Army


Why is the US military building a vast AI system and how will it change the battlefield of the future?

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The Pentagon is set to award a $10bn "war cloud" contract to a technology company next month, with both Amazon and Microsoft competing for the chance to build a military-grade AI computing system. The Joint Enterprise Defence Infrastructure (Jedi) plan faces a number of obstacles before the US defence department makes its decision next month, not least from within the companies' own work forces. Microsoft employees published an open letter on Medium last year, pleading the tech giant to not bid on the Jedi contract. "Many Microsoft employees don't believe that what we build should be used for waging war," they wrote. We'll tell you what's true.


Want to learn how to train an artificial intelligence model? Ask a friend.

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The MIT Machine Intelligence Community began with a few friends meeting over pizza to discuss landmark papers in machine learning. Three years later, the undergraduate club boasts 500 members, an active Slack channel, and an impressive lineup of student-led reading groups and workshops meant to demystify machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) generally. This year, MIC and MIT Quest for Intelligence joined forces to advance their common cause of making AI tools accessible to all. Starting last fall, the MIT Quest opened its offices to MIC members and extended access to IBM and Google-donated cloud credits, providing a boost of computing power to students previously limited to running their AI models on desktop machines loaded with extra graphics processors. The MIT Quest and MIC are now collaborating on a host of projects, independently and through MIT's Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP).


SEMI Teams with Cornell University to Accelerate Technology Development Using Machine Learning and AI

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SEMI announced a research and development (R&D) project to speed technology progress and problem-solving in microelectronics manufacturing and across the supply chain by driving new efficiencies using machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI). Under an agreement with SEMI, Cornell University will optimize and accelerate two critical process steps – lithography and plasma etch. Supported through SEMI's R&D program with the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL), the project aims to help accelerate the adoption of data-driven AI methodologies to streamline microelectronics operations. The project will lay the foundation for SEMI to establish data transfer and management standards crucial to the trusted exchange of trade secrets, IP and other sensitive information. New standards and protocols are vital as the industry moves into the era of big data.


AI: towards a critical utopia

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It is commonly understood that AI is one of the most disruptive technologies being developed. It may affect almost every aspect of society – from knowledge sharing to economic interactions, from making art crafts to finding cures for our diseases – and of personal life – from making friends, to finding a partner, from dealing with the pain for the loss of beloved people, to helping us managing our households through smart objects. Understanding the relationship between AI and society is a complex endeavour, since its shape and its evolution are not an immutable technological law, but instead the consequence of specific choices, both private and public, that could very well change over time and may of course influence its sustainability. Some powerful politicians like Vladimir Putin have declared that who will lead the researches in the field of AI, will lead the world, and of course many funds are coming from the armies (Harari, 2015) and from governments that seem to be working for monitoring and controlling us (Greenwald, 2015; Zuboff, 2018). Many others come from the finance world and are meant to increase the incomes of a few rich persons, regardless the risks ran by the rest of the population (O'Neil, 2016).


CIPD 2018: Language of AI and automation spreads fear

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The language of artificial intelligence (AI) and automation is misused and incites fear among the workforce, according to a panel on day two of the 2018 CIPD Annual Conference and Exhibition. Speaking during a panel session called'Will automation and artificial intelligence (AI) help or hinder good people management?', Andrew Spence, HR transformation director at Glass Bead Consulting, said that there's "fear-mongering" in the rhetoric that "the robots will take our jobs". "The word robot comes from the word'robota', which means slave so the language puts fear in people," he said. But the "term AI has a naming problem in itself", he continued, pointing out that there are multiple ways people would define the word intelligence. Cheryl Allen, HR director transformation at Atos, agreed that "people use AI as a general [term] and so many words are used interchangeably".


Death by algorithm: the age of killer robots is closer than you think

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A conquering army wants to take a major city but doesn't want troops to get bogged down in door-to-door fighting as they fan out across the urban area. Instead, it sends in a flock of thousands of small drones, with simple instructions: Shoot everyone holding a weapon. A few hours later, the city is safe for the invaders to enter. This sounds like something out of a science fiction movie. But the technology to make it happen is mostly available today -- and militaries worldwide seem interested in developing it. Experts in machine learning and military technology say it would be technologically straightforward to build robots that make decisions about whom to target and kill without a "human in the loop" -- that is, with no person involved at any point between identifying a target and killing them.


Army Hopes to Field Robotic Mules to Carry Gear Next Year

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The Army will begin equipping combat units next year with remote-controlled robotic vehicles designed to carry ammunition, water and other heavy combat necessities for soldiers, if officials at Fort Benning, Georgia, get their way. The Army has been experimenting with the concept of robotic mules for more than a decade. But the performance of four competing prototypes of a Small Multipurpose Equipment Transport (SMET) during a recent operational test demonstration with units from the 10th Mountain and 101st Airborne divisions has made believers out of officials from Benning's Maneuver Capabilities Development and Integration Directorate (MCDID). "The operational test demonstration really showed that the capability is ready," Col. Tom Nelson, director for Robotics Requirements Division at MCDID, told reporters Tuesday. The SMET is capable of hauling 1,000 pounds of soldier gear for 60 miles within 72 hours, and will also generate three kilowatts of power to charge the growing number of tactical electronic devices soldiers carry, according to officials at MCDID, the organization that has the lead for developing and testing robotics and autonomous systems designed for Army brigade combat teams (BCTs).


Let's make AI - Soldier AI pt.3 // Cover System

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You can see the AI Soldiers in action at the end of this video. In this video we continue the development of our soldier AI. We'll implement a cover system for our AI Soldiers. After this video, The AI Soldiers will look for the best suitable cover, move towards it and then begin their combat state. The AI is use pathfinding, which we implemented in part 2 of this tutorial series: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v al6fF... Our base AI uses the FSM (Finite-State Machine) Technique implemented in the first video of this tutorial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v Mbtkp... Soldier Model used in this video: https://assetstore.unity.com/packages... #artificialIntelligence #coversystem #madewithunity



This $3.2 Billion Industry Could Turn Millions of Surveillance Cameras Into an Army of Robot Security Guards

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We are surrounded by surveillance cameras that record us at every turn. But for the most part, while those cameras are watching us, no one is watching what those cameras observe or record because no one will pay for the armies of security guards that would be required for such a time-consuming and monotonous task. But imagine that all that video were being watched -- that millions of security guards were monitoring them all 24/7. Imagine this army is made up of guards who don't need to be paid, who never get bored, who never sleep, who never miss a detail, and who have total recall for everything they've seen. Such an army of watchers could scrutinize every person they see for signs of "suspicious" behavior.