Army


What to Stream This Weekend: War Movies for Memorial Day

The New Yorker

That's why, in compiling a group of war films, I've organized them by the war that they depict. For that matter, they don't all depict war directly; some depict the prelude to war or the aftermath of war, the emotional devastation that's wrought away from the battlefield, or the political and diplomatic maneuvering that go into war or, at best, prevent it. Because the Second World War still looms so large in political culture and, for that matter, culture at large, I've pulled together a batch of films that considers it from a varied range of perspectives. Zachary Treitz, "Men Go to Battle" (Amazon, iTunes, and others) John Ford, "The Lost Patrol" (Amazon, iTunes, and others) Yasujiro Ozu, "There Was a Father" (Criterion Channel)


What's that drone flying in over the horizon? It's a scout from Islamic State

Los Angeles Times

Some Islamic State units have used drones to shoot propaganda footage. Although the Islamic State documents show the group has procured components to build drones, Spleeters said the group mostly relies on products from China-based DJI, the so-called Apple of the drone world, which dominates an estimated 70% of the drone market. Reports that Islamic State had used DJI products pushed the company in February to create a geofence, a software restriction that creates a no-fly zone, over large swaths of Iraq and Syria, specifically over Mosul. Iraq's Popular Mobilization Units, paramilitary factions that operate with support from Iran, regularly deploy DJI's Phantom 4 drone to scan an area for Islamic State positions and car bombs.


Michale Fee receives Fundamental Science Investigator Award

MIT News

Michale Fee, the Glen V. and Phyllis F. Dorflinger Professor in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, has received the Fundamental Science Investigator Award. Fee is the inaugural recipient of the award, which is intended to support innovative research that has the potential to advance the frontiers of basic science. Fee studies how the brain learns and generates complex sequential behaviors, with a focus on the songbird as a model system. Birdsong is a complex behavior that young birds learn by imitating their parents, and provides an ideal system to study the neural basis of learned behavior.


The Military is Using Human Brain Waves to Teach Robots How to Shoot

#artificialintelligence

Researchers from DCS Corp and the Army Research Lab fed datasets of human brain waves into a neural network -- a type of artificial intelligence -- which learned to recognize when a human is making a targeting decision. "You can train the system to do deep learning in a [highly structured] environment but if the Go game board changed dynamically over time, the AI would never be able to solve that problem. The researchers hope their new neural net will enable experiments in which a computer can easily understand when a soldier is evaluating targets in a virtual scenario, as opposed to having to spend lots of time teaching the system to understand how to structure different individuals' data, eye movements, their P300 responses, etc. The goal, one day, is a neural net that can learn instantaneously, continuously, and in real-time, by observing the brainwaves and eye movement of highly trained soldiers doing their jobs.


We could be reading minds soon: Inside the research that's moving us from sci-fi to sci-fact

#artificialintelligence

Most of them blew my mind at some point, but the one that really stuck out [dealt with] the things people are doing with reverse engineering the way the human leg works so they can build a bionic limb. There was a guy in the Army Research Office who [provided funding for Schalk's research] because he wanted to build a thought helmet that he had read about in science fiction books so that soldiers could communicate telepathically. So what they're doing is there's this program from [the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA] called Neural Engineering System Design. But Gerwin Schalk, who's working on imagined speech, believes his research is just one guidepost on route to an even grander endpoint.


Fighting online extremists with machine learning - MIT Sloan School of Management

#artificialintelligence

The two of them began discussing lines of inquiry that best integrated Marks' research ideas with Zaman's expertise in social networks. The researchers collected Twitter data on approximately 5,000 "seed users" who were either known Islamic state group members or who were connected to known Islamic state group members. When somebody returned and created a recognizable network, Zaman and Marks' algorithm then tested the similarity of the account name and profile picture against cancelled accounts to gauge the likelihood that the person under scrutiny had previously operated a suspended account. But if Islamic state group propagandists jump to other social networking sites, there is no guarantee that these companies will take it upon themselves to monitor their users; nor will companies necessarily share their data with external partners.


How artificial life spawned a billion-dollar industry

The Japan Times

Ocko, whose Data Collective firm has invested in companies including organism design firm Gingko Bioworks and bioengineer Zymergen, is not alone. This ambitious project has brought complex artificial life a big step closer because yeast is a eukaryote, an organism whose cells contain a nucleus, just like human cells. The yeast work shows how DNA can be manipulated on a large scale, with genetic code increasingly treated like a programming language in which binary 1s and 0s are replaced by DNA's four chemical building blocks, abbreviated as A, T, G, C. A growing emphasis on computing is closing the gap between biology and traditional tech, even though this is an area that remains unpredictable, variable and complex. The current product focus represents a change of tack from the first widely tipped application of synthetic biology in making biofuels from engineered algae.


How artificial life spawned a billion-dollar industry

#artificialintelligence

READ MORE: * More than 48,000 from around the world apply for a LookSee at Wellington * Wellington the idea centre of NZ's technology innovation * Artificial intelligence advances to make farming smarter * Bringing extinct animals back to life "Synthetic biology companies are now becoming more like the disruptive, industrial-scale value propositions that define any technology business," he said. Ocko, whose Data Collective firm has invested in companies including organism design firm Gingko Bioworks and bioengineer Zymergen, is not alone. This ambitious project has brought complex artificial life a big step closer because yeast is a eukaryote, an organism whose cells contain a nucleus, just like human cells. The yeast work shows how DNA can be manipulated on a large scale, with genetic code increasingly treated like a programming language in which binary 1s and 0s are replaced by DNA's four chemical building blocks, abbreviated as A, T, G, C. A growing emphasis on computing is closing the gap between biology and traditional tech, even though this is an area that remains unpredictable, variable and complex.


How Artificial Life Spawned a Billion-Dollar Industry

U.S. News

"The intersection of biology and technology is a difficult place to be because of different cultures and languages, but I think we are breaking through some of those barriers," said Thomas Bostick, former head of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers who now leads biotech firm Intrexon's environment unit.


US Army shows off its 'hoverbike' delivery drone

PCWorld

It boasts some impressive stats for carrying out such missions: The drone, dubbed the Joint Tactical Aerial Resupply Vehicle (JTARV) in military-speak, has four rotors, and can carry up to 300 pounds (130 kilograms) of material at speeds of up to 60 mph. On Jan. 10, the Army demonstrated the drone to Dr. William Roper, director of the Strategic Capabilities Office at the Office of the Secretary of Defense. A prototype of the Joint Tactical Aerial Resupply Vehicle is demonstrated at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory in Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, on January 10, 2017. A scale model of the Joint Tactical Aerial Resupply Vehicle is demonstrated to DOD Strategic Capabilities Office Director Dr. William Roper at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory in Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, on January 10, 2017.