Army


Indian Army set to release AI blueprint soon

#artificialintelligence

In an attempt to match capabilities of adversaries like China, the Indian Army is set to release a blueprint on the setting up of an artificial intelligence system that will reduce human errors and over-dependence on manpower. The AI will be integrated so as to advance surveillance and help mobilise troops quicker, since the army is currently dependent only upon foot patrols in difficult terrains, such as the Chinese frontier. To this end, a seminar is being conducted by the Jaipur-based South Western Command of the Indian Army at Hisar to explore AI based defence applications with experts and industry representatives. It is also intended to be an opportunity to discuss research and development for futuristic weapon platforms.


Army wants AI in big way to boost combat lethality India News - Times of India

#artificialintelligence

The South Western Command will be holding a two-day brain-storming session with top military officers, scientists and IT experts on "AI in mechanised (tanks and infantry combat vehicles) warfare" at Hissar next week Rajnath Singh is likely to announce "25 defence-specific AI products" that will be developed by 2024 The South Western Command will be holding a two-day brain-storming session with top military officers, scientists and IT experts on "AI in mechanised (tanks and infantry combat vehicles) warfare" at Hissar next week Rajnath Singh is likely to announce "25 defence-specific AI products" that will be developed by 2024 NEW DELHI: The Army now wants to harness the potential of artificial intelligence (AI) to bolster its combat lethality and survivability, even as the 13-lakh force is testing its new integrated battle groups (IBGs) geared towards mobilising fast and striking hard across the borders. With China taking huge strides in the ongoing global race to develop AI-powered weapon and surveillance systems for futuristic wars, with a special focus on developing lethal autonomous weapon systems (LAWS), India obviously does not want to miss the bus. "China is employing AI (basically simulation of human intelligence processes by computers) in the defence arena in a big way. But we can catch up because we have the required IT (information technology) brains in India. Our aim is to examine how AI can help us become more lethal and effective in our war-fighting in a flexible and dynamic battlefield," said South Western Command (SWC) chief Lt-General Alok Kler, speaking to TOI on Friday.


Army to host seminar on artificial intelligence next week; seeks to enhance its lethality

#artificialintelligence

NEW DELHI: With artificial intelligence set to dictate change in the nature of future battlefields, a first-of-its kind thematic seminar is being organised by the Army on September 25, seeking to harness the power of AI to boost the armed forces' combat capabilities, officials said on Friday. The seminar on AI, the first in connection with military field formation, being organised by the South Western Command'Sapta Shakti' of the Army at Hisar Military Station, will also be attended by domain experts from academia and the industry. Artificial intelligence is an emerging, disruptive technology affecting civil and military domains across the globe, a senior army official said. "The aim of the event is to bring together professionals, eminent speakers from the defence industry, academia, defence officers to brainstorm the way ahead with an objective to identify and conceptualise AI-based defence applications and platforms for the future battlefield," he said. South Western Command chief Lt Gen Alok Singh Kler said, disruptive technologies like artificial intelligence will dictate how the future warfare will happen.


Artificial intelligence is next most disruptive technology in Military Affairs: Army officer Devdiscourse

#artificialintelligence

Seeking to fight future wars with indigenous artificial intelligence (AI), a top Army officer on Friday said, India will soon catch up with the world in terms of advancements in the modern warfare technology and AI is going to be the next most disruptive technology in military affairs. Indicating departure from the conventional war techniques, South Western Army Commander Lieutenant General Alok Kler said, "It's time to incorporate assisted decision making in future warfare to be more efficient and more accurate." "AI is the next most disruptive technology in the revolution of Military Affairs as it is going to make the equipment more lethal," he added. Speaking on the possibility of a complete AI war, the official said that we can use AI in the next 10 years for decision making but a war based on AI is a distant possibility. Highlighting the technological race, the official said that India is a late starter in the field of artificial intelligence but will slowly catch up really quickly and added that most of the infotech brains are coming from South Asia.


Army details mission of AI task force

FOX News

File photo - U.S. soldiers from the 3rd Cavalry Regiment watch as CH-47 Chinook helicopter from the 82nd Combat Aviation Brigade lands after an advising mission at the Afghan National Army headquarters for the 203rd Corps in the Paktia province of Afghanistan December 21, 2014. Warrior Maven: What is the primary purpose of the Army's AI Task Force? Matty: The Army AI Task Force was established with a Secretary of the Army directive in October of 2018. There are four thrusts or top initiatives from the Secretary's directive. One component is we are leveraging AI to help our talent management in human resources.


