Army


Niger to let U.S. forces arm drones against jihadis

The Japan Times

NIAMEY – Niger will allow U.S. forces stationed in the country to arm the drones being used to track jihadis, having previously allowed their use only for surveillance, the government said Saturday. The decision comes a month after jihadis ambushed a joint U.S.-Niger patrol in a volatile area near the border with Mali, killing four American soldiers and four Nigerien troops. But Defense Minister Kalla Moutari said the decision had been taken before the Oct. 4 attack at Tongo Tongo. "It was a negotiation that had been under way for a while. Arming the drones is an option we decided on before we learned of the tragedy at Tongo Tongo," Moutari told state radio.


Almost all American ISIS fighters unaccounted for, sparking fears they could slip through cracks and return

FOX News

'White Widow' Sally Jones reportedly killed in U.S. drone strike; Trace Gallagher reports from Los Angeles. When it came to recruiting foreigners to flee the comforts of home for the battlefields of Iraq and Syria, ISIS succeeded like no other -- encouraging more than 40,000 fighters from more than 110 countries to travel to the fighting fray both before and after the declaration of the "caliphate" in June 2014. Subsequently, authorities have warned about the threat of returning jihadists to their homeland and since the falls of Mosul, Raqqa and the rapidly receding footprint of ISIS, such fears have come to the forefront. According to a new report, "Beyond the Caliphate: Foreign Fighters and the Threat of Returnees," released this week by the Soufan Center -- a Washington-based security intelligence consultancy -- there are now at least 5,600 citizens or residents from 33 countries who have returned home -- accounting for about 15 percent of the fighters. FILE - In this file picture taken on Friday, July 21, 2017, Kurdish soldiers from the Anti-Terrorism Units, carry a blindfolded an Indonesian man suspected of Islamic State membership, at a security center, in Kobani, Syria.


India Warily Eyes AI

MIT Technology Review

Two days after K.S. Sunil Kumar received a promotion, Human Resources phoned him up and asked him to resign. This happened in April, just as Kumar was beginning his ninth year at Tech Mahindra, one of the giants in India's IT services industry. He worked in engineering services, where he designed components and tools for aerospace firms in North America and Europe. They'd send over specs--the materials available to construct a hinge, and the kind of load it had to bear, and the cost at which it had to be manufactured--and he mocked up options with the help of software. He was a foot soldier in the army of Indian engineers to whom work is outsourced from the West, so that it can be finished at a fraction of the expense.


Putin Predicts Superhuman Soldiers Will Be Worse Than Nuclear Bombs

International Business Times

Russian president Vladimir Putin wanted world leaders to have regulations in store for superhuman soldiers in the future in case they turn in to mass killers who feel no pain or fear, The Express reported Monday. The statement came after he warned attendees of the "World Festival of Youth and Students" Saturday. Genetically-modified superhuman soldiers are a possible danger, because scientists are close to breaking the genetic code. "He can be a genius mathematician, a brilliant musician or a soldier, a man who can fight without fear, compassion, regret or pain," Putin said in his speech for the festival's closing ceremony, according to Express. "What I have just described might be worse than a nuclear bomb," Putin proclaimed, in front of the 20,000 young women and men attending the festival, which was held in the Olympic Park in Sochi.


Vladimir Putin warns about super-human soldiers in future

Daily Mail

Genetically-modified superhuman soldiers'worse than a nuclear bomb' could soon become a reality, according to Russian President, Vladimir Putin. Speaking at a youth festival this week, Putin claimed that an army of trained killers could be created if scientists play with man's genetic code. Putin suggested that world leaders should agree on strict regulation to prevent the creation of mass-killing soldiers who feel no pain or fear. Genetically-modified super soldiers'worse than a nuclear bomb' could soon become a reality, according to Russian President, Vladimir Putin Putin warned that messing with the genetic code could have serious consequences. He said: 'One may imagine that a man can create a man not only theoretically but also practically.


Ukraine demonstrates new armed ground robot

Daily Mail

Ukrainian military officials have unveiled an adaptable war robot that can switch up its mode of travel, and even the type of weapons it carries. Ukrainian military officials have unveiled an adaptable war robot that can switch up its mode of travel, and even the type of weapons it carries. Phantom, also sometimes referred to as Fantom, can drive up to 20 kilometers (12.4 miles) at a time, at a maximum speed of 38 kilometers per hour. Phantom, also sometimes referred to as Fantom, can drive up to 20 kilometers (12.4 miles) at a time, at a maximum speed of 38 kilometers per hour.


AUSA 2017: This military ATV can 'think' and drive itself

FOX News

While top brass walked the floors of AUSA exploring innovation for future combat in Washington D.C., in Georgia at Fort Benning, robot selection to join the troops is in an intense final week. The jungle drums at AUSA have it that the selected robots may be integrating and working alongside soldiers in brigade combat teams (BCTs) as soon as early next year. In fact, U.S. special operations forces and the wider military regularly rely on the advanced capabilities MRZR 2 and MRZR 4 for their work downrange. The company teamed up with robot experts Applied Research Associates and Neya Systems to turn their wildly popular MRZR into the MRZR X – a smart MRZR that integrates advanced robotics so it can drive without a human at the wheel.


Who Is Sally Jones? ISIS Member 'White Widow' Allegedly Killed In Syria

International Business Times

Sally Jones, a former punk rocker from Kent, United Kingdom, who gained notoriety as "Mrs Terror" after joining the Islamic State group (also called ISIS), was reportedly killed in a United States drone strike along with her 12-year old son Jojo in Syria as she tried to escape Raqqa, the Sun reported. Though Whitehall sources confirmed reports that Jones was killed, according to the Guardian, the Pentagon was unable to confirm the news. Jones collected another nickname -- White Widow --after Hussain was killed by a U.S. army drone in IS group capital of Raqqa in 2015. Metro reported that in a Twitter post after Hussain's death, Jones claimed she was "proud my husband was killed by the biggest enemy of Allah, may Allah be pleased with him."


Raytheon Unveils a Drone-Killing, Laser-Firing Dune Buggy

WIRED

The system uses a high-energy laser coupled with a targeting system adapted from Raytheon's Multi-spectral Targeting System (MTS), which combines optical and infrared sensors to acquire and track airborne targets, and direct the beam it fires. For the anti-drone role, Raytheon modified the system's ability to track types of drones preferred by terrorist organizations--Class 1 drones under 20 pounds and Class 2 drones, between 20 and 55 pounds. Right now, the buggy has to stop before firing, but Raytheon's engineers are working on versions that can shoot on the move. Though a relatively modest application compared to, say, shooting lasers from Apache helicopters swooping into battlefields, the whole setup--dubbed the HELWS MRZR, based on the high-energy laser configuration and the name of the buggy--is indicative of how Raytheon sees the future of warfare.