Army


Army researchers develop A.I. tech that helps U.S. soldiers learn 13x faster than conventional methods

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A Phys.org article states that Army researchers are making huge strides in the field of artificial intelligence (AI) that can support U.S. soldiers on the battlefield. Their latest development is an affordable yet capable AI assistant that can reportedly help human troops learn more than 13 times faster than normal training methods. Featuring vastly improved machine learning capabilities, the AI will be installed upon the Army's future ground combat vehicles. It is intended to help a human soldier spot important clues, recognize the developing situation, and come up with a solution to the problem on the fly. The AI would reportedly help preserve American lives during the chaos of combat.


The U.S. Army Is Turning to Robot Soldiers

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From the spears hurled by Romans to the missiles launched by fighter pilots, the weapons humans use to kill each other have always been subject to improvement. Militaries seek to make each one ever-more lethal and, in doing so, better protect the soldier who wields it. But in the next evolution of combat, the U.S. Army is heading down a path that may lead humans off the battlefield entirely. Over the next few years, the Pentagon is poised to spend almost $1 billion for a range of robots designed to complement combat troops. Beyond scouting and explosives disposal, these new machines will sniff out hazardous chemicals or other agents, perform complex reconnaissance and even carry a soldier's gear.


Of course 'Battlefield V' is getting a battle royale mode

Engadget

EA started off its EA Play show at E3 answering a question on everyone's lips: Will Battlefield V follow the shooter vogue and have its own battle royale mode? While the game's leads introducing the feature offered no details, the franchise's Twitter account tweeted that it will have team play and vehicles. Time will tell if the game puts its own spin on the mode or is just trying to cash in on the zeitgeist, but at least it won't have loot boxes. Royale is coming to #Battlefield V, reimagined with the core pillars of destruction, team play, and vehicles. It will be unlike anything you've played before, and we'll have more to talk about later this year.


E3 2018: 'Battlefield 5' Battle Royale Mode Confirmed

Forbes Technology

Battle Royale is coming to Battlefield 5. During today's EA Play livestream, DICE confirmed a battle royale mode coming to Battlefield 5. That's about all the information we got about the new mode, though we learned that it will be different (somehow) from any battle royale game out now, with all of the things that make Battlefield distinct, such as destructible environments and vehicles. Many people seem to think that we already have a saturated battle royale market for some reason, despite having just two actual contenders in that space. You could hear some audible groaning in the crowd when the battle royale mode was announced. The thinking seems to be that battle royale is a trend and that trend-chasing is foolish.


'Battlefield V' hops on the battle royale bandwagon

Mashable

Battlefield V, falling in line with every other game where guns are the focus, will have a battle royale mode. Electronic Arts revealed that Battlefield V will have a battle royale mode during its press conference at E3 on Saturday, an announcement that comes just weeks after Activision revealed Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 will be doing the same. The world of competitive online shooting games officially has battle royale fever. EA didn't reveal many details about Battlefield V's battle royale mode but it will ostensibly fall in line with the popular model set forth by PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds and Fortnite: Battle Royale in which a whole bunch of players enter a map and fight until there's only one player or squad left standing. SEE ALSO: 'Battlefield V' brings huge changes, but maybe not what you're expecting This is new territory for the Battlefield series, which has traditionally done team-based multiplayer where there is no lack of resources for players.


U.S. soldier killed, four wounded during operation against al-Shabab Islamists in Somalia

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON – One U.S. special operations soldier was killed and four U.S. service members were wounded in an "enemy attack" Friday in Somalia, the U.S. military said -- casualties that are likely to put renewed scrutiny on America's counterterrorism operations in Africa. It was the first public announcement of a U.S. military combat death on the continent since four U.S. service members were killed in a militant ambush in the west African nation of Niger in October. President Donald Trump paid tribute on Twitter on Friday night, offering "thoughts and prayers" to the families of the soldier who was killed and those who were wounded. "They are truly all HEROES," he tweeted. U.S. Africa Command said in a statement that U.S. troops with Somali and Kenyan forces came under mortar and small-arms fire in Jubaland, Somalia, at around 2:45 p.m.


1 US soldier killed, 4 wounded in attack in Somalia

FOX News

WASHINGTON – One U.S. special operations soldier was killed and four U.S. service members wounded in an "enemy attack" Friday in Somalia, the U.S. military said -- casualties that are likely to put renewed scrutiny on America's counterterror operations in Africa. It's the first public announcement of a U.S. military combat death on the continent since four U.S. service members were killed in a militant ambush in the west African nation of Niger in October. U.S. Africa Command said in a statement that U.S. troops with Somali and Kenyan forces came under mortar and small-arms fire in Jubaland, Somalia, at around 2.45 p.m. local time. One member of the "partner forces" was wounded. One of the wounded U.S. service members received sufficient medical care in the field, and the other three were medically evacuated for additional treatment.


US soldiers to get mini surveillance drone in new $2.6m deal

Daily Mail

The U.S. military has been looking to incorporate elements of artificial intelligence and machine learning into its drone program. Project Maven, as the effort is known, aims to provide some relief to military analysts who are part of the war against Islamic State. These analysts currently spend long hours staring at big screens reviewing video feeds from drones as part of the hunt for insurgents in places like Iraq and Afghanistan. The Pentagon is trying to develop algorithms that would sort through the material and alert analysts to important finds, according to Air Force Lieutenant General John N.T. 'Jack' Shanahan, director for defense intelligence for warfighting support. Military bosses say intelligence analysts are'overwhelmed' by the amount of video being recorded over the battlefield by drones with high resolution cameras'A lot of times these things are flying around(and)... there's nothing in the scene that's of interest,' he told Reuters.


Research Shows How AI Will Help Brands Win on the Customer Experience Battlefield

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Andy Betts is a chief marketer, consultant and digital hybrid with more than 25 years of experience in digital and marketing technology--working across London, Europe, New York, and San Francisco. He works as a global executive adviser and consultant for start-ups, agencies, and many Fortune 500 companies. He spends considerable time working in marketing technology communities on strategic marketing initiatives, influence and public relations projects.


AI Method Could Speed Up Development of Specialized Nanoparticles

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Summary: A new artificial intelligence technique could speed up complex physics simulations and help create multilayered nanoparticles, researchers say. A new technique developed by MIT physicists could someday provide a way to custom-design multilayered nanoparticles with desired properties, potentially for use in displays, cloaking systems, or biomedical devices. It may also help physicists tackle a variety of thorny research problems, in ways that could in some cases be orders of magnitude faster than existing methods. The innovation uses computational neural networks, a form of artificial intelligence, to "learn" how a nanoparticle's structure affects its behavior, in this case the way it scatters different colors of light, based on thousands of training examples. Then, having learned the relationship, the program can essentially be run backward to design a particle with a desired set of light-scattering properties -- a process called inverse design.