'Killer robots': Pentagon advances combat AI despite fears, opposition

#artificialintelligence

The Army's Artificial Intelligence Task Force, with headquarters in the heart of the Rust Belt, is a crucial component of a grand Pentagon plan to incorporate robots and machine learning into 21st-century warfare. For skeptics, the task force is the concrete embodiment of how the U.S. is headed down a rocky, uncertain road that could put humanity itself in danger. The raging debate over AI, including its implications for the human race and the morality of its use in warfare, has divided the U.S. from some traditional allies. It also is fueling a growing band of activists who warn that "killer robots" are on the horizon of a military that has no comprehensive plan to stop them or understand their implications. Deep, philosophical questions about the ramifications of AI technology -- who is responsible for writing ethical guidelines, to what extent must humans remain in the loop, how much easier is it to fight a war fought (initially) by machines, and who bears the blame if a robot or drone ultimately targets humans -- are just beginning to be confronted in a systematic way.


Army AI Task Force builds new prototypes for armored vehicles

FOX News

The Lynx Infantry Fighting Vehicle - file photo. Streamlining multiple targeting sensors to destroy long-range targets, arming forward-positioned robots to penetrate enemy defenses and receiving organized weather-specific terrain mapping from nearby drones - are all emerging combat dynamics increasingly made possible by AI-enabled weapons and technologies. New applications of AI are consolidating data from otherwise disparate sensor systems, analyzing seemingly limitless amounts of targeting data in seconds and instantly sifting through hours of drone video to massively improve attack options and shorten "sensor-to-shooter" time. "We are developing an AI stack regarding how we pull together the sensors, computing layer and analytics to manage the data," Col. Doug Matty, Army AI Task Force Deputy Director, told Warrior in an interview. New algorithms, AI-enabled computer processing and high-speed networking are all specific elements of work now underway with the Army's AI Task Force, an emerging Army effort to collaborate with industry and academia, find technology breakthroughs and develop new applications for AI, Matty explained.


AI for Physical Security – Analytics Jobs

#artificialintelligence

As of today, lots of companies state to assist security firms, the army, in addition to consumers prevent crime and defend their private, homes, and buildings belongings. This particular article intends to offer business leaders in the security space with a concept of what they are able to presently expect from Ai in the business of theirs. We wish this report allows company leaders in security to garner insights they are able to confidently relay to the executive teams of theirs so they are able to make educated choices when thinking about AI adoption. At the minimum, this article intends to serve as a technique of decreasing the time industry leaders in physical security spend researching AI businesses with whom they might (or might not) be keen on working. Evolv Technology claims to offer a physical security system that consists of the Evolve Edgepersonnel threat screening machine that works with the Evolv Pinpoint automated facial recognition application.


U.S. Army banks on artificial intelligence to beat China and Russia

#artificialintelligence

A key piece of the Pentagon's plan to beat China and Russia in the high-stakes artificial intelligence race lies inside a research facility along the Allegheny River here, where a small but select U.S. Army team has been tasked with creating the weapons, vehicles and sensors needed for 21st-century combat. Inside, the U.S. military is feverishly working to incorporate AI into its operations in a myriad of ways, including drones and robots to ferry wounded soldiers away from the battlefield, software that can spot a hidden enemy force over a hill, AI programs that can give generals and line soldiers a fuller picture of a confusing battle, and even algorithms that can outperform any resume in determining the right men and women for a specific job. Those projects, and a host of others, form the backbone of a major Pentagon initiative that carries far-reaching implications for the 21st century global balance of power. The Army's AI Task Force, created earlier this year as part of the Defense Department's broader effort to turn what was once science fiction into reality, has brought together military officials and academic leaders at Carnegie Mellon University, an institution considered to be the birthplace of AI research. Tucked in a spot more than two miles off the main campus that is unlikely to be found unless one knew where to look, the school's National Robotics Engineering Center serves as the epicenter of a partnership between the Army and academia.


The Rise of T-1000: Artificial Intelligence on the Battlefield - ClearanceJobs

#artificialintelligence

Artificial Intelligence (AI) or machine learning is being used by military intelligence and at the high strategic level. The question is whether this technology will ever filter down to the soldier actually doing the fighting on the ground? Science fiction novels and movies suggest a system that can communicate with a warfighter in real time and provide situational awareness, but how far is the fiction from reality? "The most important weapon is situation awareness, and there are AI-based tools to help a lot with this," explained Jim Purtilo, associate professor of computer science at the University of Maryland. "Visualization, communication, simple planning, these all go together at squad level," Purtilo told ClearanceJobs. "Being able to leverage augmented reality to'see' where the bad guys are, this is very cool. Being able to aim your squad weapon at a target and in effect use it as a pointer to call in indirect fire, even cooler."