Wind


Amazon's Jeff Bezos smashes champagne bottle on turbine

Daily Mail

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos has'christened' the company's new wind farm by smashing a bottle of champagne while standing on top of a 300ft (90m) turbine. Footage of the stunt, which appears to have been recorded using a drone, gives a sweeping look of the new Texan wind farm which is currently Amazon's largest renewable energy project. The 53-year-old multi-billionaire flaunted the bottle-smashing video on Twitter - further shaping his new macho appearance which is a far cry from his nerdy look when he started Amazon in the mid-90s. Bezos' macho appearance is a far cry from his nerdy look when he started Amazon in the mid-90s. At the time, he was running it from a garage at a house he had rented in Seattle.


[slides] #MachineLearning and #CognitiveComputing @CloudExpo #AI #ML

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Machine Learning helps make complex systems more efficient. By applying advanced Machine Learning techniques such as Cognitive Fingerprinting, wind project operators can utilize these tools to learn from collected data, detect regular patterns, and optimize their own operations. In his session at 18th Cloud Expo, Stuart Gillen, Director of Business Development at SparkCognition, discussed how research has demonstrated the value of Machine Learning in delivering next generation analytics to improve safety, performance, and reliability in today's modern wind turbines. Speaker Bio Stuart Gillen is the Director of Business Development at SparkCognition. In this role, he is responsible for driving business engagements, partner development, marketing activities, and go-to market strategy.


Drone-scale computing: Streaming AI across the IoT nervous system will power the future - IoT Agenda

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A system of insight is like your human nervous system: AI is the brain, IoT sensors are your senses, middleware is your skeletal system and streaming analytics complete the autonomous nervous system's function. The Vestas implementation captures terabytes of sensory input each and every day from its wind turbines to continuously train algorithms that continuously instruct turbines on how to react to wind and atmospheric conditions and optimize power production. Streaming analytics of trained algorithms provide this automatic intelligence in action for IoT systems and guide delivery drones to, say, avoid collision with one another. All automated IoT systems face this challenge, as the importance of a connected business nervous system makes for a big target.


Artificially Intelligent Green Energy? Yes!

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Smart Wind and Solar Power Big data and artificial intelligence are producing ultra-accurate forecasts that will make it feasible to integrate much more renewable energy into the power grid. Researchers around the world are collecting wind speed and output data from wind turbines. The result: wind power forecasts of unprecedented accuracy are making it possible to use far more renewable energy, at lower cost, than utilities ever thought possible. While solar power generation lags wind power production, researchers are furiously working around the world to better harness the sun's abundant power.


GE's research scientists are learning to meld AI with machines

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So far, nearly 400 employees from across the company have completed GE's certification program for data analytics, and about 50 scientists have moved into digital analytics jobs of the kind Nichols has taken on. They enable GE to track wear and tear on its aircraft engines, locomotives, gas turbines, and wind turbines using sensor data instead of assumptions or estimates, making it easier to predict when they will need maintenance. What's more, if data is corrupted or missing, the company fills in the gaps with the aid of machine learning, a type of AI that lets computers learn without being explicitly programmed, says Colin Parris, GE Global Research's vice president for software research. Parris says GE pairs computer vision with deep learning, a type of AI particularly adept at recognizing patterns, and reinforcement learning, another recent advance in AI that enables machines to optimize operations, to enable cameras to find minute cracks on metal turbine blades even when they are dirty and dusty.


General Electric Builds An Ai Workforce MIT Technology Review Stage Fright Media

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So far, nearly 400 employees from across the company have completed GE's certification program for data analytics, and about 50 scientists have moved into digital analytics jobs of the kind Nichols has taken on. They enable GE to track wear and tear on its aircraft engines, locomotives, gas turbines, and wind turbines using sensor data instead of assumptions or estimates, making it easier to predict when they will need maintenance. What's more, if data is corrupted or missing, the company fills in the gaps with the aid of machine learning, a type of AI that lets computers learn without being explicitly programmed, says Colin Parris, GE Global Research's vice president for software research. Parris says GE pairs computer vision with deep learning, a type of AI particularly adept at recognizing patterns, and reinforcement learning, another recent advance in AI that enables machines to optimize operations, to enable cameras to find minute cracks on metal turbine blades even when they are dirty and dusty.


Artificial Intelligence and Robots to Make Offshore Windfarms Safer and Cheaper

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The University of Manchester is leading a consortium to investigate advanced technologies, including robotics and artificial intelligence, for the operation and maintenance of offshore windfarms. The £5m project will investigate the use of advanced sensing, robotics, virtual reality models and artificial intelligence to reduce maintenance cost and effort. Robots and advanced sensors will be used to minimise the need for human intervention in the hazardous offshore environment. The use of robots will allow operation in difficult or hazardous environments: sub-sea to inspect cables, in high-voltage environments to inspect high voltage equipment and around the wind turbines to check their mechanical structures.


Artificial intelligence and robots to make offshore windfarms safer and cheaper

#artificialintelligence

The University of Manchester is leading a consortium to investigate advanced technologies, including robotics and artificial intelligence, for the operation and maintenance of offshore windfarms. The £5m project will investigate the use of advanced sensing, robotics, virtual reality models and artificial intelligence to reduce maintenance cost and effort. Robots and advanced sensors will be used to minimise the need for human intervention in the hazardous offshore environment. The use of robots will allow operation in difficult or hazardous environments: sub-sea to inspect cables, in high-voltage environments to inspect high voltage equipment and around the wind turbines to check their mechanical structures.


Smart Forecasts Lower the Power of Wind and Solar

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Mining these detailed forecasts to develop a more flexible and efficient electricity system could make it much cheaper to hit ambitious international goals for reducing carbon emissions, says Bryan Hannegan, director of a $135 million facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, that uses supercomputer simulations to develop ways to scale up renewable power. No one is more aware of the challenges of integrating wind power into the grid than Dayton Jones, a power plant dispatcher for Xcel Energy. Running backup fossil-fuel plants means "throwing carbon up into the sky": "It costs money, and it's bad for the environment." The red line--the result of subtracting wind power supply (blue) from demand (black)--shows the amount of power Xcel needs to generate with its fossil-fuel plants.


Five technologies that will change how we live

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The most radical branch of this new technology is "gene editing" -- a process by which our DNA code can be cut and pasted using molecular "scissors" for a variety of applications, including curing diseases such as cancers and HIV. Keeping this promise will require more renewable energy research over the next decade. Other innovations include artificial photosynthesis to make hydrocarbons in laboratories to power cars, and high-altitude wind power that involves kites and hot-air balloons acting as aerial wind turbines. Now, the entire country's electricity and heating systems are powered almost fully by renewable energy, including geothermal and hydropower.