Army


US Army reveals video of laser weapon shooting down drones

Daily Mail

Athena uses Lockheed Martin's company's 30-kW Accelerated Laser Demonstration Initiative (ALADIN). Army bosses hope the radical weapon will give protection against threats such as swarms of drones or large numbers of rockets and mortars. Athena uses Lockheed Martin's company's 30-kilowatt Accelerated Laser Demonstration Initiative (ALADIN) to optimize efficiency and lethality, according to the firm. Athena uses Lockheed Martin's company's 30-kilowatt Accelerated Laser Demonstration Initiative (ALADIN) to optimize efficiency and lethality, according to the firm Army bosses hope the radical weapon will give protection against threats such as swarms of drones or large numbers of rockets and mortars.


Multi-million pound Army drones lost over sea

BBC News

Two multi-million pound British Army drones crashed after taking off from a base in mid Wales, the Ministry of Defence has confirmed. The unmanned Watchkeeper aircraft were lost in the Irish Sea earlier this year, leading commanders to temporarily ground the entire fleet. Delays have been blamed on technical and safety issues and a lack of trained personnel. Harry Rogers, who runs Drones Campaign Network Cymru, is concerned about their safety.


Islamic State's latest video features what it says is a child of a U.S. soldier

Los Angeles Times

Islamic State's slick propaganda videos have long included children, but its latest offering purports to show something different: an American child and supposed son of a U.S. soldier threatening President Trump. "My father is an American soldier who fought the mujahideen [holy warriors] in Iraq," Yousef, speaking with an American accent, says to the camera. He says he is in Raqqa, Islamic State's de facto Syrian capital. Heather Nauert, a U.S. State Department spokesman, said at a press briefing Wednesday that she could not confirm that the child was an American.. "First and foremost, any child used in that capacity in an ISIS video, regardless of what is being done, is sick," said Nauert, referring to Islamic State by one of its acronyms.


We can't ban killer robots – it's already too late Philip Ball

#artificialintelligence

One response to the call by experts in robotics and artificial intelligence for an ban on "killer robots" ("lethal autonomous weapons systems" or Laws in the language of international treaties) is to say: shouldn't you have thought about that sooner? There are shades of science-fictional preconceptions in a 2012 report on killer robots by Human Rights Watch. Besides, there's a continuum between drone war, soldier enhancement technologies and Laws that can't be broken down into "man versus machine". By all means let's try to curb our worst impulses to beat ploughshares into swords, but telling an international arms trade that they can't make killer robots is like telling soft-drinks manufacturers that they can't make orangeade.


Self healing skin brings Terminator robots one step closer

Daily Mail

Now experts have created a synthetic skin that aims to mimic nature's self-repairing abilities, allowing robots to recover from'wounds' sustained while undertaking their duties. Now experts have created a synthetic skin (pictured on robotic hand) that aims to mimic nature's self-repairing abilities To create their synthetic flesh, the scientists used jelly-like polymers that melt into each together when heated and then cooled. Their flexibility allows them to be used for a wide variety of applications, from grabbing delicate and soft objects in the food industry to performing minimally invasive surgery. The flexibility of these soft robots allows them to be used for a wide variety of applications, from grabbing delicate and soft objects in the food industry (pictured) to performing minimally invasive surgery.


US Army and Navy ordered to halt use of DJI drones

Robohub

The Army's move appears to follow studies conducted by the Army Research Laboratory and the Navy which said there were risks and vulnerabilities in DJI products. The directive cites a classified Army Research Laboratory report and a Navy memo, as references for the order to cease use of DJI drones and related equipment. Some recent news stories have claimed DJI routinely shares customer information and drone video with authorities in China, where DJI is headquartered. We want to emphasize that DJI does not routinely share customer information or drone video with Chinese authorities -- or any authorities Any claims to the contrary are false.


DJI: U.S. Army Won't Say Why It Banned Our Drones, Products

International Business Times

The memo cited a classified report, "DJI UAS Technology Threat and User Vulnerabilities," and a U.S. Navy memo, "Operational Risks with Regards to DJI Family of Products." The rule also applies to other items from the company, including flight computers, cameras, radios, batteries, speed controllers, GPS units, handheld control stations, and devices with DJI software applications installed. "We can confirm that guidance was issued," the U.S. Army told International Business Times on Tuesday, "however, we are currently reviewing the guidance and cannot comment further at this time." Others have expressed privacy concerns regarding data collection, as reports claimed DJI shared information with Chinese authorities, a claim the company has disputed.


Army Bans DJI Drones, Citing Security Concerns

WIRED

It's unclear what data DJI can access without customer consent, but location and media data from an Army drone could potentially reveal extensive information about US military operations. Even if the Army isn't specifically concerned about DJI or the Chinese government accessing this data, it may be worried that other parties could intercept any data linked to DJI. The guidance points to two US military reports, one from the Army Research Laboratory titled "DJI UAS Technology Threat and User Vulnerabilities" and one from the Navy called "Operational Risks with Regards to DJI Family of Products." DJI has said in the past that it doesn't track devices, and can't access unit audio or video feeds.


U.S. Army halts use of Chinese-made drones over 'cyber vulnerabilities'

The Japan Times

The memo says DJI drones are the most widely used by the army among off-the-shelf equipment of that type. Goldman analysts estimated the market, including military, to be worth more than $100 billion over the next five years. The move appears to follow studies conducted by the Army Research Laboratory and the navy that said there were risks and vulnerabilities in DJI products. The memo cites a classified Army Research Laboratory report and a navy memo, both from May as references for the order to cease use of DJI drones and related equipment.


U.S. Army Orders Units To Stop Using DJI Drones Over Concerns

International Business Times

The Army Aviation Engineering Directorate has issued over 300 separate Airworthiness Releases for DJI products in support of multiple organisations with a variety of mission sets. The Army ordered its units to halt the use of DJI products, including all of the company's unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). The Department of the Army memo even reports that they have'issued over 300 separate Airworthiness Releases for DJI products in support of multiple organizations with a variety of mission sets.' Others have expressed privacy concerns regarding data collection, as reports claimed DJI shared information with Chinese authorities.