Navy


The next race for autonomous vehicles? Self-driving boats

#artificialintelligence

Spurred in part by the car industry's race to build driverless vehicles, marine innovators are building automated ferry boats for Amsterdam canals, cargo ships that can steer themselves through Norwegian fjords and remote-controlled ships to carry containers across the Atlantic and Pacific. "We're in full autonomy now," said Jeff Gawrys, a marine technician for Boston startup Sea Machines Robotics, sitting at the helm as the boat floated through a harbor channel. The ocean is "a wide open space," said Sea Machines CEO Michael Johnson. In Norway, fertilizer company Yara International is working with engineering firm Kongsberg Maritime on a project to replace big-rig trucks with an electric-powered ship connecting three nearby ports.


Long in the works, self-driving boats may make a splash before autonomous cars

The Japan Times

Spurred in part by the car industry's race to build driverless vehicles, marine innovators are building automated ferry boats for Amsterdam canals, cargo ships that can steer themselves through Norwegian fjords and remote-controlled ships to carry containers across the Atlantic and Pacific. "We're in full autonomy now," said Jeff Gawrys, a marine technician for Boston start-up Sea Machines Robotics, sitting at the helm as the boat floated through a harbor channel. The start-up has signed a deal with an undisclosed company to install the "world's first autonomy system on a commercial containership," Johnson said this week. In Norway, fertilizer company Yara International is working with engineering firm Kongsberg Maritime on a project to replace big-rig trucks with an electric-powered ship connecting three nearby ports.


Self-driving ships could be ready in three years

Los Angeles Times

Spurred in part by the auto industry's race to build driverless vehicles, marine innovators are building automated ferry boats for Amsterdam canals, cargo ships that can steer themselves through Norwegian fjords and remote-controlled ships to carry containers across the Atlantic and Pacific. "We're in full autonomy now," said Jeff Gawrys, a marine technician for Boston startup Sea Machines Robotics, sitting at the helm as the boat floated through a harbor channel. The startup has signed a deal with an undisclosed company to install the "world's first autonomy system on a commercial container ship," Johnson said this week. In Norway, fertilizer company Yara International is working with engineering firm Kongsberg Maritime on a project to replace big-rig trucks with an electric-powered ship connecting three nearby ports.


British warships will soon have Siri-like voice controls

Engadget

British warships will soon integrate Siri-like voice systems into their controls, according to the head of the UK's Royal Navy. Speaking at the Defence and Security Equipment International exhibition -- one the biggest arms fairs in the world -- First Sea Lord Admiral Sir Phillip Jones said the Royal Navy wanted to embrace the speed at which warfare is being transformed by IT, and pointed to new Type-31 frigates as an example. "The Type 31e will feature different app-based tools which can access the ship's data. These will be operated from a series of touchscreen displays, Siri-style voice-controlled assistants and perhaps even augmented reality technology," Jones said.


Self-driving boats: The next tech transportation race

Boston Herald

Spurred in part by the car industry's race to build driverless vehicles, marine innovators are building automated ferry boats for Amsterdam canals, cargo ships that can steer themselves through Norwegian fjords and remote-controlled ships to carry containers across the Atlantic and Pacific. "We're in full autonomy now," said Jeff Gawrys, a marine technician for Boston startup Sea Machines Robotics, sitting at the helm as the boat floated through a harbor channel. The ocean is "a wide open space," said Sea Machines CEO Michael Johnson. In Norway, fertilizer company Yara International is working with engineering firm Kongsberg Maritime on a project to replace big-rig trucks with an electric-powered ship connecting three nearby ports.


Why Banning Killer AI Is Easier Said Than Done

#artificialintelligence

Gizmodo is excited to share an exclusive excerpt from Life 3.0, in which Tegmark discusses the pros and cons of outsourcing life-and-death decision making to a machine, a recent initiative to institute an international ban on autonomous killing machines, and why it'll be so difficult for the United States to relinquish this prospective technology. If wars consist merely of machines fighting machines, then no human soldiers or civilians need get killed. What he didn't realize at the time was that they shot down Iran Air Flight 655, a civilian Iranian passenger jet, killing all 290 people on board and causing international outrage. Now an automated Soviet early-warning system reported that the United States had launched five land-based nuclear missiles at the Soviet Union, leaving Officer Stanislav Petrov merely minutes to decide whether this was a false alarm.


Killer autonomous weapons are coming... but they're not here yet

#artificialintelligence

Pioneers from the worlds of artificial intelligence and robotics – including Elon Musk and Deepmind's Mustafa Suleyman – have asked the United Nations to ban autonomous weapon systems. In total, 19 nations have called for a complete ban on autonomous weapon systems since 2013: these include Mexico, Chile, Cuba, Ecuador, and Egypt. At an international autonomous weapon systems meeting in March last year, Vadim Kozyulin, from the Russian Federation said the country had a "long history" or producing automated weapons for air defence and the navy. Lt Col. John Stroud-Turp, from the Ministry of Defence, said putting a complete ban on autonomous weapon systems would stop research into semi-automated systems and that "autonomy in non-lethal areas" could be "stifled".


U.S. Navy reports another close call with Iran drone

The Japan Times

DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES – An unarmed Iranian drone shadowed a U.S. aircraft carrier at night and came close enough to F-18 fighter jets to put the lives of American pilots at risk, the Navy said Tuesday, reporting the second such tense encounter within a week. Iran's military and state-run media did not immediately report the incident, which came after a similar encounter Aug. 8, in which the Navy said an Iranian drone came within 100 feet (30 meters) of an F-18 preparing to land on the Nimitz. The incidents at sea almost always involved Iran's Revolutionary Guard, a paramilitary force that reports only to Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. Of the incidents at sea last year, the worst involved Iranian forces capturing and holding overnight 10 U.S. sailors who strayed into the Islamic Republic's territorial waters.


Iranian Drone Comes Close to U.S. Aircraft Carrier: U.S. Navy

U.S. News

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - An Iranian drone came within 1,000 feet (300 meters) of a U.S. aircraft carrier while it was in international waters in the Gulf conducting flight operations, a spokesman for the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command said on Monday.


Big Lizzie is outmanoeuvred by a £300 drone

Daily Mail

The drone pilot, who wanted to remain anonymous, made the daring flight while the aircraft carrier was docked at Invergordon, Scotland in July. Footage from the drone's camera shows it cruising over the enormous empty ship before landing. Panorama: Footage from the drone's camera shows it cruising over the enormous empty ship before landing on the deck Fears: The flight may now be discussed in Scotland's Parliament by MSPs concerned about possible security flaws One the move: Britain's most advanced warship set sail from the Rosyth dockyard in Fife in July'It turned out that the deck is covered by some sort of material to give better grip and it did not interfere with the electronics. The drone pilot said: 'I was amazed that I was able to land on the aircraft carrier for two reasons' Navy chiefs boasted the defence system on the UK's biggest ever warship, the HMS Queen Elizabeth, will be NASA standard - unlike the NHS system that was hacked into several months ago.