School Violence


Schools are using facial recognition to try to stop shootings. Here's why they should think twice.

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For years, the Denver public school system worked with Video Insight, a Houston-based video management software company that centralized the storage of video footage used across its campuses. So when Panasonic acquired Video Insight, school officials simply transferred the job of updating and expanding their security system to the Japanese electronics giant. That meant new digital HD cameras and access to more powerful analytics software, including Panasonic's facial recognition, a tool the public school system's safety department is now exploring. Denver, where some activists are pushing for a ban on government use of facial recognition, is not alone. Mass shootings have put school administrators across the country on edge, and they're understandably looking at anything that might prevent another tragedy.


Veterans demonstrate artificial intelligence to stop active shooters before shots are fired

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A group of veterans inspired by the need to keep schools and public spaces safer have created a new technology they say can detect guns and send out alerts before shots are ever fired. Active shooter situations have played out across the country โ€“ a gunman opened fire inside a Florida high school, shots rang out at a Texas Walmart and multiple people were shot to death in an office building in Virginia Beach. The nation's most recent school shooting happened Thursday morning โ€“ when a 16-year-old high school student in Santa Clarita, California, opened fire in the campus quad, shooting five classmates and killing two. What if the gun was detected early โ€“ so early, the shooter was never able to get inside to hurt anyone? The technology to do that exists, and only WUSA9 was there when it was tested in Northern Virginia.


Under digital surveillance: how American schools spy on millions of kids

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For Adam Jasinski, a technology director for a school district outside of St Louis, Missouri, monitoring student emails used to be a time-consuming job. Jasinski used to do keyword searches of the official school email accounts for the district's 2,600 students, looking for words like "suicide" or "marijuana". Then he would have to read through every message that included one of the words. The process would occasionally catch some concerning behavior, but "it was cumbersome", Jasinski recalled. Last year Jasinski heard about a new option: following the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, the technology company Bark was offering schools free, automated, 24-hour-a-day surveillance of what students were writing in their school emails, shared documents and chat messages, and sending alerts to school officials any time the monitoring technology flagged concerning phrases.


Blaming video games for school shootings may reflect racist beliefs, study says

Daily Mail - Science & tech

People have long blamed video games as a cause of school shootings, but a new study has found that this is more likely to be the case if the perpetrator is white. Researchers have found that video games are eight times more likely to be mentioned when the perpetrator was a white male than if the shooter were an African American male. Experts believe the public looks to find an explanation for this type of behavior if the act is carried out by someone who doesn't match the racial stereotype of a violent person. Although many politicians and media outlets point to violent video games as the cause of school shootings, experts have yet to find scientific evidence to support these claims. 'Video games are often used by lawmakers and others as a red herring to distract from other potential causes of school shootings,' said lead researcher Patrick Markey, PhD, a psychology professor at Villanova University.


Artificial-intelligence voice is used in a theft - The Washington Post

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The request was "rather strange," the director noted later in an email, but the voice was so lifelike that he felt he had no choice but to comply. The insurer, whose case was first reported by the Wall Street Journal, provided new details on the theft to The Washington Post on Wednesday, including an email from the employee tricked by what the insurer is referring to internally as "the false Johannes." Now being developed by a wide range of Silicon Valley titans and AI start-ups, such voice-synthesis software can copy the rhythms and intonations of a person's voice and be used to produce convincing speech. Tech giants such as Google and smaller firms such as the "ultrarealistic voice cloning" start-up Lyrebird have helped refine the resulting fakes and made the tools more widely available free for unlimited use. But the synthetic audio and AI-generated videos, known as "deepfakes," have fueled growing anxieties over how the new technologies can erode public trust, empower criminals and make traditional communication -- business deals, family phone calls, presidential campaigns -- that much more vulnerable to computerized manipulation.


Aegis AI Software Detects Gun Threats And Provides Real-Time Alerts

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During the Parkland, Florida, school shooting in 2018, the shooter was caught on a security camera pulling his rifle out of a duffle bag in the staircase 15 seconds before discharging the first round. However, the School Resource Officer didn't enter the building because he wasn't confident about the situation, and the Coral Springs Police Department had no idea what the shooter even looked like until 7 minutes and 30 seconds after the first round was fired. If the video system had included technology to recognize the gun threat in real time, alerts could have been sent to the security team. An announcement could have been made right away for all students and faculty in Building 12 to barricade their doors, and law enforcement could have responded a lot faster to a real-time feed of timely and accurate information. Aegis AI offers such a technology, which the company says enables existing security cameras to automatically recognize gun threats and notify security in real-time.


An artificial-intelligence first: Voice-mimicking software reportedly used in a major theft

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Thieves used voice-mimicking software to imitate a company executive's speech and dupe his subordinate into sending hundreds of thousands of dollars to a secret account, the company's insurer said, in a remarkable case that some researchers are calling one of the world's first publicly reported artificial-intelligence heists. The managing director of a British energy company, believing his boss was on the phone, followed orders one Friday afternoon in March to wire more than $240,000 to an account in Hungary, said representatives from the French insurance giant Euler Hermes, which declined to name the company. The request was "rather strange," the director noted later in an email, but the voice was so lifelike that he felt he had no choice but to comply. The insurer, whose case was first reported by the Wall Street Journal, provided new details on the theft to The Washington Post on Wednesday, including an email from the employee tricked by what the insurer is referring to internally as "the false Johannes." Now being developed by a wide range of Silicon Valley titans and AI start-ups, such voice-synthesis software can copy the rhythms and intonations of a person's voice and be used to produce convincing speech.


Artificial Intelligence Firearm Detection For K-12 Schools and Colleges

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By routing your camera feeds to our AI Engine, you can be informed in just 3 seconds when a firearm is detected in surveillance cameras. Additionally, this AI technology can track shooters in real time, providing shooter location(s) and fast live updates to police, school security and educators. In the wake of school shooting incidents over the past 10 years, people are anxious about creating safe environments. The ability to detect weapons on premises is unfortunately a necessity now. Cameras are already in place at most schools.


ESPN Delays Broadcast of Video Game Tournament After Mass Shootings

TIME - Tech

Disney's ESPN has chosen not to broadcast a recent video-game competition -- one that features gun violence -- in the wake of last weekend's mass shootings in Texas and Ohio, according to a person familiar with the plans. ESPN is delaying its planned Aug. 10 broadcast of a recent tournament for Apex Legends, a popular battle royale game made by publisher Electronic Arts Inc., the person said, asking not to be identified as the matter is internal. The decision comes in the wake of the two shootings that prompted politicians, including President Donald Trump, to say video games that glorify violence could be contributing to the country's shooting epidemic. ESPN2 will air the taped segment on three nights in October, according to the person. It will still be available this weekend on ESPN's digital channels, including its app.


How former Navy SEALs use artificial intelligence to make schools safer Video NJTV News

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Dustin is posing as an active shooter armed with an assault rifle. If he thinks he's undetected looking to prey on the unsuspecting, he'd be completely wrong. We've tested a couple different model architectures and we use that over existing security cameras using different types of GPUs to be able to digest those video feeds, run analytics over it looking for a weapon and then sending the alert out," said Mike Lahiff, CEO of ZeroEyes. The alert goes out in a flash to law enforcers and administrators with video of Dustin's movements and location. "Instantly, I would get on my police radio and notify first responders that I have a possible threat on location.