Navy


The U.S. Navy's New Robo-Boat Has No People, But It Does Have a Very Big Gun

#artificialintelligence

One of the most important but generally overlooked missions of the U.S. Navy is port security. While incidents in peacetime are generally rare, the 2000 terrorist attack on the destroyer USS Cole remains a real danger. Now the Navy is experimenting with using one of its newest unmanned boats as a way to protect warships sitting pierside from attack. In October 2000, the guided-missile destroyer USS Cole was refueling at the port of Aden in Yemen when it came under attack by Al Qaeda terrorists. A small boat loaded with explosives sidled up to the 10,000 ton destroyer and exploded, killing 17 U.S. Navy sailors and injuring 39.


New Iranian Missiles Pose Threat to U.S. Aircraft in Yemen, Pentagon Says

NYT > Middle East

According to an American military official, the 358 missile in flight is about nine feet long and can run on kerosene or diesel fuel contained in flexible containers that do not require a separate fuel pump. A dozen infrared lenses arranged in a ring around the missile are believed to be able to defeat heat-seeking countermeasures that coalition helicopters typically use. Another United States military official said that the 358 missiles from Iran had been fired against American drones flying in Yemeni airspace, but they had not yet succeeded in hitting any. Three of the 358 missiles were captured in November by the Forrest Sherman, a Navy destroyer, and five more were recovered this month in an operation by the Normandy, a Navy cruiser. Those shipments also included more than 170 antitank guided missiles made in Iran, as well as 13,000 blasting caps, which are critical to making modern roadside bombs.


The Case for Killer Robots: How Artificial Intelligence is Changing the American Battlefield

#artificialintelligence

A Navy X-47B drone is launched off the nuclear powered aircraft carrier USS George H. W. Bush off the coast of Virginia, Tuesday, May 14, 2013. It was the Navy's first test flight of the unmanned aircraft off a carrier. A Navy X-47B drone is launched off the nuclear powered aircraft carrier USS George H. W. Bush off the coast of Virginia, Tuesday, May 14, 2013. It was the Navy's first test flight of the unmanned aircraft off a carrier. Dr. Robert J. Marks, Director of the Walter Bradley Center for Natural and Artificial Intelligence, joins the Nick Digilio Show to make the case for killer robots.


U.K. Invests in Revolutionary Artificial Intelligence Warships

#artificialintelligence

With an aim to help warship crews make quick decisions and process data efficiently, the U.K.'s Ministry of Defense recently announced contracts to use AI-based (artificial intelligence) technology in warships. According to a source, Defense and Security Accelerator (DASA) will be funding £1 million (around US$1.3 million) for AI contracts as part of its "Intelligent Ship – The Next Generation" competition, which is aimed at using innovative approaches for Human-AI and AI-AI teaming for various defense platforms like warships, aircraft, and land vehicles. James Heappey, U.K.'s Defense Minister, said, "The astonishing pace at which global threats are evolving requires new approaches and fresh thinking to the way we develop our ideas and technology. The funding will research pioneering projects into how AI and automation can support our armed forces in their essential day-to-day work." DASA's warship competition, in alliance with the Defense Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl), is intended to enhance the designs of future defense platforms by using advances in automation, autonomy, machine learning, and AI.


U.K. Invests in Revolutionary Artificial Intelligence Warships

#artificialintelligence

With an aim to help warship crews make quick decisions and process data efficiently, the U.K.'s Ministry of Defense recently announced contracts to use AI-based (artificial intelligence) technology in warships. According to a source, Defense and Security Accelerator (DASA) will be funding £1 million (around US$1.3 million) for AI contracts as part of its "Intelligent Ship – The Next Generation" competition, which is aimed at using innovative approaches for Human-AI and AI-AI teaming for various defense platforms like warships, aircraft, and land vehicles. James Heappey, U.K.'s Defense Minister, said, "The astonishing pace at which global threats are evolving requires new approaches and fresh thinking to the way we develop our ideas and technology. The funding will research pioneering projects into how AI and automation can support our armed forces in their essential day-to-day work." DASA's warship competition, in alliance with the Defense Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl), is intended to enhance the designs of future defense platforms by using advances in automation, autonomy, machine learning, and AI.


