Training


School is finally in session for AR Drone Pilot training

Mashable

Flying drones is not for wimps. I'm not talking about the toy drones that float around your house, bouncing harmlessly off walls, people, and furniture, or even then $99 ones you keep losing over the ocean. I mean the real deal. Companies like DJI have built significant intelligence into their drones and vastly simplified the apps, but flying them is still a skill. SEE ALSO: DJI's Spark drone is so small and smart, it could be a game-changer The first time I flew an expensive drone, I couldn't get used to the pitch, yaw, forward, reverse, and elevation controls and flew it straight into a tree (okay, I backed up into it).


Cognitive software captures experts' performance on flight simulators

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Debrief tool used in the experiment displays a video replay of the operator console (similar to this map display), and a timeline of events suggested by AEMASE for discussion during debrief. The tool also includes visualizations of entity movement over time. Navy pilots and other flight specialists soon will have a new "smart machine" installed in training simulators that learns from expert instructors to more efficiently train their students. Sandia National Laboratories' Automated Expert Modeling & Student Evaluation (AEMASE, pronounced "amaze") is being provided to the Navy as a component of flight simulators. Components are now being used to train Navy personnel to fly H-60 helicopters and a complete system will soon be delivered for training on the E-2C Hawkeye aircraft, said Robert G. Abbott, a Sandia computer scientist and AEMASE's inventor.