Health & Safety


US drone strike kills Pakistani Taliban leader who ordered Malala Yousafzai assassination, Afghanistan says

FOX News

Nov. 7, 2013: Pakistani Taliban leader Mullah Fazlullah is seen on television at a coffee shop in Islamabad. The Pakistani Taliban leader known for beheading police officers and even ordering the assassination of Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai has been killed by a U.S. drone strike, Afghanistan's Defense Ministry says. Mohammad Radmanish told the Associated Press on Friday that Mullah Fazlullah, the ruthless insurgent leader, died along with two other terrorists a day earlier in the Marawara district along the Afghanistan-Pakistan border. A statement attributed to U.S. Forces-Afghanistan spokesman Lt. Col Martin O'Donnell said an American "counterterrorism strike" was carried out in the region targeting "a senior leader of a designated terrorist organization," but did not say whether it had killed anyone. Fazlullah previously ordered the bombing and beheadings of dozens of opponents when his band of insurgents controlled Pakistan's picturesque Swat Valley from 2007 until a massive military operation routed them in 2009.


Watch Parkland students' emotional Tonys performance and cry

Mashable

Students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, the site of a brutal February shooting, performed "Seasons of Love" from Rent at Sunday's Tony Awards. Their theatre teacher Melody Herzfeld was named the recipient of the 2018 Excellence in Theatre Education Award. Survivors of the school shooting in Parkland, Fl. galvanized many Americans to fight actively for gun control, including with March For Our Lives. In April, several students were included in the Time 100 and were written about by Barack Obama. Many among the Tonys' elite Broadway audience were moved to tears by the performance and the song's message of choosing love over the many negative sentiments the world has to offer.


Facial-recognition companies target schools, promising an end to shootings

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The facial-recognition cameras installed near the bounce houses at the Warehouse, an after-school recreation center in Bloomington, Indiana, are aimed low enough to scan the face of every parent, teenager and toddler who walks in. The center's director, David Weil, learned earlier this year of the surveillance system from a church newsletter, and within six weeks he had bought his own, believing it promised a security breakthrough that was both affordable and cutting-edge. Since last month, the system has logged thousands of visitors' faces – alongside their names, phone numbers and other personal details – and checked them against a regularly updated blacklist of sex offenders and unwanted guests. The system's Israeli developer, Face-Six, also promotes it for use in prisons and drones. "Some parents still think it's kind of '1984,' " said Weil, whose 21-month-old granddaughter is among the scanned.


Terror-Stopping Artificial Intelligence Coming to American High School

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Just last week, the CEO of this company announced that this system will be installed, for the first time ever, in an American high school and an American university. The names of the institutions have not been made public for obvious reasons, but in these pilot programs for this disruptive new technology, the exposure to real-world environments will serve to further hone and refine the algorithms. Why not just start installing them everywhere, you might ask? The reason is simple: Given the sensitive nature of this technology and the panic a false alarm may bring (just imagine a SWAT team rushing to the scene), it is of utmost importance that the algorithms are as refined as possible before a mass rollout can be effected. And there's nothing besides natural environment exposure that can do that. Think of machine learning as no different than human learning. You need constant stimulus from a variety of seemingly chaotic environmental factors for true artificial intelligence to be achieved.


Artificial Intelligence system can predict school violence - The Financial Express

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Scientists have developed an artificial intelligence system that can help predict which students are at higher risk of perpetrating school violence. The researchers found that machine learning – the science of getting computers to learn over time without human intervention – is as accurate as a team of child and adolescent psychiatrists, including a forensic psychiatrist, in determining risk for school violence. "Previous violent behaviour, impulsivity, school problems and negative attitudes were correlated with risk to others," said Drew Barzman, a child forensic psychiatrist at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center in the US. "Our risk assessments were focused on predicting any type of physical aggression at school. We did not gather outcome data to assess whether machine learning could actually help prevent school violence.


Pilot Study Validates Artificial Intelligence to Help Predict School Violence

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School violence has increased over the past ten years. This study evaluated students using a more standard and sensitive method to help identify students who are at high risk for school violence. Participants (ages 12–18) were active students in 74 traditional schools (i.e. Collateral information was gathered from guardians before participants were evaluated. School risk evaluations were performed with each participant, and audio recordings from the evaluations were later transcribed and manually annotated.


Artificial intelligence may be useful in predicting school violence, study shows

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A pilot study indicates that artificial intelligence may be useful in predicting which students are at higher risk of perpetrating school violence.


Pilot study validates artificial intelligence to help predict school violence

#artificialintelligence

The researchers found that machine learning -- the science of getting computers to learn over time without human intervention -- is as accurate as a team of child and adolescent psychiatrists, including a forensic psychiatrist, in determining risk for school violence. "Previous violent behavior, impulsivity, school problems and negative attitudes were correlated with risk to others," says Drew Barzman, MD, a child forensic psychiatrist at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and lead author of the study. "Our risk assessments were focused on predicting any type of physical aggression at school. We did not gather outcome data to assess whether machine learning could actually help prevent school violence. That is our next goal."


The Web's Recommendation Engines Are Broken. Can We Fix Them?

WIRED

Today, recommendation engines are perhaps the biggest threat to societal cohesion on the internet--and, as a result, one of the biggest threats to societal cohesion in the offline world, too. The recommendation engines we engage with are broken in ways that have grave consequences: amplified conspiracy theories, gamified news, nonsense infiltrating mainstream discourse, misinformed voters. Recommendation engines have become The Great Polarizer. Ironically, the conversation about recommendation engines, and the curatorial power of social giants, is also highly polarized. A creator showed up at YouTube's offices with a gun last week, outraged that the platform had demonetized and downranked some of the videos on her channel.


Can You Imagine How AI Has Already Changed Your Life? The Political Side of Things

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Some state colleges in California are apparently not impressed by the Parkland high school shooting survivor who helped become a voice for a global gun control movement. David Hogg, 17, has so far been rejected by four University of California campuses -- UCLA, UCSD, UCSB and UC Irvine, he told TMZ. According to the UC site, a minimum 3.4 GPA is required for non-California residents to get in. The Florida teen has a 4.2 GPA and an SAT score of 1270. "At this point, we're already changing the world," Hogg, a senior at Stoneman Douglas High School, told the outlet.