How Artificial Intelligence Will Make Decisions In Tomorrow's Wars

#artificialintelligence

Yes, companies use AI to automate various tasks, while consumers use AI to make their daily routines easier. But governments–and in particular militaries–also have a massive interest in the speed and scale offered by AI. Nation states are already using artificial intelligence to monitor their own citizens, and as the U.K.'s Ministry of Defence (MoD) revealed last week, they'll also be using AI to make decisions related to national security and warfare. The MoD's Defence and Security Accelerator (DASA) has announced the initial injection of £4 million in funding for new projects and startups exploring how to use AI in the context of the British Navy. In particular, the DASA is looking to support AI- and machine learning-based technology that will "revolutionise the way warships make decisions and process thousands of strands of intelligence and data."


Global Big Data Conference

#artificialintelligence

Yes, companies use AI to automate various tasks, while consumers use AI to make their daily routines easier. But governments–and in particular militaries–also have a massive interest in the speed and scale offered by AI. Nation states are already using artificial intelligence to monitor their own citizens, and as the UK's Ministry of Defence (MoD) revealed last week, they'll also be using AI to make decisions related to national security and warfare. The MoD's Defence and Security Accelerator (DASA) has announced the initial injection of £4 million in funding for new projects and startups exploring how to use AI in the context of the British Navy. In particular, the DASA is looking to support AI- and machine learning-based technology that will "revolutionise the way warships make decisions and process thousands of strands of intelligence and data."


How Artificial Intelligence Will Make Decisions In Tomorrow's Wars

#artificialintelligence

Yes, companies use AI to automate various tasks, while consumers use AI to make their daily routines easier. But governments–and in particular militaries–also have a massive interest in the speed and scale offered by AI. Nation states are already using artificial intelligence to monitor their own citizens, and as the UK's Ministry of Defence (MoD) revealed last week, they'll also be using AI to make decisions related to national security and warfare. The MoD's Defence and Security Accelerator (DASA) has announced the initial injection of £4 million in funding for new projects and startups exploring how to use AI in the context of the British Navy. In particular, the DASA is looking to support AI- and machine learning-based technology that will "revolutionise the way warships make decisions and process thousands of strands of intelligence and data."


Revolutionary Artificial Intelligence warship contracts announced

#artificialintelligence

The funding aims to revolutionise the way warships make decisions and process thousands of strands of intelligence and data by using Artificial Intelligence (A.I.). Nine projects will share an initial £1 million to develop technology and innovative solutions to overcome increasing'information overload' faced by crews as part of DASA's Intelligent Ship – The Next Generation competition. The astonishing pace at which global threats are evolving requires new approaches and fresh-thinking to the way we develop our ideas and technology. The funding will research pioneering projects into how A.I and automation can support our armed forces in their essential day-to-day work. Intelligent Ship is focused on inventive approaches for Human-AI and AI-AI teaming for defence platforms – such as warships, aircraft, and land vehicles – in 2040 and beyond.


Pacific Commander: Sub-hunting spy plane missions continue in Pacific

FOX News

Aviation Maintenance Administrationman 3rd Class Shea Wright, assigned to the Skinny Dragons of Patrol Squadron (VP) 4, recovers a squadron P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft following an anti-submarine warfare mission over the Atlantic Ocean, Nov. 30, 2019. The increasingly global reach of Chinese nuclear-armed ballistic missile submarines, armed with JL-2 weapons reportedly able to hit parts of the U.S., continues to inspire an ongoing Navy effort to accelerate production of attack submarines, prepare long-dwell drones for deployment to the Pacific and continue acquisition of torpedo-armed sub-hunting planes such as the P-8/A Poseidon. The Navy has been moving quickly to increase its fleet of Poseidon's on an accelerated timetable; in the Navy's 2020 budget, the service was authorized for a near term increase in Poseidon production by three, moving funding for the year up for nine Poseidons, as cited in a report from USNI news. Last year, the Navy awarded Boeing a $2.4 billion deal to produce 19 more P-8A Poseidon surveillance and attack planes. The Poseidon increase appears to align with the service's overall Pacific theater strategy, which makes a point to sustain peaceful, yet vital surveillance and Freedom of Navigation missions in the region.