New artificial intelligence can see the age of your CELLS

Daily Mail

Artificial intelligence could help people live longer by detecting your internal age and designed a tailor-made medical regime, according to new research. Scientists developed a'simple and cheap' computer algorithm that can calculate people's biological age, and reveal whether certain lifestyle changes and medical products could increase the chance of living a long and healthy life. The formula, called Aging.AI, has provided accurate results for 130,000 individuals based on their blood samples. New research, led by the AI company Insilico Medicine, says artificial intelligence could determine a person's risk of developing age-related diseases like cancer and heart disease. Scientists created a formula that can calculate a person's risk of developing age-related diseases, and give medical advice based on those risks'The artificial intelligence is just as good at predicting your age as if you looked at a picture of the person and had to guess the person's age,' said Dr Morten Scheibye-Knudsen, a professor at University of Copenhagen's Center for Healthy Aging.


eCommerce Company uses Artificial Intelligence to Improve their Value Chain Logistics Viewpoints

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One of the hottest areas for subscription services right now are ingredient and meal-kit delivery services. Two of the companies in this space – Blue Apron and Plated – were both in the news. Blue Apron went public last year, raising $300 million in the process, and Plated was acquired by the grocery chain Albertsons. These companies make weekly deliveries of pre-measured ingredients with recipes and instructions on how to put the meal together. These meal-kit services have distinctive supply chains and difficult forecasting issues.


HelloFresh: Senior Data Scientist

@machinelearnbot

At HelloFresh, we want to change the way people eat. Over the past 5 years we've seen this mission spread beyond our wildest dreams. So, how did we do it? Our weekly recipe boxes full of exciting recipes and lovingly sourced, fresh ingredients have blossomed into a community of inspired, energised home cooks that expands across the globe. Now we're the fastest growing company in Europe, active and growing in 9 different countries across 3 continents.


HelloFresh: Machine Learning Engineer

@machinelearnbot

At HelloFresh, we want to change the way people eat. Over the past 5 years we've seen this mission spread beyond our wildest dreams. So, how did we do it? Our weekly recipe boxes full of exciting recipes and lovingly sourced, fresh ingredients have blossomed into a community of inspired, energised home cooks that expands across the globe. Now we're the fastest growing company in Europe, active and growing in 9 different countries across 3 continents.


The First Chatbot Designed Specifically for Gyms – Chatbot's Life

#artificialintelligence

Although chatbots have been around since the release of ELIZA in 1966, texting and chatbots have only recently begun to revolutionize customer service. We're seeing industries like retail, travel and events adopt chatbots with great success. Now it's time for health clubs to do the same or get left behind to new ways of working out. We're building LegDay to lead the charge. LegDay makes a customer service chatbot for gyms.


Global Bigdata Conference

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While you've been sleeping, artificial intelligence has been evolving. It isn't something to be afraid of -- yet. In actuality, AI has been present in numerous industries for a long time. As development improves and transforms, both with AI-based analytics, also referred to as deep learning, and user feedback, AI is evolving from being the villain in a bad action movie to helping people live a better life through sleep and health and wellness tracking. As AI innovation improves, so do the apps being implemented in daily life.


Column: Life in the era of 'big data'

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Throughout the coming decade, data will be key to developing better solutions to our biggest problems, Shapiro writes. The sweeping changes of the past two decades show the power of data to improve our lives. Thanks to game-changing innovations such as artificial intelligence (AI), 5G and robotics, our knowledge about our needs and what makes us tick will soon be more exact and expansive than ever. Data provides us with a better picture of who we are, how we feel and what we like. Throughout the coming decade, data will be key to developing better solutions to our biggest problems.


Snuggle robots and talking toilets: CES 2018's wildest gadgets

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Are you ready to talk to your toilet? Those are just a few of the ideas we've seen at CES 2018, the annual consumer technology confab here at the Las Vegas Convention Center and other venues. Sure, there are tech titans here battling to control our computers, TVs and smart homes. But our favorite part is the thousands of other companies that gather to launch something new. While these ideas sometimes catch on, like fitness trackers and wireless ear buds, many go nowhere.


AI Detects Genetic Heart Condition from Wearable Data - Health Tech Insider

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While developers push forward with new health tech, other research teams on the hunt for solutions for specific medical conditions or health problems sometimes find new uses for existing technology. That's what happened at MyoKardia, a South San Francisco-based clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company. MyoKardia discovered an important new use for optical biosensors similar to the sensors used in fitness trackers. Scientists at MyoKardia studied the effectiveness of wrist-worn photoplethysmography (PPG) optical sensors in detecting obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (oHMC). According to the research team, approximately 630,000 people in the U.S. have HMC, but only about 15% are diagnosed.


School of Science welcomes three new professors this spring

MIT News

This spring, the MIT School of Science welcomes three new professors in the departments of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, and Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences. Michael Halassa aims to understand the neural basis of cognitive control and flexibility, particularly as it relates to attention and decision making. To study these questions, he has developed behavioral models of cognitive function in mice, allowing him to probe the underlying neural circuits and computations using parametric behavior, electrophysiological recordings, and causal manipulations. His major current focus is understanding the function of the thalamus, traditionally considered a relay station for sending sensory information to the cortex. Halassa is also a board-certified psychiatrist with fellowship training in psychotic disorders.