Mathematics


HappyNumbers uses AI to augment math teachers, not replace them Future of Learning

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The e-learning or digital content ecosystem is quickly evolving, and mobile learning, multi-device content, mobile responsive content (call it what you will) is here to stay. #1: Define What "Mobile" Means to You--and Your Clients Mobile learning can be defined as many different types of learning experiences. #2: Decide on a Minimum Device Set Once you are clear on what mobile learning and mobile responsive mean to you, you are in a better position to decide on a minimum device set. #3: Understand Your New Design Parameters The good news: It's finally time to say goodbye to fixed screen, click-next, sleep-inducing e-learning content! #4: Adjust Your Storyboarding Process If you've been an instructional designer as long as I have, you'll have experimented with different types of storyboarding. For me, Microsoft PowerPoint works the best. Example #5: Integrate Scrolling into the Design Process If you are not careful, your instructional designers will simply transfer their fixed screen design ideas into long scrolling pages.


Wolfram Alpha Is Making It Extremely Easy for Students to Cheat

WIRED

Denise Garcia knows that her students sometimes cheat, but the situation she unearthed in February seemed different. A math teacher in West Hartford, Connecticut, Garcia had accidentally included an advanced equation in a problem set for her AP Calculus class. Yet somehow a handful of students in the 15-person class solved it correctly. Those students had also shown their work, defeating the traditional litmus test for sussing out cheating in STEM classrooms. Garcia was perplexed, until she remembered a conversation from a few years earlier.


Machine passes EM gaokao /EM math test - China - Chinadaily.com.cn

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A smart machine made by a company in Chengdu, Sichuan province, took the math test of the national college entrance examination, or gaokao, on Wednesday. AI-MATHS finished the paper version of the test for liberal arts students in Beijing with a score of 105. A full score was 150. "The score is satisfactory," said Lin Hui, CEO of Zhunxingyunxue Technology of Chengdu, which developed the machine. AI-MATHS is an artificial intelligence program developed in 2014, based on cutting-edge big data technology, artificial intelligence and natural language recognition from Tsinghua University.


Tech's Favorite School Faces Its Biggest Test: the Real World

WIRED

On lengths of yarn stretched between chairs, sixth-grade math students were placing small yellow squares of paper, making number lines--including everything from fractions to negative decimals--in a classroom at Walsh Middle School. Their teacher, Michele O'Connor, had assigned the number lines in previous years, but this year was different. She, personally, hadn't spent much time leading students through practice problems or introducing the basic math concepts they would use in the project. That had largely been relegated to online math lessons, part of separate periods of learning time when students were free to work through computer-based lessons in any subject they chose, at their own pace. The change at Walsh, located in Framingham, Massachusetts, is part of a nationwide pilot program, one that could indicate just how deeply and how quickly the personalized-learning trend will penetrate the average classroom. Indeed, despite the buzz around personalized learning, there's no simple recipe for success, and the common ingredients -- such as adaptive-learning technology and student control over learning -- can backfire if poorly implemented.


7 - 5 - Long-term Short-term-memory

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Why AI Will Be Your Next Go-To Productivity Tool (If It Isn't Already)

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It sounds like something out of a science-fiction movie, but the truth is it's your inevitable reality. The rise of artificial intelligence, or AI, is poised to change the way we think of productivity. That's according to a new report from Accenture, which predicts that AI could boost productivity by up to 40 percent by 2035. Companies are already investing heavily in AI, and not just in the U.S. Put simply, AI is defined as the ability of a machine to mimic intelligent human behavior. It's essentially any sort of technology that is able to make sense of its environment and surroundings, and then act and react accordingly.


Why AI Will Be Your Next Go-To Productivity Tool (If It Isn't Already)

Huffington Post

The education field is also already feeling the impact of AI. According to the Accenture study, math students that used virtual tutors saw pass rates increase by 11 percent. At the same time, dropout rates tumbled by 56 percent. Even further, since these tutors allow students to advance at their own pace, more than half of students completed classes a month earlier than before.


IBM Watson's new job: third grade math teacher advisor • LiketheFuture

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IBM's famous AI system has accomplished many, many things these past years, from making movie trailers to saving a person's life. Now, it's also helping teachers make lesson plans by powering Teacher Advisor, a program IBM developed with the American Federation of Teachers. If you're thinking "How hard could a grade school lesson plan be?" Well, have you seen Common Core mathematics? It's not the same math from back in the day, and teachers who didn't grow up with it might have a tough time conjuring up a way to make it more understandable.


IBM Watson's new job: third grade math teacher

Engadget

IBM's famous supercomputer has accomplished many, many things these past years, from making movie trailers to saving a person's life. Now, it's also helping teachers make lesson plans by powering Teacher Advisor, a program IBM developed with the American Federation of Teachers. If you're thinking "How hard could a grade school lesson plan be?" Well, have you seen Common Core mathematics? It's not the same math from back in the day, and teachers who didn't grow up with it might have a tough time conjuring up a way to make it more understandable.