Continuing Education


Using Design Slam to Foster Lifelong Learning Solutions

IEEE Computer

An architecture firm used the hackathon model to design spaces that integrate lifelong learning with other aspects of our daily lives, such as working, playing, and socializing.


Artificial Intelligence & Education: Lifelong Learning Dialogue Toru Iiyoshi TEDxKyotoUniversity

#artificialintelligence

In this talk, Prof. Iiyoshi goes head to head with an AI questioning the fate of education and lifelong learning! Toru Iiyoshi was previously a senior scholar and Director of the Knowledge Media Laboratory at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching (1999-2008), and Senior Strategist in the Office of Educational Innovation and Technology at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2009-2011). He is the co-editor of the Carnegie Foundation book, "Opening Up Education: The Collective Advancement of Education through Open Technology, Open Content, and Open Knowledge" (MIT Press, 2008) and co-author of three books including "The Art of Multimedia: Design and Development of The Multimedia Human Body" and numerous academic and commercial articles. He received the Outstanding Practice Award in Instructional Development and the Robert M. Gagne Award for Research in Instructional Design from the Association for Educational Communications and Technology.


Lifelong learning a hallmark of MIT pursuits

MIT News

On July 27, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor Philip Gschwend presented on environmental topics to approximately 75 MIT alumni in Mashpee, Massachusetts. Korelitz then introduced Gschwend, the Ford Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and director of the Ralph M. Parsons Laboratory for Environmental Science and Engineering, who spoke on the topic: "Environmental Pollution: Do Our Remedial Solutions Solve the Problems?" Gschwend explained that this solution was insufficient, however, because it was discovered that it is not only hydrocarbon emissions causing the high concentration of ozone, but also nitrogen oxide emissions. President and webmaster of the class of 1956, and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering alumnus, Ralph Kohl said he "very much enjoyed" the day, and found Gschwend to be "very lively," adding "I can only imagine what his exams would be like!"


It's time to move beyond the 4-year degree

Los Angeles Times

With a bachelor's degree now the must-have job credential, pressure is mounting to find ways to make college more affordable. Most proposals to improve access for low-income students focus on tweaking the financial aid system. But what's required instead is a complete overhaul of what we mean by... With a bachelor's degree now the must-have job credential, pressure is mounting to find ways to make college more affordable. Most proposals to improve access for low-income students focus on tweaking the financial aid system.


Report 83-47.pdf

Classics (Collection 2)

An alternate model would bring the computer into the physician's practice in an integrated fashion coupled to the management of specific patients We might imagine the computer functioning as a consultant rather than as an educator Any physician will acknowledge the educational benefits of a consultation from an articulate colleague with expertise in another area of medicine; computers serving as consultants in specialized problem areas might play a similar educational function. Thus, although computer-based consultations offer exciting potential for continuing medical education, there are significant barrier; that must be overcome before the promise can be realized. Our group recently studied the opinions of practicing physicians and medical school faculty towards the development and implementation of consultation systems [11]. We also studied the physicians' demands regarding desirable features for such systems if they are to be useful and clinically accepted; the resulting design considerations highlight 4 performance capabili--ies that are a challenge to medical computer scientists.


Report 83-47.pdf

Classics (Collection 2)

An alternate model would bring the computer into the physician's practice in an integrated fashion coupled to the management of specific patients We might imagine the computer functioning as a consultant rather than as an educator Any physician will acknowledge the educational benefits of a consultation from an articulate colleague with expertise in another area of medicine; computers serving as consultants in specialized problem areas might play a similar educational function. Thus, although computer-based consultations offer exciting potential for continuing medical education, there are significant barrier; that must be overcome before the promise can be realized. Our group recently studied the opinions of practicing physicians and medical school faculty towards the development and implementation of consultation systems [11]. We also studied the physicians' demands regarding desirable features for such systems if they are to be useful and clinically accepted; the resulting design considerations highlight 4 performance capabili--ies that are a challenge to medical computer scientists.