Army


'Unpredictable' killer robots could go 'off the rails'

Daily Mail

Introducing self-governing killer robots to the battlefield could have horrific consequences for mankind, a leading academic has warned. The lethal technology is being developed around the world and is slowly being used in warfare as countries try to stay ahead of other nations. A global initiative to prohibit the use of fully autonomous killing machines that do not require any human oversight to choose and execute people was blocked earlier this year. A handful of countries including Australia, Israel, the US, Russia and South Korea prevented the worldwide ban - citing the need for further talks on the'benefits and advantages of autonomous weapons'. Richard Moyes, an honorary fellow at the University of Exeter and founding member of the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots (CSKR), has revealed the long-term use of killer robots, without human controllers, may result in unnecessary loss of life to both civilians and soldiers.


102. The Human Targeting Solution: An AI Story

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In it, CW3 Crifasi describes the inherent tension between human critical thinking and the benefits of Augmented Intelligence facilitating warfare at machine speed. "CAITT, let's re-run the targeting solution for tomorrow's engagement… again," asked Chief Warrant Officer Five Robert Menendez, in a not altogether annoyed tone of voice. Considering this was the fifth time he had asked, the tone of control Bob was exercising was nothing short of heroic for those knew him well. Fortunately, CAITT, short for Commander's Artificially Intelligent Targeting Tool, did not seem to notice. Bob quietly thanked the nameless software engineer who had not programmed it to recognize the sarcasm and vitriol that he felt when he made the request.


104. Critical Thinking: The Neglected Skill Required to Win Future Conflicts

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Many experts in education and psychology argue that critical thinking skills are declining. In 2017, Dr. Stephen Camarata wrote about the emerging crisis in critical thinking and college students' struggles to tackle real world problem solving. He emphasized the essential need for critical thinking and asserted that "a young adult whose brain has been "wired' to be innovative, think critically, and problem solve is at a tremendous competitive advantage in today's increasingly complex and competitive world."3 Although most government agencies, policy makers, and businesses deem critical thinking important, STEM fields continue to be prioritized. However, if creative thinking skills are not fused with STEM, then there will continue to be a decline in those equipped with well-rounded critical thinking abilities. In 2017, Mark Cuban opined during an interview with Bloomberg TV that the nature of work is changing and the future skill that will be more in-demand will be "creative thinking."


Pentagon looks to exoskeletons to build 'super-soldiers'

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Army is investing millions of dollars in experimental exoskeleton technology to make soldiers stronger and more resilient, in what experts say is part of a broader push into advanced gear to equip a new generation of "super-soldiers." The technology is being developed by Lockheed Martin Corp. with a license from Canada-based B-TEMIA, which first developed the exoskeletons to help people with mobility difficulties stemming from medical ailments like multiple sclerosis and severe osteoarthritis. Worn over a pair of pants, the battery-operated exoskeleton uses a suite of sensors, artificial intelligence and other technology to aid natural movements. For the U.S. military, the appeal of such technology is clear: Soldiers now deploy into war zones bogged down by heavy but critical gear like body armor, night-vision goggles and advanced radios. Altogether, that can weigh anywhere from 40 to 64 kilograms (90 to 140 pounds), when the recommended limit is just 23 kg (50 pounds).


Pentagon looks to exoskeletons to build 'super-soldiers'

Daily Mail

The U.S. Army has awarded a $6.9m contract to develop an'Iron Man' exoskeleton to give soldiers superhuman strength and endurance. Called Onyx, the battery-operated exoskeleton uses a suite of sensors, artificial intelligence and other technology to aid natural movements. It is being built by Lockheed Martin, and was originally designed to help people with mobility problems. 'It supports and boosts leg capacity for physically demanding tasks that require lifting or dragging heavy loads, holding tools or equipment, repetitive or continuous kneeling or squatting, crawling, walking long distances, walking with load, walking up or down hills, or carrying loads on stairs,' Lockheed Martin said. 'When human strength is challenged, ONYX makes the difference, reducing muscle fatigue, increasing endurance, and reducing injury.'


Microsoft wins $480 million Army contract to use Hololens goggles to 'increase lethality' in combat

Daily Mail

The U.S. Army has awarded Microsoft Corp a $479.2 million contract to supply prototypes for the Army's augmented reality systems helping soldiers in training and combat missions. It follow a major revolt from some employees who do want the the firm to work on military technology. 'Augmented reality technology will provide troops with more and better information to make decisions,' a Microsoft spokesperson said. The U.S. Army has awarded Microsoft Corp a $479.2 million contract to supply prototypes for the Army's augmented reality systems helping soldiers in training and combat missions. 'This new work extends our longstanding, trusted relationship with the DoD to this new area.'


Battlefield 2.0: How Edge Artificial Intelligence Is Setting Man Against Machine

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The control room falls silent as multiple video streams from live bodycams fill its display monitors. The windowless building, its meter-thick walls baking in the late-afternoon heat, carries no signage, no identifying markers. As the men enter, the control room displays adjust from sunlight to show a near pitch-black corridor with doorways visible to the left. The audio is silent, save for the tread of rubber boots through pooled condensation and the hum of a generator somewhere inside. The four men had seen images of the hostage before they reached the building.


The facial recognition software that could identify thousands of faces in Civil War photographs

Daily Mail

Facial recognition is being used to identify American Civil War soldiers who may have otherwise been lost in the sands of time. Computer scientist and history buff Kurt Luther created a free-to-use website, called Civil War Photo Sleuth, that uses facial recognition technology to cross-reference vintage photographs with a database and hopefully assign a name to unknown subjects. Luther was inspired to launch the website after he stumbled upon a wartime portrait of his great-great-uncle, who was a Union corporal in the Civil War. Then, the site's facial recognition technology goes to work, mapping as many as 27 'facial landmarks.' It uses those facial landmarks to compare the photo to the more than 10,000 identified photos in the site's archive.


Britain will NOT develop AI robot weapons because they are 'unethical'

Daily Mail

Britain will not develop Terminator-style machines which can kill without human command because they are unethical, the chief scientist at the Ministry of Defence said. Countries worldwide are in a new arms race to develop lethal autonomous weapons (LAWS) which can kill in a war zone without a person having to push a button. But this has sparked major fears that some countries could develop a fleet of killer robots which are not reined in by humans. Simon Cholerton, the MoD's chief scientific adviser, has revealed that Britain is'doing no work and has no plans to develop fully automated weapons'. He said that Britain will snub the new technological field even if the UK's Armed Forces are put at a disadvantage on the battlefield, because it is immoral.


Analysis of Fleet Modularity in an Artificial Intelligence-Based Attacker-Defender Game

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Because combat environments change over time and technology upgrades are widespread for ground vehicles, a large number of vehicles and equipment become quickly obsolete. A possible solution for the U.S. Army is to develop fleets of modular military vehicles, which are built by interchangeable substantial components also known as modules. One of the typical characteristics of module is their ease of assembly and disassembly through simple means such as plug-in/pull-out actions, which allows for real-time fleet reconfiguration to meet dynamic demands. Moreover, military demands are time-varying and highly stochastic because commanders keep reacting to enemy's actions. To capture these characteristics, we formulated an intelligent agent-based model to imitate decision making process during fleet operation, which combines real-time optimization with artificial intelligence. The agents are capable of inferring enemy's future move based on historical data and optimize dispatch/operation decisions accordingly. We implement our model to simulate an attacker-defender game between two adversarial and intelligent players, representing the commanders from modularized fleet and conventional fleet respectively. Given the same level of combat resources and intelligence, we highlight the tactical advantages of fleet modularity in terms of win rate, unpredictability and suffered damage.