Cyberwarfare


AI versus humans in the fight against cybercrime

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Reliance on artificial intelligence (AI) to combat cybersecurity threats looks set to increase by several orders of magnitude over the next few years. A recent report from P&S Market Research suggests that the global AI cybersecurity market will reach US$18.1 billion by 2023. As the overall size of the attack surface continues to expand, it's simply not feasible for cybersecurity teams to defend against every threat without some additional help. AI's playing an important role in helping automate threat detection and response, which in turn, eases the burden on these teams. If we take a look at social engineering attacks such as spear phishing and business email compromise (BEC), they're extremely hard to detect.


Zero-days, fileless attacks are now the most dangerous threats to the enterprise

ZDNet

Zero-day vulnerabilities and fileless attacks are now deemed the most dangerous threats to the enterprise. According to a study conducted by the Ponemon Institute and sponsored by Barkly, called the "2018 State of Endpoint Security Risk report," nearly two-thirds of enterprise players have been compromised in the past 12 months by attacks which originated at endpoints, which the organization says is a 20 percent increase year-on-year. Such attacks can prove costly, with the average company enduring a cost of $7.12 million, or $440 per endpoint. Small to medium-sized businesses, which may not have the same cybersecurity solutions or teams in place due to investment limitations, suffer more -- with the same damage cost of endpoints close to double at $763. In total, the average cost of a successful endpoint-based attack has increased by roughly 42 percent year-on-year.


The Future is Fintech: 4 Drivers of Change in Financial Services

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The world of financial services has reached a point of no return along the road of digital transformation. A combination of several factors is driving this shift: the rise of big data, consumers' demands for convenient and affordable financial services, and the proliferation of mobile technology are all responsible. Financial services companies must adopt automated, data-drive solutions to successfully compete against new, technology-based entrants. Although the rules surrounding developing fintech are still under construction, its potential to improve operational efficiency, safeguard investments, and fortify cybersecurity, is uncapped. At this point in the game, technology adoption is mandatory for financial institutions.


IBM brings artificial intelligence to the heart of cybersecurity strategies

ZDNet

IBM has launched IBM Security Connect, a new platform designed to bring vendors, developers, AI, and data together to improve cyber incident response and abilities. On Monday, the New York-based technology company unveiled the open platform, which IBM says "is the first security cloud platform built on open technologies, with AI at its core, to analyze federated security data across previously unconnected tools and environments." An analysis conducted by IBM suggests that cybersecurity teams in the enterprise use, on average, over 80 cybersecurity solutions provided by roughly 40 vendors. This is a potential recipe for chaos and may reduce the overall effectiveness of security and defense. IBM Security Connect makes use of both cloud technology and AI.


What is Cyber Security Month? How to perform Google's Security Checkup and stay safe online

The Independent

If you've visited Google's homepage recently, you may have noticed a small note indicating that it is Cyber Security Month, together with a message encouraging you to perform a "quick Security Checkup". The awareness campaign, which first began in the US in 2004 before spreading to the EU in 2012, is part of a major effort to promote cyber security issues and educate the public on the dangers of online attacks. Cyber security has become an increasingly risky area in recent years, with the World Economic Forum's Global Risks Report 2018 naming cyber attacks as the third top cause of global disruption over the next five years, behind natural disasters and catastrophic weather events. In order to protect against such occurrences, both businesses and individuals are encouraged to increase their awareness of the potential risks in order to improve their safety. How to perform Google's Security Checkup Performing Google's Security Checkup can be done by either visiting the Google Search page and following the link at the bottom, or simply by clicking here.


How Three Waves Of Cybersecurity Innovation Led Us Here

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We live in a world where it appears to be a matter of when, not if, an enterprise is breached. Billions of dollars have been spent on beefing up cybersecurity, but the bad guys keep winning. Securing even a small organization seems quite hard. How did we get here? The computer industry has had to fight against evolving sophistication in threats throughout its history.


Artificial Intelligence: The Key Cybersecurity Weapon in the IoT Era

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As businesses struggle to combat increasingly sophisticated cybersecurity attacks, the severity of which is exacerbated by both the vanishing IT perimeters in today's mobile and IoT era, coupled with an acute shortage of skilled security professionals, IT security teams need both a new approach and powerful new tools to protect data and other high-value assets. Increasingly, they are looking to artificial intelligence (AI) as a key weapon to win the battle against stealthy threats inside their IT infrastructures, according to a new global research study conducted by the Ponemon Institute on behalf of Aruba, a Hewlett Packard Enterprise company. The Ponemon Institute study, entitled "Closing the IT Security Gap with Automation & AI in the Era of IoT," surveyed 4,000 security and IT professionals across the Americas, Europe and Asia to understand what makes security deficiencies so hard to fix, and what types of technologies and processes are needed to stay a step ahead of bad actors within the new threat landscape. The research revealed that in the quest to protect data and other high-value assets, security systems incorporating machine learning and other AI-based technologies are essential for detecting and stopping attacks that target users and IoT devices. Twenty four percent of Indian respondents said they currently use some form of machine-learning or other AI-based security solution, with another 29 percent stating they plan on deploying these types of products within the next 12 months.


The Growing AI/Cyber Nexus

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While the debate about artificial intelligence (AI) and augmented reality rages, virtual terrorists – those who operate primarily on the Dark Web – are getting smarter and thinking of new ways to benefit from both, creating methods to operate autonomously in this brave new world. Malware is being designed with adaptive, success-based learning to improve the accuracy and efficacy of cyberattacks. The coming generation of malware will be situation-aware, meaning that it will understand the environment it is in and make calculated decisions about what to do next, behaving like a human attacker: performing reconnaissance, identifying targets, choosing methods of attack, and intelligently evading detection. This next generation of malware uses code that is a precursor to AI, replacing traditional "if not this, then that" code logic with more complex decision-making trees. Autonomous malware operates much like branch prediction technology, designed to guess which branch of a decision tree a transaction will take before it is executed.


AI is Key Cybersecurity Weapon in IoT Era

#artificialintelligence

As businesses struggle to combat increasingly sophisticated cybersecurity attacks, the severity of which is exacerbated by both the vanishing IT perimeters in today's mobile and IoT era, coupled with an acute shortage of skilled security professionals, IT security teams need both a new approach and powerful new tools to protect data and other high-value assets. Increasingly, they are looking to artificial intelligence (AI) as a key weapon to win the battle against stealthy threats inside their IT infrastructures, according to a new global research study conducted by the Ponemon Institute on behalf of Aruba, a Hewlett Packard Enterprise company. The Ponemon Institute study, entitled "Closing the IT Security Gap with Automation & AI in the Era of IoT," surveyed 4,000 security and IT* professionals across the Americas, Europe and Asia to understand what makes security deficiencies so hard to fix, and what types of technologies and processes are needed to stay a step ahead of bad actors within the new threat landscape. The research revealed that in the quest to protect data and other high-value assets, security systems incorporating machine learning and other AI-based technologies are essential for detecting and stopping attacks that target users and IoT devices. The majority of respondents from India agree that security products with AI functionality will help to: * Reduce false alerts (69 percent) * Increase their team's effectiveness (65 percent) * Provide greater investigation efficiencies (56 percent) * Advance their ability to more quickly discover and respond to stealthy attacks that have evaded perimeter defense systems (66 percent).


AI security hype putting businesses at risk Artificial Intelligence and Cybersecurity

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As organization go through digital transformation the cyber challenges they face become more important. Their IT systems and applications become more critical and at the same time more open. The recent data breach suffered by British Airways illustrates the sophistication of the cyber adversaries and the difficulties faced by organization to prevent, detect and respond to these challenges.